login info join!
Forums > General Industry > "Shots I want to recreate" lists Search   Reply
12last
Photographer
I Ference Photography
Posts: 1,152
Rochester, New York, US


I've noticed, both on my own photos and on those of other MM members, that one common list theme generally goes along the lines of "Shots I want to recreate", or some variation on this concept.

I understand how this might appeal to a model to an extent.  Although it would be derivative, it might still add some value to their portfolio in terms of marketing, or perhaps the model just wants to see herself in a particularly cool scene.

But as a photographer, I must admit I'm stymied.  When I see another photographer's work and am blown away, I might find inspiration in it, but I'd hardly want to replicate it.  Where's the creative energy in imitation?  If I see a gorgeous location in somebody else's photo, I'll appreciate the hell out of it, but I'm not going to seek it out and shoot there - because it's been done.  And even if I walked away with something that the average observer would term "better" than the shot I copied - it's still a shot I copied.  So what's the point?

I'm curious how others feel on this - especially those of you photographers with "Shots I want to recreate" lists.  What am I missing here?
Mar 24 13 09:03 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Demeter Photography
Posts: 550
Calgary, Alberta, Canada


I Ference Photography wrote:
I've noticed, both on my own photos and on those of other MM members, that one common list theme generally goes along the lines of "Shots I want to recreate", or some variation on this concept.

I understand how this might appeal to a llama to an extent.  Although it would be derivative, it might still add some value to their portfolio in terms of marketing, or perhaps the llama just wants to see herself in a particularly cool scene.

But as a photographer, I must admit I'm stymied.  When I see another photographer's work and am blown away, I might find inspiration in it, but I'd hardly want to replicate it.  Where's the creative energy in imitation?  If I see a gorgeous location in somebody else's photo, I'll appreciate the hell out of it, but I'm not going to seek it out and shoot there - because it's been done.  And even if I walked away with something that the average observer would term "better" than the shot I copied - it's still a shot I copied.  So what's the point?

I'm curious how others feel on this - especially those of you photographers with "Shots I want to recreate" lists.  What am I missing here?

It is like a lot of things in life, you can take an idea or concept you have seen others and put your spin on it, make it your own etc.  Pretty much everything you, and I and everyone else shoots has been done before in some variation or form.

I have no issues with this.

Mar 24 13 09:12 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Joseph William
Posts: 2,002
Chicago, Illinois, US


When I see lists called "I want to re-create" I just pretend they are called "inspiration". Because I think that is what people really mean.
Mar 24 13 09:21 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Erlinda
Posts: 7,036
London, England, United Kingdom


A lot of my photos are listed by other photographers,models,mua,stylist etc in wanting to recreate it... Doesn't bother me any.

My work inspires them enough to want to copy my work and do better then what I've done, it's cool. Go for it, give it your best shot. More then 98% of the time they wont do better then me but how else does one improve if they don't have us better photographers to inspire to.

Copy all you want, if I helped someone get better I feel like I've done something good on here smile
Mar 24 13 09:23 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
MC Photo
Posts: 4,144
New York, New York, US


I Ference Photography wrote:
I've noticed, both on my own photos and on those of other MM members, that one common list theme generally goes along the lines of "Shots I want to recreate", or some variation on this concept.

I understand how this might appeal to a model to an extent.  Although it would be derivative, it might still add some value to their portfolio in terms of marketing, or perhaps the model just wants to see herself in a particularly cool scene.

But as a photographer, I must admit I'm stymied.  When I see another photographer's work and am blown away, I might find inspiration in it, but I'd hardly want to replicate it.  Where's the creative energy in imitation?  If I see a gorgeous location in somebody else's photo, I'll appreciate the hell out of it, but I'm not going to seek it out and shoot there - because it's been done.  And even if I walked away with something that the average observer would term "better" than the shot I copied - it's still a shot I copied.  So what's the point?

I'm curious how others feel on this - especially those of you photographers with "Shots I want to recreate" lists.  What am I missing here?

No one ever succeeds, so it really doesn't matter.

Mar 24 13 09:31 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Daeda1us
Posts: 1,067
Little Rock, Arkansas, US


"Recreating a shot" is a learning experience, in my opinion.

If you are good enough to 'recreate' a shot with little to no effort, then you wouldnt learn much in recreating the shot.

If you are still learning.  If that shot takes you days of research and hours or more of trial and error... then you have learned something.

Learning is the goal, imo.

As a side note, I imagine some models might look through those shots and say, "Oooo!  I would love to do a shot like that!" in which case, they might get some mutually beneficial work out of the effort.

I have looked through model's "shots I want to recreate" lists, looking to see if I think I could reproduce that look.

My two cents, YMMV
Daeda1us
Mar 24 13 09:34 am  Link  Quote 
Model
Heidii Lee
Posts: 3
Winslow, New Jersey, US


Yes agreed! Inspiration is all "liking" those photos really mean. I have an album "shots id love to do" but its strictly me wanting to encorporate an expression or idea into my own style. You are absoultely correct when you ask "what the point is..." on copying the exact image and bringing it into your port. I can understand where you feel accompished that you replicated another photo but at the same time, you then might feel un-original. Again, inspiration is what we should call it!!
Mar 24 13 09:35 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Will Snizek Photography
Posts: 1,387
Beckley, West Virginia, US


I Ference Photography wrote:
I've noticed, both on my own photos and on those of other MM members, that one common list theme generally goes along the lines of "Shots I want to recreate", or some variation on this concept.

I understand how this might appeal to a model to an extent.  Although it would be derivative, it might still add some value to their portfolio in terms of marketing, or perhaps the model just wants to see herself in a particularly cool scene.

But as a photographer, I must admit I'm stymied.  When I see another photographer's work and am blown away, I might find inspiration in it, but I'd hardly want to replicate it.  Where's the creative energy in imitation?  If I see a gorgeous location in somebody else's photo, I'll appreciate the hell out of it, but I'm not going to seek it out and shoot there - because it's been done.  And even if I walked away with something that the average observer would term "better" than the shot I copied - it's still a shot I copied.  So what's the point?

I'm curious how others feel on this - especially those of you photographers with "Shots I want to recreate" lists.  What am I missing here?

To be honest, those kinds of lists bother me and "photos I wish were mine" also kinda sound off to me.  When it comes to photography, I'd never want to re-create someone else's ideas and there's not a desire in my bones to wish someone else's photograph is mine.  I think some people are genuinely using this as a way to compliment others, so I wouldn't jump on them for this, but some out there might actually literally want to re-create someone's work.  I find inspiration in many things I see in life including photography, but the desire to copy is something that's beyond my grasp. 

I have had models in the past ask me to re-create a photo and it's something I morally couldn't do.  In the end, I hope the majority of people with these lists mean no harm.  Sometimes it's nice to assume that and try to forget about how sinister some people really are.

Theft is a form of flattery though.  If you've ever had an idea stolen, you should at least be proud of yourself that you have ideas worth stealing.
It was mentioned above that recreating a shot is a learning experience which is an argument that holds a little weight.  Being completely original is impossible because we're all influenced by life, but when it comes to art, you really should try and find a way to do things your way.  Re-creation might be good for learning core skills but it does very little in developing a style.

Mar 24 13 09:39 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
K E E L I N G
Posts: 39,777
Peoria, Illinois, US


I Ference Photography wrote:
I've noticed, both on my own photos and on those of other MM members, that one common list theme generally goes along the lines of "Shots I want to recreate", or some variation on this concept.

I understand how this might appeal to a llama to an extent.  Although it would be derivative, it might still add some value to their portfolio in terms of marketing, or perhaps the llama just wants to see herself in a particularly cool scene.

But as a photographer, I must admit I'm stymied.  When I see another photographer's work and am blown away, I might find inspiration in it, but I'd hardly want to replicate it.  Where's the creative energy in imitation?  If I see a gorgeous location in somebody else's photo, I'll appreciate the hell out of it, but I'm not going to seek it out and shoot there - because it's been done.  And even if I walked away with something that the average observer would term "better" than the shot I copied - it's still a shot I copied.  So what's the point?

I'm curious how others feel on this - especially those of you photographers with "Shots I want to recreate" lists.  What am I missing here?

I think the best way to help you understand is to point out that practically your whole portfolio was shot in the same place.  Do you feel that after the first time you shot there that everything else was a copy of your original shot?  I doubt it, my guess is you kept going back to the place because you felt like there was more ways for you to shoot the location and you were probably pretty excited about the prospects of what you could do with the place.... despite the fact that you'd already done it.

That's the mindset behind others at locations they see in other peoples pictures and even just themes in other people's pictures.  They are excited about what they feel they can bring to the shot.

Mar 24 13 09:41 am  Link  Quote 
guide forum
Photographer
Rays Fine Art
Posts: 6,070
New York, New York, US


Joseph William  wrote:
When I see lists called "I want to re-create" I just pretend they are called "inspiration". Because I think that is what people really mean.

+1

And as to "recreating" I find that it's impossible to "recreate" anything.  The model's different,  the lighting' different, (how often do you write down the precise settings/placement in case you want to do the shot again at a future date?) my attitude is different, the wardrobe's different.  And that's just inside my own little studio.

Every new shoot is a new opportunity to excell.

Of course, it's also another new opportunity to royally screw it up as well.  sad

All imho as always, of course.

Mar 24 13 09:44 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Ed Woodson Photography
Posts: 2,644
Savannah, Georgia, US


I Ference Photography wrote:
I've noticed, both on my own photos and on those of other MM members, that one common list theme generally goes along the lines of "Shots I want to recreate", or some variation on this concept.

I understand how this might appeal to a model to an extent.  Although it would be derivative, it might still add some value to their portfolio in terms of marketing, or perhaps the model just wants to see herself in a particularly cool scene.

But as a photographer, I must admit I'm stymied.  When I see another photographer's work and am blown away, I might find inspiration in it, but I'd hardly want to replicate it.  Where's the creative energy in imitation?  If I see a gorgeous location in somebody else's photo, I'll appreciate the hell out of it, but I'm not going to seek it out and shoot there - because it's been done.  And even if I walked away with something that the average observer would term "better" than the shot I copied - it's still a shot I copied.  So what's the point?

I'm curious how others feel on this - especially those of you photographers with "Shots I want to recreate" lists.  What am I missing here?

I'm actually quite flattered when one of my images is put in someones "shots I want to recreate" list.

Mar 24 13 09:48 am  Link  Quote 
Body Painter
BodyPainter Rich
Posts: 17,899
Sacramento, California, US


These lists bug me.

Too many times I see images where the paint design is obviously based on something I have done.

Now, I have taken 2-d pinup art and used the design to build a bodypaint from... so I am not at all against using another artists work to influence your own... but if you are taking a photo to try to look like someone else's photo, or a painting to emulate another persons painting, etc... that is kind of lame as anything but an exercise.

Now, if you make a photo that looks like a Picasso painting, or a Van Gogh...  that could be cool. If you do a painting that can look like photo, that can be cool too. But when people proudly list my work as something that they want to make with someone else I sort of want to say "hey, if you like this idea how about you contact ME and we can set it up?!"
Mar 24 13 09:48 am  Link  Quote 
Model
a raw muse
Posts: 3,103
Dighton, Massachusetts, US


(without reading any of the other posts)

I'm ambivalent.

On the one side, imitation is a form of flattery; you inspired someone enough to try something new. Also, even when I'm shooting with 3 other photographers in a room shooting the exact same subject, we all end up with different images; each person's brain is a lens that distorts information from the world, so that alone will morph the end result. Also, when other models say "I want to pose like you", it will look different when they pose; different height, body type, musculature, intent, etc will again morph an original idea.

On the other side, it does strike me as a little lazy at times, if that is the only source of someone's inspiration. Especially while I was dancing, the way for me to come up with "new" moves was to watch anime, fight sequences, butoh; listen to different music; watch the sun rise/set, go for long walks, sleep deprivation, long training days with a crew to break the body and free the mind. I'm much more laid back now I guess, at least in terms of physical exertion, but I'm always sucking stuff into my brain and getting inspiration from everything around me, not just work already done by others.
Mar 24 13 09:50 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
I Ference Photography
Posts: 1,152
Rochester, New York, US


First and foremost, I understand the value of "inspiration" lists; this post isn't about those.  Photographers who do not look at other artists' work for inspiration probably don't exist.  I'm talking about list names that imply that the lister wants to "recreate", "reproduce", or "replicate" a specific image.  That said:

Daeda1us wrote:
"Recreating a shot" is a learning experience, in my opinion.

If you are good enough to 'recreate' a shot with little to no effort, then you wouldnt learn much in recreating the shot.

If you are still learning.  If that shot takes you days of research and hours or more of trial and error... then you have learned something.

Learning is the goal, imo.

As a side note, I imagine some models might look through those shots and say, "Oooo!  I would love to do a shot like that!" in which case, they might get some mutually beneficial work out of the effort.

I have looked through model's "shots I want to recreate" lists, looking to see if I think I could reproduce that look.

My two cents, YMMV
Daeda1us

This is an interesting perspective I hadn't thought of - that a photographer might work to copy another photographer's work in order to learn or hone techniques.  I can see the value in this; studying a photograph for a while to figure out how to imitate the lighting, compo, etc.  So the created work's value then would be the knowledge gained.

Mar 24 13 10:13 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
I Ference Photography
Posts: 1,152
Rochester, New York, US


Will Snizek wrote:
Theft is a form of flattery though.  If you've ever had an idea stolen, you should at least be proud of yourself that you have ideas worth stealing.
It was mentioned above that recreating a shot is a learning experience which is an argument that holds a little weight.  Being completely original is impossible because we're all influenced by life, but when it comes to art, you really should try and find a way to do things your way.  Re-creation might be good for learning core skills but it does very little in developing a style.

I agree that theft (or desire for theft) is a form of flattery, and besides, it's not like a perfect copy is going to be possible.  It's not like I view the people listing my images / the images of others as such offends me; I still appreciate the sentiment.  But the second thing you mention - that re-creation might be good for skills learning, but not for developing an individual style - I think that's an interesting counterpoint to the last post I responded to.  It might help with some technical skills, but it's not going to help an artist find their own unique style and niche.

Mar 24 13 10:15 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
I Ference Photography
Posts: 1,152
Rochester, New York, US


K E E L I N G wrote:
I think the best way to help you understand is to point out that practically your whole portfolio was shot in the same place.

Where on earth are you coming up with this?  My portfolio was shot at:
6 abandoned insane asylums
3 abandoned schools
An abandoned hotel
An abandoned tubercular sanatorium
An abandoned textile mill
An abandoned quarantine island
And a forgotten landfill beach
Spanning from New England to the Deep South.

K E E L I N G wrote:
That's the mindset behind others at locations they see in other peoples pictures and even just themes in other people's pictures.  They are excited about what they feel they can bring to the shot.

Perhaps, but that wasn't what I was discussing; I wasn't getting into "Locations that inspire" lists or anything like that.  I was talking about lists that imply that the lister wants to basically copy another artist's work.

Mar 24 13 10:21 am  Link  Quote 
guide forum
Model
Damianne
Posts: 15,973
Austin, Texas, US


I hate when people contact me with images they're looking to recreate exactly.
No, I'm not interested in that.

Poses, "feels", genres, basic concepts, colors, lighting, etc, yeah totally let's use reference photos or duplicate an element.

Actual photo, why wouldn't I just go work with the photographer who made that photo?
Mar 24 13 10:23 am  Link  Quote 
guide forum
Model
Damianne
Posts: 15,973
Austin, Texas, US


holy crap TP
Mar 24 13 10:23 am  Link  Quote 
guide forum
Model
Damianne
Posts: 15,973
Austin, Texas, US


Mar 24 13 10:23 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Camerosity
Posts: 5,109
Saint Louis, Missouri, US


When I agree to "recreate" a look for a model, I take it to mean that the model would like something along the same lines for her portfolio.

A model has never shown up with clothing that was anywhere near an exact replica of the clothing shown in a "recreate" photo. I try to create a photo with the same or a similar theme or, to use the term that Apple coined, the same overall "look and feel."

The same is true whenever a model wants me to recreate one of my photos.

The original photo is just a starting point - a concept or idea. The end product may have some resemblance to the original, but it's a unique photo. I don't think someone could look at both photos side-by-side and come to the conclusion that one was patterned after the other.
Mar 24 13 10:32 am  Link  Quote 
Model
Kozmina
Posts: 6,533
Colorado Springs, Colorado, US


Damianne wrote:
I hate when people contact me with images they're looking to recreate exactly.
No, I'm not interested in that.

Poses, "feels", genres, basic concepts, colors, lighting, etc, yeah totally let's use reference photos or duplicate an element.

Actual photo, why wouldn't I just go work with the photographer who made that photo?

+1

I have a list of "inspirations". I do not want to re-do them exactly,it's the concept(glow in the dark bodypaint,costumes,crazy hair,social message,etc.),the pose or "mood" that I'd like to "play with".

I really don't think people with "recreate" lists want to actually recreate the exact same photo. I'm sure most of them are simply inspired by what they've seen.

Mar 24 13 11:48 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Fotopia
Posts: 1,095
Atlanta, Georgia, US


I consider the many "help me "recreate" this photographers look", though very common here, still is one of the most amateurish aspects of this site.

Not only is are such requests the polar opposite of creativity, they can also be illegal.

Before the bickering crowd begins the personal attacks, read the Jack Leigh vs Warner Bros trial. It can indeed be illegal to copy an existing copyrighted work.
Mar 24 13 11:51 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
SPRINGHEEL
Posts: 38,184
Gibraltar, Michigan, US


They do it to me all the time and I don't give a shit


Odds are, you can go and look and they never bothered to recreate anything
Mar 24 13 11:55 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
B R U N E S C I
Posts: 25,319
Bath, England, United Kingdom


Joseph William  wrote:
When I see lists called "I want to re-create" I just pretend they are called "inspiration". Because I think that is what people really mean.

+1

Pretty much. Or at least I would hope so.



Just my $0.02

Ciao
Stefano
www.stefanobrunesci.com

Mar 24 13 11:57 am  Link  Quote 
guide forum
Photographer
-JAY-
Posts: 6,510
Las Vegas, Nevada, US


-B-R-U-N-E-S-C-I- wrote:

+1

Pretty much. Or at least I would hope so.



Just my $0.02

Ciao
Stefano
www.stefanobrunesci.com

+1

From the guy with quite a bit of work on my own inspiration list.

Mar 24 13 11:58 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Art Silva
Posts: 9,228
Santa Barbara, California, US


I'm in the same boat. I get inspired but hardly ever want to "copy" someone's work.

I DID when I was a kid looking at famous fashion photographers techniques where I would figure out and copy their style, but that is how I learned the craft roll after roll of film.

I do admit I presently have a couple classic images in mind from Edward Weston and Herb Ritts that I would love to copy.
Mar 24 13 12:05 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Lumatic
Posts: 13,750
Chicago, Illinois, US


I don't disagree on the creativity principle, but there are any number of reasons to imitate.  Maybe they just want to see if they can do it, maybe they want to learn from doing it, etc.  It's not always about creativity.

It can also be said that everything's been done anyway.  Just not in your particular way.
Mar 24 13 02:21 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
IrisSwope
Posts: 14,829
Dallas, Texas, US


I Ference Photography wrote:
I've noticed, both on my own photos and on those of other MM members, that one common list theme generally goes along the lines of "Shots I want to recreate", or some variation on this concept.

I understand how this might appeal to a model to an extent.  Although it would be derivative, it might still add some value to their portfolio in terms of marketing, or perhaps the model just wants to see herself in a particularly cool scene.

But as a photographer, I must admit I'm stymied.  When I see another photographer's work and am blown away, I might find inspiration in it, but I'd hardly want to replicate it.  Where's the creative energy in imitation?  If I see a gorgeous location in somebody else's photo, I'll appreciate the hell out of it, but I'm not going to seek it out and shoot there - because it's been done.  And even if I walked away with something that the average observer would term "better" than the shot I copied - it's still a shot I copied.  So what's the point?

I'm curious how others feel on this - especially those of you photographers with "Shots I want to recreate" lists.  What am I missing here?

I had a model tell me she "looked forward to recreating the images in my portfolio with me"  I just rolled my eyes, and closed the page. I'm not recreating the images in my portfolio....

Mar 24 13 02:23 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
my_other_profile
Posts: 666
Ankeny, Iowa, US


Daeda1us wrote:
"Recreating a shot" is a learning experience, in my opinion.

If you are good enough to 'recreate' a shot with little to no effort, then you wouldnt learn much in recreating the shot.

If you are still learning.  If that shot takes you days of research and hours or more of trial and error... then you have learned something.

Learning is the goal, imo.

As a side note, I imagine some models might look through those shots and say, "Oooo!  I would love to do a shot like that!" in which case, they might get some mutually beneficial work out of the effort.

I have looked through model's "shots I want to recreate" lists, looking to see if I think I could reproduce that look.

My two cents, YMMV
Daeda1us

This.

Mar 24 13 03:49 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
my_other_profile
Posts: 666
Ankeny, Iowa, US


IrisSwope wrote:

I had a model tell me she "looked forward to recreating the images in my portfolio with me"  I just rolled me eyes, and closed the page. I'm not recreating the images in my portfolio....

I am sad that I missed you when I lived in Norman.

Mar 24 13 03:50 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Sleepy Weasel
Posts: 4,583
Castle Rock, Colorado, US


My lawyer has all those people on a watch list for potential infringement, so I'm not worried.
Mar 24 13 04:49 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Vector 38
Posts: 8,296
Austin, Texas, US


I Ference Photography wrote:
What am I missing here?

simply opting out of lists (settings) and moving on.

Mar 24 13 04:56 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
PDF IMAGES PHOTOGRAPHY
Posts: 4,603
Jacksonville, Florida, US


Don't we all at one time try and emulate the greats ! tongue
Mar 24 13 04:58 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Will Snizek Photography
Posts: 1,387
Beckley, West Virginia, US


I Ference Photography wrote:

I agree that theft (or desire for theft) is a form of flattery, and besides, it's not like a perfect copy is going to be possible.  It's not like I view the people listing my images / the images of others as such offends me; I still appreciate the sentiment.  But the second thing you mention - that re-creation might be good for skills learning, but not for developing an individual style - I think that's an interesting counterpoint to the last post I responded to.  It might help with some technical skills, but it's not going to help an artist find their own unique style and niche.

Definitely.  It's good and bad I guess.  Eventually you have to experiment with your own mind and make your own mistakes to get a style.  Also that other guy is out there saying your whole port is one location.  Looks pretty diverse to me.

Mar 24 13 05:00 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
DigitalWorldNY
Posts: 36
Coxsackie, New York, US


I have a list I would like to recreate, but it is the poses mainly. I get inspired by others work. I don't want to recreate it identically.
Mar 24 13 05:03 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Rick Dupuis Photography
Posts: 6,822
Truro, Nova Scotia, Canada


A couple of mine have ended up on lists like that. I always respond with, "Please do it better and let me see it."
On the flip side, Jeffery Scott 1019 has a photo of a female warrior holding a sword. I absolutely love that photo and wanted to do my own version. I ended up shooting a topless, female Darth Vader, and I credited Mr. Scott under the photo and thanked him for the inspiration.
I also once copied a photo exactly and will never ever do it again.
Mar 24 13 07:37 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
exartica
Posts: 1,316
Bowie, Maryland, US


K E E L I N G wrote:
I think the best way to help you understand is to point out that practically your whole portfolio was shot in the same place.
I Ference Photography wrote:
Where on earth are you coming up with this?  My portfolio was shot at:
6 abandoned insane asylums
3 abandoned schools
An abandoned hotel
An abandoned tubercular sanatorium
An abandoned textile mill
An abandoned quarantine island
And a forgotten landfill beach
Spanning from New England to the Deep South.

There is an important lesson for the OP right here.  I wonder if it will occur to him?

Mar 24 13 07:56 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
ShotbyRon
Posts: 767
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, US


Honestly what hasn't been done? No matter what you do..chances are someone else already thought of it. That doesn't mean you should copy exactly what they did. But instead use their idea or location and try to add your own vision to it
Mar 24 13 08:01 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
cinema photography
Posts: 4,384
Mission Viejo, California, US


SPRINGHEEL  wrote:
They do it to me all the time and I don't give a shit


Odds are, you can go and look and they never bothered to recreate anything

Yup.

Sometimes i do check just out of curiosity. Sometimes, in the rare instance they do find inspiration in what I have already done I might even offer a few suggestions for next time. Depending on the image being copied, its rare that the more unique or really outstanding work gets "duplicated" in a meaningful way. Some people could be given everything needed to do an exact copy and still not mange it.

Some of us do our own thing and others do what they think is their own thing or they copy whoever they wanna copy. None of it is worth getting bent over. It just happens

Mar 24 13 08:10 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
ontherocks
Posts: 22,334
Salem, Oregon, US


i've never had an original idea. i don't know if there even is such a thing anymore with billions of people having ideas across the globe. i just get "inspired" by the best people i can find (and they in turn were probably "inspired" by others). i at least try to put my own spin on it.

what i enjoy are 17 year olds who approach with 18+ wish lists. um, no.
Mar 24 13 08:13 pm  Link  Quote 
12last   Search   Reply



main | browse | casting/travel | forums | shout box | help | advertising | contests | share | join the mayhem

more modelmayhem on: | | | edu

©2006-2014 ModelMayhem.com. All Rights Reserved.
MODEL MAYHEM is a registered trademark.
Toggle Worksafe Mode: Off | On
Terms | Privacy | Careers