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Forums > Photography Talk > Gray background for fashion -- which 'gray' ? Search   Reply
Photographer
Boreal Photography
Posts: 292
Duluth, Minnesota, US


EDIT: Did a google search, found a thread already done on this here on MM! So ignore this thread, or the moderator can delete it if desired.
http://www.modelmayhem.com/po.php?thread_id=795549
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I need to order a gray paper background for indoor studio fashion photography. Found quite a few varieties of 'gray' on BH....
Feb 13 13 06:54 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
The Effective Image
Posts: 3,908
Lansing, Michigan, US


I'd go for a darker shade of gray. You'll get lighter grays just by shooting on white and not separately lighting the background. The range of 'light' grays you'll get depends on how you light the model, and how much spill onto the background there is.

Just my opinion.
Feb 13 13 04:17 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
B R U N E S C I
Posts: 25,319
Bath, England, United Kingdom


"Fashion grey", obviously wink






Just my $0.02

Ciao
Stefano

www.stefanobrunesci.com
Feb 13 13 04:21 pm  Link  Quote 
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Photographer
Giacomo Cirrincioni
Posts: 20,613
New York, New York, US


I use both 'Fashion' and 'Thunder' Grey.  Thunder being my personal favorite.
Feb 13 13 04:26 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Vector One Photography
Posts: 2,480
Fort Lauderdale, Florida, US


Doesn't matter which shade of grey you purchase. It all changes depending on how much light you put on it.
Feb 13 13 04:34 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
J O H N A L L A N
Posts: 9,483
Santa Ana, California, US


You can get virtually any shade of grey from a white background.
My studio has a permanent sweep painted white. It can be any shade of grey based on how far the model is from it and how I light it independently.
Feb 13 13 04:48 pm  Link  Quote 
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Photographer
Giacomo Cirrincioni
Posts: 20,613
New York, New York, US


John Allan wrote:
You can get virtually any shade of grey from a white background.
My studio has a permanent sweep painted white. It can be any shade of grey based on how far the model is from it and how I light it independently.

This is true, however, I find when doing full length shots, if I want the floor grey close to the background grey it's easier with seamless (for how I light, at least).  How do you deal with that?

Feb 13 13 04:52 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Ken Marcus Studios
Posts: 8,349
Los Angeles, California, US


Thunder Grey . . !
Feb 13 13 04:56 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
UnikImagez
Posts: 96
Dallas, Texas, US


John Allan wrote:
You can get virtually any shade of grey from a white background.
My studio has a permanent sweep painted white. It can be any shade of grey based on how far the model is from it and how I light it independently.

This

Vector One Photography wrote:
Doesn't matter which shade of grey you purchase. It all changes depending on how much light you put on it.

And this

Feb 13 13 04:56 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
MMR Digital
Posts: 1,591
Doylestown, Pennsylvania, US


A roll of Thunder Grey just showed up at my door this evening. I was hoping it would get here before the rain/snow started so I didn't come home to a soupy cardboard box and it did. I also just got off the phone confirming an MM model shoot for Sunday. We'll see how I make out with it.
Feb 13 13 05:02 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
J O H N A L L A N
Posts: 9,483
Santa Ana, California, US


Paramour Productions wrote:

This is true, however, I find when doing full length shots, if I want the floor grey close to the background grey it's easier with seamless (for how I light, at least).  How do you deal with that?

The sweep is no different than seamless in that respect. It's got basically the same 'sweep' between wall and floor you'd typically do with seamless.
Although the floor has a tendency to get a bit dirtier (can't just pull down new clean sheet).

Feb 13 13 05:02 pm  Link  Quote 
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Photographer
Giacomo Cirrincioni
Posts: 20,613
New York, New York, US


Paramour Productions wrote:
This is true, however, I find when doing full length shots, if I want the floor grey close to the background grey it's easier with seamless (for how I light, at least).  How do you deal with that?
John Allan wrote:
The sweep is no different than seamless in that respect. It's got basically the same 'sweep' between wall and floor you'd typically do with seamless.
Although the floor has a tendency to get a bit dirtier (can't just pull down new clean sheet).

I'm not making myself clear.  I'm sorry.

Think of a full length catalog shot and you need to light the whole model evenly (no fall off toward the legs/feet).  If you position her away from the back of the cyc you can make it go darker (inverse square law).  However, the light on her, will also light the part of the cyc she is standing on resulting in a brighter shade of grey, if not white.  That's what I'm talking about.  By using grey seamless, with independent lighting for subject and background, you can get them to match.  Not sure how I would do that with just the cyc.  That's what I'm asking - how do you do that?

Feb 13 13 05:21 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
MC Photo
Posts: 4,142
New York, New York, US


Paramour Productions wrote:

I'm not making myself clear.  I'm sorry.

Think of a full length catalog shot and you need to light the whole llama evenly (no fall off toward the legs/feet).  If you position her away from the back of the cyc you can make it go darker (inverse square law).  However, the light on her, will also light the part of the cyc she is standing on resulting in a brighter shade of grey, if not white.  That's what I'm talking about.  By using grey seamless, with independent lighting for subject and background, you can get them to match.  Not sure how I would do that with just the cyc.  That's what I'm asking - how do you do that?

That's a good question. I'm curious to hear how people answer it.

If I were to try, I'd start out lighting from the top and control the upper body lighting and background with that.

Then for the lower body, I'd try lighting from as low as possible, flag to protect the floor and the light as close as the framing will allow.

Feb 13 13 05:52 pm  Link  Quote 
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Photographer
Giacomo Cirrincioni
Posts: 20,613
New York, New York, US


MC Photo wrote:

That's a good question. I'm curious to hear how people answer it.

If I were to try, I'd start out lighting from the top and control the upper body lighting and background with that.

Then for the lower body, I'd try lighting from as low as possible, flag to protect the floor and the light as close as the framing will allow.

I've done that.  Major pain in the ass, and it severely limits the model's ability to move.  Far simpler to shoot on seamless.  I know of no other way to get that catalog look.  I could certainly control the color/shade of the entire cyc, if even bright lighting isn't needed over the full range of the model, but not if it is.

Or even if you're just shooting the shoes.  I'm shooting an editorial coming up with Battalion boots.  I need to show the floor.

Feb 13 13 06:07 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Aaron Lewis Photography
Posts: 5,076
Catskill, New York, US


From Setshop I use the new DigiGrey for a lot of my catalog work and I use Dove grey for modeling when I can.
Feb 13 13 06:13 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Jay Strange
Posts: 127
Tampa, Florida, US


Thunder Grey from the Savage Co. was always in my studio when I
had one...
Elegant,versatile,doesn't show dirty footprints as much as some of the lighter shades...tough to beat IMO
Feb 14 13 05:36 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
AVD AlphaDuctions
Posts: 10,478
Gatineau, Quebec, Canada


paper is a relatively inexpensive resource and can be recycled.  get all 50 shades
Feb 14 13 06:46 pm  Link  Quote 
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