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Photographer
Kapture OC
Posts: 367
Huntington Beach, California, US


Can anyone tell me how to reversve the effect of the Smart Sharpen tool? 

I used the Smart Sharpen tool in CS5 set at 150% and 0.5px.  I mistakenly applied this setting to an image that I had already sharpenned using the same tool in the past.  After saving it, I notice that the image is "speculated" or overly sharpenned when viewed at certains sizes.

Unsharp Mask does not do this but Smart Sharpen does...

How do I reverse an image that has this issue???

Thanks!!!
Mar 25 13 02:37 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
ME_
Posts: 3,104
Atlanta, Georgia, US


Hmmm, well there are a couple of things that might be going on:

1. When certain sizes are viewed in PS, they do not display correctly. For instance, 16.66, 33.3, 66.6, can look strange. You need to view at 25, 50, 75 or 100%.

2. If you have applied the Smart Sharpen and haven't closed the file yet, then just undo or remove that state from the History. (Of course you will also lose everything performed after that.)

3. If you've already closed, you cannot use Undo nor can you remove a history state. You might be able to counteract the sharpening effect by duping the layer and blurring and then masking in or out where needed.

In the future, you should always sharpen on its own layer, so that you can hide or remove it if necessary even if you've closed the file.

There are different methods but I do my work in the TIFF or PSD and then as a final step Save As my output size and then sharpen that at settings that will vary depending on the intended display size and medium. That way, if I don't like later how it turned out, I just go back to the TIFF and Save As again.
Mar 25 13 02:55 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Rik Williams
Posts: 3,082
Melbourne, Victoria, Australia


I'm fairly certain you can't once the image has been flattened, saved and closed.
Good luck though, next time try sharpening on a separate layer and always back up your work originals prior. Sharpening should only be applied once the image has been sized and finalised.
Mar 25 13 03:04 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Don Garrett
Posts: 4,055
Escondido, California, US


I use NIK sharpener. It doesn't give the artifacts that any application of Photoshop's sharpening tool(s) give(s). I also use it in the MIDDLE of the process, so the edges look more sharp as I increase the local contrast of the whole image. I use the least aggressive setting, and blend it with other layers, so I get no artifacts, and get very sharp looking edges. Photomatix "kicks" the image in the direction of more local contrast, but curves adjustments continues the process, and puts the tonality to where I want it. (gross oversimplification, as usual). Of course, starting with a sharp capture is absolutely manditory. I don't "fix" anything, except for unwanted elements that need "painting" out.
-Don
Mar 25 13 03:15 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Kapture OC
Posts: 367
Huntington Beach, California, US


I tend to favor Unsharp Mask over Smart Sharpen now.  I also work in tiff, converting to jpeg and sharpen is my final step.  Thus, leaving me with a "fresh" edit file in the tiff format...

I was just curious if anyone has a method of reversing the sharpening application after the image was flatten and closed.  It seems like there isn't any way of doing so.

Thank you for your input.
Mar 26 13 09:42 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Light and Lens Studio
Posts: 1,037
Sisters, Oregon, US


Non-destructive editing is a good  practice.  I almost never use the Save button when working with an original image that has been converted to JPG.  After I have edited an image, I use the Save As and give it a slightly different or descriptive name.  I usually keep the image number that was generated by the camera to help identify which original image it is from.  That way the original image is preserved in it's pristine state.  If I make an error on the altered image I can delete it without losing the original.
Mar 26 13 09:53 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Gulag
Posts: 1,138
Duluth, Georgia, US


It really depends on the image but you can try this. Dup the background, and Gaussian Blur it with a well-defined radius value. Add a mask, fill the mask with 50% gray and play with its opacity.
Mar 26 13 10:07 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Don Garrett
Posts: 4,055
Escondido, California, US


Kapture OC wrote:
I tend to favor Unsharp Mask over Smart Sharpen now.  I also work in tiff, converting to jpeg and sharpen is my final step.  Thus, leaving me with a "fresh" edit file in the tiff format...

I was just curious if anyone has a method of reversing the sharpening application after the image was flatten and closed.  It seems like there isn't any way of doing so.

Thank you for your input.

I always save several versions of the same image, the RAW, straight from the camera, the (name + "straight" conversion, TIFF with no adjustments), the one I work on, (usually named descriptively), the (name + "flat version"), made from the following: two versions from Photomatix, (I use the three TIFF conversions in Photomatix to make these), and two conversions to the TIFF format where the exposure slider has been been pushed to the opposite extremes, ("overexposed", and "underexposed" by two stops each), (delete out the white and black pixels from these extreme conversions). I have all the image information, plus some, and can go back and open any of them. I can blend them with the original, or I can start from scratch. It can be time consuming, so I am careful to do it right the first time. As I said in my previous post, I use NIK sharpener, diluted, and in the middle of the process. I hate some of the artifacts I see from various filters so I use them with caution, blend them with other versions, or don't use them at all.
  Another good technique is to make a duplicate of any one of these images, and do the adjustments on that one, leaving the original untouched. You can drag that adjustment on top of the named version, and use it, or not, as you see fit. (name this new layer so you know what it is and what you have done to it, take it's opacity down, merge it with the "old" layer, or, whatever !).
-Don
Too much information for one post, and I didn't even get into the curves and other adjustments.

Mar 26 13 10:08 am  Link  Quote 
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