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Photographer
Red Panda Photography
Posts: 176
Sydney, New South Wales, Australia


Hi,
So i consider myself half decent at retouching (for a photographer) but i did a shoot that was out of my wheel house as far as editing goes.

I'm thinking something fantasy, like sucker punch or dark angel, or even more so, i'm pretty flexible.

here is a sample image, https://fbcdn-sphotos-e-a.akamaihd.net/ … 9832_n.jpg

Would love to hear peoples thoughts and just general talk on this topic. The pic is just a sample to give you an idea of what the shoot was like.

thanks smile
Jan 28 13 12:37 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
pellepiano
Posts: 2,268
Stockholm, Stockholm, Sweden


If you are going to do fantasy images, that generally means you will extract the model from the original image.

For this to be a painless as possible its better to shoot the model against a grey or white background and also use lighting that will fit with the background image.

Planning will get you the most control.
Jan 28 13 01:42 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
ChristopherArter
Posts: 10
Orlando, Florida, US


This will have to be done in something like a composite shoot. It will have to be re-shot in a studio against white or green screen and done that way.

This is an example of something I did that may be somewhat similar http://www.flickr.com/photos/62695832@N03/8425332658

I did that in a home studio, so if you want to do something fantasy inspired, you'll most likely have to do it this way.
Jan 28 13 01:58 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Red Panda Photography
Posts: 176
Sydney, New South Wales, Australia


Hmmmm, i see, thanks guys, i thought (like i said new at this style of shooting a bit) i would be alright shooting in the graveyard and doing the rest in post rather than testing my ability on greenscreen.

Any tips that don't include greenscreen?
Jan 28 13 04:16 pm  Link  Quote 
Retoucher
NotoriousRetouch
Posts: 32
San Antonio, Texas, US


Please don't take my advice offensively. I don't intend to offend you, everything I say is meant to help you.

I do a lot of photomanipulations (my digital artwork is not displayed on this site though, here I do retouch only) and I recommend shooting against a solid plain background that will contrast with the model (especially if you cut the model out using the channels method) This makes for a much easier extraction from the original file's background.

Also make sure there is not a whole lot of distractions in the image, because again you need to remove the model from the background, and too many elements will cause more time consuming and frustrating work. You will need to edit around different 'tones' and 'values' instead of one solid background color.

Although the pic you provided is a sample,your picture its self needs to have better quality if you want to achieve a good manipulation using the model (not just using her as a reference). The flash here is harsh creating strong shadows behind her legs and the lighting falling on her is flat. This could still be fixed in post, but it will be more time consuming and the final result will not be as high quality. A really well executed photo to start with will yield the best results in the end.

Try to make the model the main focus, instead of loosing her in a sea of background. You want her to take up as much as the frame as possible so you have more detail to work with. Its a whole lot easier to edit a larger version of the model then a tiny one. If there is a particular background you really want to use, shoot it separately. But keep in mind angles and perspective, and also that the lighting will match.

It is possible to shoot the model on location and edit that one image, but I personally feel you have more control when the background and model are separate.

anyway, I am sorry if this confuses or upsets you. I hope I was of some help. smile
Jan 28 13 06:26 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
pellepiano
Posts: 2,268
Stockholm, Stockholm, Sweden


Red Panda Photography wrote:
Any tips that don't include greenscreen?

Yes, Refine Edge in Photoshop is a good tool to extract models .
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jI-9Mr7cLBY

Jan 29 13 12:30 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
richy01
Posts: 153
Amsterdam, Noord-Holland, Netherlands


Best is to shoot against an uniform background, I prefer to use medium or dark grey.
Topaz remask or PS selectiontools and refine edge will do the trick.
Here's an expamle I did the other day( I am not a great PSwizard)

http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c43/rich1910/AAMODELS/avatarH_zpsfdba71fa.jpg

http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c43/rich1910/IMG_3662web_zps4ffb587f.jpg

Check out Calvin Hollywood or Glynn Dewis for some composite tuts.
Jan 29 13 06:39 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Red Panda Photography
Posts: 176
Sydney, New South Wales, Australia


So tried a test run, and i only did it quickly so some of the edges aren't the best but would love to hear any feedback, or if i'm posting this in the wrong section, i just thought it would fit on this thread rather than making a new one.
https://fbcdn-sphotos-a-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-snc6/269275_10151372457653514_1703763889_n.jpg
Jan 29 13 09:13 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Downtown Pro Photo
Posts: 1,547
Crystal Lake, Illinois, US


When doing composite fantasy work the key is planning everything ahead of time.  You need to make sure the lighting on all your elements match up, and if they don't you'll need to be able to change them in post.
Also scale and perspective is something to pay great attention to.  You don't want part of the image not matching another one in direction.  Focus planes are another concern, don't have sharp-fuzzy-sharp in terms of the depth of the image, everything has to follow the rules as if it was shot in camera as a single frame.
Throw in interacting shadows from the subject to objects around it being sure to have the proper umbra and penumbra for the shadows.
If there's any mixing of light sources, make sure to use the appropriate color temps for where they show.
There's a lot of preplanning that goes into a successful composite.
Jan 29 13 10:32 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Red Panda Photography
Posts: 176
Sydney, New South Wales, Australia


Downtown Pro Photo wrote:
When doing composite fantasy work the key is planning everything ahead of time.  You need to make sure the lighting on all your elements match up, and if they don't you'll need to be able to change them in post.
Also scale and perspective is something to pay great attention to.  You don't want part of the image not matching another one in direction.  Focus planes are another concern, don't have sharp-fuzzy-sharp in terms of the depth of the image, everything has to follow the rules as if it was shot in camera as a single frame.
Throw in interacting shadows from the subject to objects around it being sure to have the proper umbra and penumbra for the shadows.
If there's any mixing of light sources, make sure to use the appropriate color temps for where they show.
There's a lot of preplanning that goes into a successful composite.

Cheers thanks for those tips

Jan 29 13 09:23 pm  Link  Quote 
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