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Retoucher
pixel dimension ilusion
Posts: 1,226
Brussels, Brussels, Belgium


hi there im having trouble on the final step that i do when i retouch
removing hair strays from the background, well when is one colour not ,but when is is an gradient yes , the color will not match when i clone or use the healing brush , i try sometimes to copy and past but because most images are crop by the photographer there is no great space between hairs and border , so any sugetion will be apriaciated thks
Mar 18 13 03:37 pm  Link  Quote 
Retoucher
Rob Mac Studio
Posts: 1,105
London, England, United Kingdom


How can anyone help, if we can't see what you are seeing,post it up.
Mar 18 13 03:39 pm  Link  Quote 
Retoucher
Avilio
Posts: 56
Tegucigalpa, Distrito Central, Honduras


Rob Mac Studio wrote:
How can anyone help, if we can't see what you are seeing,post it up.

+1

Mar 18 13 04:15 pm  Link  Quote 
Retoucher
pixel dimension ilusion
Posts: 1,226
Brussels, Brussels, Belgium


http://i47.tinypic.com/33vgtc4.jpg
see at the left the hair strays there is an gradient if i paint whit gray the gradient
will loose the quality an it will be an light gray and dark grake it will not match
in other words the gradient desapear and i dont want that cause thats the beauty of the background
Mar 18 13 08:21 pm  Link  Quote 
Retoucher
Mike Needham Retouching
Posts: 369
Cheltenham, England, United Kingdom


A combination of cloning with darken and lighten blend modes and judicious use of the heal tool will get you there. Add a solar curve adjustment layer to see your progress and if you have done a decent job.
Mar 19 13 12:55 am  Link  Quote 
Retoucher
AKMac
Posts: 306
London, England, United Kingdom


Removing stray hairs and tidying edges against a smoothly graduated background is one if those frustrating scenarios that you feel should be easy, but can seem to take for ever. One of the quickest ways I've found of dealing with it is to duplicate the layer and use Liquify to gently pull the backdrop area towards the centre with a very big brush. This preserves the smoothness of the gradient without significantly compromising the noise structure. Then all you need to do is apply a layer mask and paint in more backdrop where you need it. I agree with Mike that it's a good idea to use a solar curve to check this sort of work, where noise and smooth gradations are involved.
I'm not sure how useful the above technique might be in some of the tighter areas of the image you've posted, but it can be a real time saver where there is enough backdrop to "get hold of".
Mar 19 13 01:41 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
PhotoHive
Posts: 61
Constanța, Constanța, Romania


Or if you are very lazy, remove the background completely, and generate a digital gradient...
Mar 19 13 02:30 am  Link  Quote 
Retoucher
Ornaments
Posts: 12
Brighton, England, United Kingdom


AKMac wrote:
Removing stray hairs and tidying edges against a smoothly graduated background is one if those frustrating scenarios that you feel should be easy, but can seem to take for ever. One of the quickest ways I've found of dealing with it is to duplicate the layer and use Liquify to gently pull the backdrop area towards the centre with a very big brush. This preserves the smoothness of the gradient without significantly compromising the noise structure. Then all you need to do is apply a layer mask and paint in more backdrop where you need it. I agree with Mike that it's a good idea to use a solar curve to check this sort of work, where noise and smooth gradations are involved.
I'm not sure how useful the above technique might be in some of the tighter areas of the image you've posted, but it can be a real time saver where there is enough backdrop to "get hold of".

Nice tip, thanks

Mar 19 13 03:11 am  Link  Quote 
Retoucher
pixel dimension ilusion
Posts: 1,226
Brussels, Brussels, Belgium


Edd Kaspar wrote:

Nice tip, thanks

thks a lot verry help full

Mar 19 13 07:41 am  Link  Quote 
Retoucher
pixel dimension ilusion
Posts: 1,226
Brussels, Brussels, Belgium


AKMac wrote:
Removing stray hairs and tidying edges against a smoothly graduated background is one if those frustrating scenarios that you feel should be easy, but can seem to take for ever. One of the quickest ways I've found of dealing with it is to duplicate the layer and use Liquify to gently pull the backdrop area towards the centre with a very big brush. This preserves the smoothness of the gradient without significantly compromising the noise structure. Then all you need to do is apply a layer mask and paint in more backdrop where you need it. I agree with Mike that it's a good idea to use a solar curve to check this sort of work, where noise and smooth gradations are involved.
I'm not sure how useful the above technique might be in some of the tighter areas of the image you've posted, but it can be a real time saver where there is enough backdrop to "get hold of".

thks a lot i will give it a try

Mar 19 13 07:42 am  Link  Quote 
Retoucher
pixel dimension ilusion
Posts: 1,226
Brussels, Brussels, Belgium


Mike Needham Retouching wrote:
A combination of cloning with darken and lighten blend modes and judicious use of the heal tool will get you there. Add a solar curve adjustment layer to see your progress and if you have done a decent job.

thks for tthe advice but i dont like solor curve layer is anoying for my eyes

Mar 19 13 07:43 am  Link  Quote 
Retoucher
Avilio
Posts: 56
Tegucigalpa, Distrito Central, Honduras


AKMac wrote:
Removing stray hairs and tidying edges against a smoothly graduated background is one if those frustrating scenarios that you feel should be easy, but can seem to take for ever. One of the quickest ways I've found of dealing with it is to duplicate the layer and use Liquify to gently pull the backdrop area towards the centre with a very big brush. This preserves the smoothness of the gradient without significantly compromising the noise structure. Then all you need to do is apply a layer mask and paint in more backdrop where you need it. I agree with Mike that it's a good idea to use a solar curve to check this sort of work, where noise and smooth gradations are involved.

Thanks, it seems a good tip.

I would like to see this on a video tutorial, is there any maybe?

Mar 19 13 08:22 am  Link  Quote 
Retoucher
Greg Curran
Posts: 204
Toronto, Ontario, Canada


Mike Needham Retouching wrote:
Add a solar curve adjustment layer to see your progress and if you have done a decent job.

Finally someone else who uses a soar curve, I catch so many mistakes by other retouchers who don't use it.  Especially with blowing out backgrounds, always some scum dot in there.

Mar 19 13 09:03 am  Link  Quote 
Retoucher
Ken Fournelle
Posts: 99
Saint Paul, Minnesota, US


Greg,

I use the solar curve all the time.  I even use it in conjunction with a C&W contrast layer in dodging and burning.  In that combination you can see some very subtle
tone variations.  It helps.  I use the Supporting Layers action from Jonas Wendorf.

k
Mar 19 13 09:30 am  Link  Quote 
Retoucher
Ken Fournelle
Posts: 99
Saint Paul, Minnesota, US


Not to confuse, I meant a B&W contrast layer.

sheeesh.
k
Mar 19 13 09:31 am  Link  Quote 
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