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first1234
Photographer
MKPhoto
Posts: 5,665
Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada


RKD Photographic wrote:

Last year in eastern Germany it got down to -27C, the year before that it was -28C in Dresden.
In the winter of 2006-2007 it was -32C at Bergen-Hohne (Belsen), Niedersachsen, where I was based and -34C at Drawsko Pomoskiye Training Area in western Poland

I live here, remember.

Yes, it does happen occasionally. I used to live there, I remember wink

But in the SI shoot context, it is another 10-15 degrees C (25F)  to go to down to get these -45.  I think we've "established" that one can strip on a lark to a bikini at -45, one can take pictures when it is really cold, and also that SI shoot was not shot at -45 degrees.

Mar 04 13 04:50 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
RKD Photographic
Posts: 3,265
Iserlohn, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany


MKPhoto wrote:
Yes, it does happen occasionally. I used to live there, I remember wink

But in the SI shoot context, it is another 10-15 degrees C (25F)  to go to down to get these -45.  I think we've "established" that one can strip on a lark to a bikini at -45, one can take pictures when it is really cold, and also that SI shoot was not shot at -45 degrees.

I've no idea where you used to live. Did you tell me this previously?
My post was in response to someone saying his cameras only worked at 'room temperature' (he was exaggerating, I have no doubt): cameras work fine in extreme cold and I've personal experience of that... I gave examples - you appeared to contest my assertion that those temperatures occurred.

So...your point please, caller?

Mar 04 13 04:56 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
MKPhoto
Posts: 5,665
Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada


RKD Photographic wrote:
I've no idea where you used to live. Did you tell me this previously?
My post was in response to someone saying his cameras only worked at 'room temperature' (he was exaggerating, I have no doubt): cameras work fine in extreme cold and I've personal experience of that... I gave examples - you appeared to contest my assertion that those temperatures occurred.

So...your point please, caller?

I did not say the low temperature don't happen, I said they happen only occasionally.

The point is that we can shoot at -30, we can strip for a moment at -45, but this is not what happened on the SI shoot.

And the "wink" at shooting in Norway and Poland is a "wink"

Mar 04 13 05:28 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
RKD Photographic
Posts: 3,265
Iserlohn, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany


MKPhoto wrote:
And the "wink" at shooting in Norway and Poland is a "wink"

nahhh... it was bloody sad sad sad sad

I hate the cold... hmm

big_smile

Mar 04 13 05:30 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
A-M-P
Posts: 18,211
Orlando, Florida, US


all of that for photos that ended up looking like shit
Mar 04 13 05:34 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
MKPhoto
Posts: 5,665
Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada


RKD Photographic wrote:
nahhh... it was bloody sad sad sad sad

I hate the cold... hmm

big_smile

I like cold, but I don't like COLD. -25 is fine, just remember about  hat, gloves, and scarf and keep the battery warm. -40 and lower is COLD.

Mar 04 13 05:36 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
RKD Photographic
Posts: 3,265
Iserlohn, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany


MKPhoto wrote:

I like cold, but I don't like COLD. -25 is fine, just remember about  hat and  gloves. -40 is COLD.

Yeah - nowhere gets cold like Canada - I have horrible memories of Medicine Hat (actually Suffield Training Area, just NW of Med. Hat)...

Too hot in the summer, too cold in the winter... and the transition from one to the other seemed to only take three days... sad

Mar 04 13 05:40 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
MKPhoto
Posts: 5,665
Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada


RKD Photographic wrote:
Yeah - nowhere gets cold like Canada - I have horrible memories of Medicine Hat (actually Suffield Training Area, just NW of Med. Hat)...

Too hot in the summer, too cold in the winter... and the transition from one to the other seemed to only take three days... sad

Alaska is colder. Winnipeg is OK, but Fairbanks not for me.

The coldest a model braved elements with me here was around -10, -12, for a quick, quick, quick snap. But I cancelled dance shoots at -15 (edit: -12C = 10F)

Mar 04 13 05:52 am  Link  Quote 
Model
Retiredmodel
Posts: 7,884
Monmouth, Wales, United Kingdom


RKD Photographic wrote:
There should be no problems with shooting Nikons at -45C.
I was in the Army and I've shot in Norway and Poland where the daytime temperatures were as low as -30C.
My Royal Navy colleagues have worked in the Antarctic with temperatures even lower than that. Wearing gloves is essential - skin sticks to cold metal at very low temperatures and I used pigskin pilot's gloves worn inside fleece outer mittens with removable finger-sections to keep the hands warm.

As long at the batteries are kept warm and the cameras aren't subjected to sudden temperature/humidity changes which would result in condensation forming inside, you'll be fine.

Extreme cold isn't that bad - wind and moisture are the real killers - if you can keep dry and the wind off it's fine even down at -30C...
I found that lower than -10C it just feels 'cold'. I've been colder and more uncomfortable in +1-3C and damp/rainy conditions than ultra-low freezing conditions...

Yes you are correct. My camera seemed ok in minus 35.
Certainly it is often very dry in such places especially when very cold. You cannot see your breath for example because there is so little moisture. But my batteries in my cheapy camera didn't last long. OK in my canon.

Be interesting to get Ira Meyer's input here because he shoots often in the arctic and antarctic. Wonderful images he creates. I had the pleasure of meeting him in London at the RGS.
It is cool he is a MM member:
https://www.irameyer.com/galleries/anta … tica1.html
http://irameyer.com/galleries/antarctica/full_size_photos/1.jpg

In the arctic summer can get quite warm. Kangerlussuaq was plus 25 and the air was thick with mosquitoes. So you couldn't shoot swimwear there but just a few miles away up on the glaciers there were no mossies and there are amazing backdrops you could shoot. Here ya go. But keep your model covered up despite the heat until you get there! I had 400 bites because I thought it too hot for two layers but you need them to stop the bites.
http://sphotos-f.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/403847_10151886545365637_746637861_n.jpg




Here it is about minus 25 however and significantly - windy so the chill factor was real bad - and is taken at a remote scientific camp on the North Geenland ice sheet. I had only just finished work at this point but many people dress up for dinner on saturday night at this and other scientific camps in the arctic and antarctic it's a bit of a tradition. A fellow scientist wanted a pic outside in her dress but it was unbearable! More than a minute or two and you'd have trouble. It is about 11pm here - and the daylight is 24 hour.

http://sphotos-h.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash3/535004_10150961125907054_1283391741_n.jpg

I work with ice cores in cold rooms that are almost minus 30 regularly at the Niels Bohr institute etc. Most people can only stand it for about half an hour. I work through for hours because I always wear fur - as do many of the Danish scientists - as well as merino wool thermals and goose down suit. And yes you don't take your gloves off for long!

Sir Ranulph Fiennes incidentally had to call off his recent antarctic crossing because of frostbite in training; though the rest of the team are continuing which will help raise a lot of money for charity:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-21604597

Mar 04 13 06:41 am  Link  Quote 
guide forum
Model
Anna Adrielle
Posts: 18,763
Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium


It's not like she would have been standing there for hours in nothing but a bikini. It's perfectly possible that they tested eveything and set everything in place, then she quickly undressed, they shot for 2 minutes and she got dressed again, and the whole process would be repeated.

Plus she's wearing warm shoes in all the outside shots, and pants in some of them.

Other than the awful quality of the entire spread, and personal opinion's on kate, she's a pretty girl. it's hard to take a picture of her where she looks "ugly", and she does have experience so she can easily get into a couple of working poses in 1-2 minutes and come up with decent results.
Mar 04 13 08:06 am  Link  Quote 
Model
MB JenB
Posts: 3,036
Clarksville, Tennessee, US


MKPhoto wrote:
Let me assure you. It was not a -45 degree day. On a -45 degree day every breath looks like a cloud and ice builds up on the eyelashes. Exposed skin turns white and blueish in a minute, starting from your hands. Your nose starts running very quickly.  You start shivering in 30 seconds if you don't wear stuff. At -45 degree mechanical stuff start breaking up.  At -45 degrees life slows down, even in the North.

....

Hi,
At -45 degrees in Fairbanks there is no moisture in the air to leave breath clouds, it has to be warmer than that. smile

However, eyelashes and scarves will build up frost though, its generally not noticed with each breath. Also, its so cold that your nasal hair falls out. True! smile

Jen

Mar 04 13 03:14 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
MB JenB
Posts: 3,036
Clarksville, Tennessee, US


Christopher Hartman wrote:
They have a hot tub (assuming it's hot) on the boat and some photos are with her completely soaked.  Soaking wet at -45 degrees...how long would it take for the water in her hair freeze over...even under direct sunlight.  Does the Antarctic even get that cold when the sun is unfiltered and no storms?

Hi,

Over here I absolutely love to go to the Chena Hot Springs, in a bikini and have to walk about 20 + feet into and out of the water outdoors, it is best when it is -30 or more. Yes though your hair will freeze from the moisture yet, you are "hot" when you exit. It would have to have been warm water though because if not, then it would be ice. ;P!

As long as we aren't out there exposed for many minutes, (I'm sure she had a dry warm towel waiting for her,) its okay.

Gosh, however, it isn't the Antarctic.

Its kinda funny to read these replies. However I only saw one picture and agreed that it looks like the challenge of the cold was a bit much for her, and likely the photographers too!! The ones here are used to shooting out in it and understand that a warm car running with blankets are helpful for all. Usually when the photographers are complaining its too cold then its okay for the model to say so too!! wink
Jen

Mar 04 13 03:21 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
MB JenB
Posts: 3,036
Clarksville, Tennessee, US


BTHPhoto wrote:
Those must have been the warmest four years on record, and if you really had water poured on your face to release a frozen scarf, it was from panic, not necessity.

Thank you BTH Photo, I was thinking the same thing. I've only been here two winters, (1 year) and its reached colder than minus 45 several times each winter.

Mar 04 13 03:27 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Retiredmodel
Posts: 7,884
Monmouth, Wales, United Kingdom


BTW the temperature at Captian Arturo Prat Chilean Antarctic base today was plus 3 - a full two degrees warmer than the UK.

http://www.wunderground.com/global/stations/89057.html
Mar 04 13 03:44 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
NYMPH
Posts: 623
Oakland, California, US


EMILY  C wrote:
As I stated before in one of these threads re: shooting in freezing temperatures - it's shock value and very dangerous even to be out in sub-30 degree weather like this, never mind sub-zero.  If they wanted a shot of a model in a bikini in the snow, the shoot could have been done anywhere there is snow, they chose this particular place purely for shock value.

For many, the natural tendency when we feel uncomfortable is to get quiet and shut down, only making things worse.  For anyone who is thinking about shooting outside in freezing temperatures (nevermind Antarctica) they need to make sure they're communicating openly and loudly about how they're feeling and if/when they need breaks.

I completely agree! I posted a while ago regarding Praising Risky Behaviour. We tend to applaud people who go the extra mile for the shot. But then, what are the consequences? Where do you draw the line? And at what point does the risk exceed the picture quality?

Models do push themselves, all the time, but audiences like to see how far they will go for 'the shot'. It turns into a weird race to push the model's limits. Kind of like ballet dancers quasi bragging about how badly their toes are injured. I'm entirely against this mindset. And while there have been so much talk about how brave and fierce Upton is, there's very little discussion about these troubles after the fact.

Mar 24 13 11:07 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
NYMPH
Posts: 623
Oakland, California, US


Oh, and I have to completely agree about the quality of the pictures. Ugh. I think they're using the publicity to cover up the bad job. Kind of like how the worst summer blockbusters sometimes get so much press.
Mar 24 13 11:12 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
I M N Photography
Posts: 2,330
New York, New York, US


Raven Photography wrote:
Kate Upton was sent to Antarctica for a bikini shoot for Sports Illustrated and on coming home her body started shutting down due to reportedly -45 degree's temperature. She started losing her eyesight and her hearing.

http://grazia.ninemsn.com.au/blog.aspx? … ments=true

Can you imagine the cost taking a model to Antarctica plus the scare of this happening to her ?

They had to have photo shopped her goose bumps out surely.

Is it even medically possible for something like that to happen, prior to frostbite or any other signs of physical damage? A smile like that in those weather conditions can only mean one of two things:
1. Lots of mullah in the bank after the shoot is done.
2. Navy Seal training.

(I go with number 1)

Photographers in this city shoot bikini-clad models out in public during the dead of Winter all the time! The clients love the contrast in attire and weather partly because of shock value, but also because it is a very unusual setting.

The dramatics of this story are likely meant to rouse the sleeping audience, but regardless of whether she got really sick or not, I am sure a lot of people "bought" the story.

Mar 26 13 01:01 pm  Link  Quote 
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