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Forums > Digital Art and Retouching > The "Golden Rule" for Not Retouching Search   Reply
first12
Photographer
Dean Johnson Photo
Posts: 56,482
Minneapolis, Minnesota, US


JoshuaBerardi wrote:

"touch everything a little bit, but nothing too much."

Perfect rule for first dates too!
smile

Mar 21 13 03:17 pm  Link  Quote 
Retoucher
alberta86
Posts: 64
Orlando, Florida, US


Mark Laubenheimer wrote:
Oblique Strategies....

http://www.rtqe.net/ObliqueStrategies/Ed1.html

Awesome list!  My favorite was "Take a Break"

Mar 21 13 03:45 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Danella Lucioni
Posts: 535
Florence, Toscana, Italy


A photographer once gave me a nose job and an eye lift. Doesn't really help build my portfolio at all, and not like a need that type of surgery anyway.

Please don't do that to your models!
Mar 21 13 03:46 pm  Link  Quote 
Retoucher
alberta86
Posts: 64
Orlando, Florida, US


Danella Lucioni wrote:
A photographer once gave me a nose job and an eye lift. Doesn't really help build my portfolio at all, and not like a need that type of surgery anyway.

Please don't do that to your models!

This is eye opening for me to get the model's perspective.  Wish I could see an example as I have "fixed" many noses, eyes and lips.

Mar 21 13 03:53 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
WIP
Posts: 15,367
Cheltenham, England, United Kingdom


Make it believable.

http://erikjohanssonphoto.com/

Erik Johansson.
Mar 21 13 04:56 pm  Link  Quote 
Artist/Painter
sdgillis
Posts: 2,424
Portland, Oregon, US


If you hate it, don't show it to the client. They will pick it.
Mar 21 13 05:42 pm  Link  Quote 
Retoucher
Natalia_Taffarel
Posts: 7,665
Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina


sdgillis wrote:
If you hate it, don't show it to the client. They will pick it.

+1

Mar 21 13 06:08 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
WCR3
Posts: 1,016
Houston, Texas, US


Danella Lucioni wrote:
A photographer once gave me a nose job and an eye lift. Doesn't really help build my portfolio at all, and not like a need that type of surgery anyway.

Please don't do that to your models!

I'd say that depends on who ultimately is using the photo. If it is the model, then don't do something s/he would find disturbingly unlike her/himself. But if it's for the photographer or a third-party client, then the model really doesn't have much say in the matter.

Mar 27 13 02:52 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
KMP
Posts: 4,708
Houston, Texas, US


If  I may add one:

Some photos are just not worth the effort..and are better left to die in dignity. smile


sdgillis wrote:
If you hate it, don't show it to the client. They will pick it.

So sad but so true..  sad

Mar 27 13 03:08 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Perry Finch Media
Posts: 149
Chicago, Illinois, US


Like the natural look !!
Mar 27 13 03:19 pm  Link  Quote 
Retoucher
Retouch007
Posts: 403
East Newark, New Jersey, US


Two

1. make it look real.

2. take it to the finish.
Mar 27 13 03:31 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
WIP
Posts: 15,367
Cheltenham, England, United Kingdom


Is it printable ? and what will it look like in print ?

Blown high lights, over saturated colours, skin that looks like mega high pass, air brush looking like an illustration, over/under sharpened.
Mar 28 13 06:55 am  Link  Quote 
Model
Eveski
Posts: 2
Worcester, Massachusetts, US


i'm just starting out as a photographer and i'm also learning about retouching and whatnot, i found this thread to be really helpful but would also like to add something in.
being a model as well i really dislike it when i get photos back that have been edited so much that i don't even look like myself anymore. when i do retouching i think of what my mom used to tell me about make up, "you want to look good without it looking obvious that you have any on". so i try to improve the overall appearance without it being obvious that it was edited. you want to capture what the person looks like, not what you want them to look like. the only things i remove are blemishes, those are temporary and no one wants to remember they had that zit on their chin anyway. but things like scars, birth marks, other permanent marks, i think it's ok to reduce their appearance (i.e. lightening a dark birthmark, reducing the redness of a scar) if they are really distracting but i don't remove them completely.
Apr 12 13 11:07 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Stan Schurman
Posts: 2
Barrie, Ontario, Canada


I shoot raw, so retouching is almost always essential. There is no hard and fast rule and each image gets whatever attention it needs. Maybe "don't go overboard" is a good general rule.

I'm always amused by those who say 'I never retouch' as though it was some indication of superior technique. The camera is a tool and doesn't always capture the image you have in mind or the scene that you originally observed, especially as different cameras render the same scene differently. Even the best equipment has its limitations and using an editing program to fill in what the camera didn't capture or for which it couldn't compensate is not an indication of poor techniques.
Apr 12 13 12:37 pm  Link  Quote 
Retoucher
Rafael_Alexander
Posts: 82
Atlanta, Georgia, US


Peano wrote:
Mine is: "There are no rules."

+1

Apr 12 13 08:25 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
WIP
Posts: 15,367
Cheltenham, England, United Kingdom


The "Golden Rule" for Not Retouching, not possible as retouching's gone mad with need for more than perfection.
Apr 22 13 02:49 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Don Garrett
Posts: 4,304
Escondido, California, US


People who know what they are doing should retouch, those who don't shouldn't. It is simple. Any image can be improved with skillful retouching, and any image can be destroyed with bad retouching. I guess it also matters what one means when they say "retouching", but that's another can of worms that doesn't need opening at this time.
-Don
Apr 22 13 03:44 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Venus Light Magic
Posts: 83
Stockton, California, US


To me photography is about catching nature and light. How much you can do to control the composition of a shot varies widely from studio shooting to open air event shooting. Having said that you would like to control as much of the environment as you can from lighting, model appearance, pose, ambiance, on and on. The more of this you can do up front the better the chances that you will come away with a shot that will stand on its own right out of the camera. Sometimes when things don't go as planned, camera settings, lights, model position, the dreaded lingerie label or stray hairs, on and on, then you can augment or "fix' the picture in post-processing. In other words, I use it to enhance or bring the picture to what I had in mind but was not able to capture.

And then there are the instances when post-production becomes an intentional part of the shot. In other words, you compose the shot knowing that you are going to use a certain effect in your favorite software to enhance the picture to your vision. Such is the case with Infrared photography. Or sometimes I will underexpose the subject against a bright backdrop so I can create a high key effect with the subject in post-production. The great film photogs such as Ansel Adams always composed their picture based on the chemicals and paper they planned to use in the lab. So even the greats relied on post-processing. Digital photogs simply exchanged the lab for photoshop.

Hope that makes sense. I was just trying to kill time while I finished this large upload to my website...

Cheers,
-Aaron
Apr 22 13 04:01 pm  Link  Quote 
Retoucher
alberta86
Posts: 64
Orlando, Florida, US


c_h_r_i_s wrote:
The "Golden Rule" for Not Retouching, not possible as retouching's gone mad with need for more than perfection.

Do you think it's photographers, retouchers or the public seeking this perfection?

Apr 22 13 07:02 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
WIP
Posts: 15,367
Cheltenham, England, United Kingdom


Not sure who but some media reports about magazine images being over retouched this was probably complaints by the public reported to the 'Advertising Standards Authority', the one that comes to mind being the 'Dove' campaign or M&S TV advert in the UK with model Twiggy.

But I've still life images where a friend who works in cgi was convinced the the image was cgi !
Also recently a head shot/beauty, the make up artist did an incredible job and the retouch in minimal. The model stated her agency may be reluctant to use the shot as they may think it's an over retouched image.

And that could be the dilemma carefully crafted images be it lighting or MUA people may well think the image has been heavily manipulated.
Apr 23 13 02:38 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Expression Unlimited
Posts: 1,125
San Diego, California, US


Danella Lucioni wrote:
A photographer once gave me a nose job and an eye lift. Doesn't really help build my portfolio at all, and not like a need that type of surgery anyway.

Please don't do that to your models!

good point,  if he wants it that way in his Portfolio that's one thing ... but you should receive images that look like you that you can use (and don't make you feel you weren't good enough)

Apr 23 13 03:07 am  Link  Quote 
Retoucher
Rafael_Alexander
Posts: 82
Atlanta, Georgia, US


remain invisible!
Apr 28 13 10:48 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Andrea Acailawen
Posts: 948
Tampa, Florida, US


sdgillis wrote:
If you hate it, don't show it to the client. They will pick it.

lol!

Apr 29 13 09:02 am  Link  Quote 
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