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Model
--Ishtar--
Posts: 1,254
Heerlen, Limburg, Netherlands


"Can you be more Pacific?"
(Sure, hang on a second while I grab my coconut bra)
Mar 31 13 10:46 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Vivus Hussein Denuo
Posts: 64,117
New York, New York, US


Drew Smith Photography wrote:
Okay, here's a couple of interesting ones, be honest and put your hand up if you misuse these, I will admit to doing so:

Enormity - meaning 'enormous' right? Nope; it means 'extreme evil'.

and

Chronic - meaning 'very bad' right? Nope; it means 'long term'.

According to dictionary.com, one of the meanings of "enormity" is "greatness of size, scope, extent, or influence; immensity."  But thanks for informing us that another meaning is extreme evil.  I hadn't known that.

Mar 31 13 11:21 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
NothingIsRealButTheGirl
Posts: 33,182
Los Angeles, California, US


The Space Cowboy wrote:
"Wherefore art thou Romeo?" means "Why are you Romeo?"

Not "Where are you?"

JOEL McDONALD wrote:
http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/262200.html

You found a supporting link! Fantastic! Thank you!

big_smile

Mar 31 13 11:26 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
NothingIsRealButTheGirl
Posts: 33,182
Los Angeles, California, US


EvaScarlet wrote:
Hey, fuck if I know...

(which, coincidentally, doesn't make much sense either...but it's gratifying to say, damn it!!!)

K I C K H A M wrote:
I think that expression has a logic base.

It means that it you know, you get rewarded by sex.

And if you don't know, then no sex for you.

Damned if I know.

Mar 31 13 11:28 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Vivus Hussein Denuo
Posts: 64,117
New York, New York, US


"Lie" and "lay" seem to be more commonly mis-used than correctly used.

"Lie" is intransitive.  It doesn't take an object:  "I'm going to lie down for a while."

"Lay" is transitive.  It does take an object:  "I will lay the hammer on the bench."

However, to make matters more confusing, the past tense of "lie" is "lay":  "Usually, after lunch, I lie down for a while."  BUT:  "Yesterday, after lunch, I lay down for a while."

So, if someone says, "I'm going to go lay down," ask him or her, "Exactly what are you going to lay down?"  smile

And don't get me started on "wake."  Hardly anyone can correctly conjugate it.  smile
Mar 31 13 11:45 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Imagesby Photography
Posts: 290
Baltimore, Maryland, US


When someone says, "blue in color"   

Can it be blue in something else?

Ink pen.

Is there an ink pencil?

I was robbed in my house!

Robbery is with a weapon, or the threat of harm.

Burglary is when someone comes into your house to steal.

I borrowed him the money. 

No, you lent him the money and he borrowed it from you.

When people mix up infured and implied!

Too many more to write! LOL
Mar 31 13 12:50 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Orca Bay Images
Posts: 32,233
Lodi, California, US


Imagesby Photography wrote:
When people mix up infured inferred and implied!

Fixed that for you.

Ink pen.
Is there an ink pencil?

No, but there are different kinds of pens.

Mar 31 13 01:07 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
GeM Photographic
Posts: 2,367
Chicago, Illinois, US


Ink pen.
Is there an ink pencil?

Orca Bay Images wrote:
No, but there are different kinds of pens.

The company which makes "Sharpie" markers sells a liquid graphite pencil, so it qualifies as an ink pencil (since it writes like a pen and erases like a conventional pencil).


I hate it when people use forms of "go" when retelling conversions (in place of "said").

Mar 31 13 01:52 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Vivus Hussein Denuo
Posts: 64,117
New York, New York, US


GeM Photographic wrote:

Ink pen.
Is there an ink pencil?

The company which makes "Sharpie" markers sells a liquid graphite pencil, so it qualifies as an ink pencil (since it writes like a pen and erases like a conventional pencil).


I hate it when people use forms of "go" when retelling conversions (in place of "said").

Even worse, IMO, is "like":

"So, I'm like 'What happened?'  So, she's like, 'I don't know.'  So, I'm like, 'Weren't you there?'  So, she's like, "Yeah, but I was passed out.'"

It's not just slang for "said."  The "I'm like" construction leaves it vague as to whether the person said the words or merely thought them, e.g., "So, I'm like WTF?"

Mar 31 13 02:03 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Orca Bay Images
Posts: 32,233
Lodi, California, US


GeM Photographic wrote:
I hate it when people use forms of "go" when retelling conversions (in place of "said").

That makes me cringe. Same for "was like," as Vivus mentioned.

Mar 31 13 02:10 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Jay Farrell
Posts: 13,082
Nashville, Tennessee, US


Plus size or "petite" modeling. Plus size or full figured does NOT mean fat, and petite means slight, not short. lol
Mar 31 13 02:11 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Sam Comer Photography
Posts: 2,589
Knoxville, Tennessee, US


"Dilemma" is not just any problem. It's a problem that involves two choices, neither being acceptable.

"My car broke down and I don't have the money to fix it" is a problem, not a dilemma.

"If I go to my sister's wedding, I'll have to see my ex who I hate. If I don't go, I will upset my sister" is a dilemma.

Also, I know people who reverse "bring" and "take."

"Can you take me that beer, please?" or "This shirt doesn't fit. I'm going to bring it back to the store."

Another is "disillusioned." A lot of people use it to very incorrectly mean "deluded" or "delusional," as in, "She believes in all that crap. She is so disillusioned." In this case, disillusioned pretty much means the exact opposite of how it is used.
Mar 31 13 02:58 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
ChrisFischerPhotography
Posts: 852
Otsego, Minnesota, US


"Her vocabulary was as bad as, like, whatever."
Mar 31 13 03:13 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
EvaScarlet
Posts: 6,250
Los Angeles, California, US


K I C K H A M wrote:

I think that expression has a logic base.

It means that it you know, you get rewarded by sex.

And if you don't know, then no sex for you.

lol lol lol

Mar 31 13 03:58 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
EvaScarlet
Posts: 6,250
Los Angeles, California, US


You just reminded me of another one:
wink

Sam Comer Photography wrote:
"If I go to my sister's wedding, I'll have to see my ex whom I hate. If I don't go, I will upset my sister" is a dilemma.

Mar 31 13 04:02 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
NothingIsRealButTheGirl
Posts: 33,182
Los Angeles, California, US


nonplussed
Mar 31 13 04:44 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
GeM Photographic
Posts: 2,367
Chicago, Illinois, US


Vivus Hussein Denuo wrote:
Even worse, IMO, is "like":

"So, I'm like 'What happened?'  So, she's like, 'I don't know.'  So, I'm like, 'Weren't you there?'  So, she's like, "Yeah, but I was passed out.'"

It's not just slang for "said."  The "I'm like" construction leaves it vague as to whether the person said the words or merely thought them, e.g., "So, I'm like WTF?"

QFT

Mar 31 13 05:31 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
matt-h2
Posts: 523
Oakland, California, US


This thread warms the cockles of my heart.

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/warm_the … %27s_heart
Mar 31 13 05:39 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
37photog
Posts: 692
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, US


Libary.
Mar 31 13 08:02 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Orca Bay Images
Posts: 32,233
Lodi, California, US


Worse and worst.

X is the worse of the two choices.

X is the worst of the three (or more) choices.
Mar 31 13 09:04 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Vivus Hussein Denuo
Posts: 64,117
New York, New York, US


Affect and effect.
Mar 31 13 09:13 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Orca Bay Images
Posts: 32,233
Lodi, California, US


Vivus Hussein Denuo wrote:
Affect and effect.

Though I know the diff, I still occasionally get hung up for a split second on which to use.

It's like "I before E except after C," which constantly confuses me for a few hundred milliseconds.

Mar 31 13 09:20 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
K I C K H A M
Posts: 14,632
Los Angeles, California, US


Orca Bay Images wrote:
Worse and worst.

X is the worse of the two choices.

X is the worst of the three (or more) choices.

Ugh. I saw this today.

I really hate it.

Mar 31 13 09:29 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Drew Smith Photography
Posts: 5,209
Nottingham, England, United Kingdom


Orca Bay Images wrote:

Though I know the diff, I still occasionally get hung up for a split second on which to use.

It's like "I before E except after C," which constantly confuses me for a few hundred milliseconds.

I'm impressed that you can determine the duration of your confusion down to hundredths of a second. tongue

Here's one: 'I can't start doing that because it'll set a president.'

Apr 01 13 02:04 am  Link  Quote 
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Photographer
Justin
Posts: 21,804
Fort Collins, Colorado, US


Never mind. I just wanted to verify that I was correct, and in looking it up, it's not as simple as I made it. Maybe I'll come back to this later.
Apr 01 13 05:21 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Drew Smith Photography
Posts: 5,209
Nottingham, England, United Kingdom


Damianne wrote:
Anyways
I wish I was
If I was
Offsides

'offsides'? What's that then?

I shall presume it isn't a reference to one of the most complicated rules in the Beautiful Game.

Apr 01 13 05:30 am  Link  Quote 
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Model
Damianne
Posts: 15,975
Austin, Texas, US


Drew Smith Photography wrote:

'offsides'? What's that then?

I shall presume it isn't a reference to one of the most complicated rules in the Beautiful Game.

Offsides isn't anything because one is either onside or offside.
Hardly complicated. HARDLY.

Apr 01 13 05:38 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Wildcat Photography
Posts: 1,486
Valparaiso, Indiana, US


Sam Comer Photography wrote:
Also, I know people who reverse "bring" and "take."

"Can you take me that beer, please?" or "This shirt doesn't fit. I'm going to bring it back to the store."

For sure.

I remember when I moved to Minnesota as a kid and at school kids would ask:

"Would you borrow me a dollar?"

(WTF?)

My response was usually, "I do not think that is possible."
(Smiles...and walk away...)

Wildcat

Apr 01 13 08:34 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
C h a r l e s D
Posts: 9,304
Los Angeles, California, US


Orca Bay Images wrote:

Though I know the diff, I still occasionally get hung up for a split second on which to use.

It's like "I before E except after C," which constantly confuses me for a few hundred milliseconds.

My Mom often said, "Either leisured foreigner seized the heifer on the weird height" so I could remember some of the exceptions to that rule.

Apr 01 13 08:54 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
C h a r l e s D
Posts: 9,304
Los Angeles, California, US


Buffalo for Bison is infuriating, but it seems, only to me.  No native buffalo exist in these United States.

This is a bison:
http://t2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRGN90sG6SobPVOEgZEU4K71p_d18b_oSRelRJHp0NfkgIXLjdF

THIS is a buffalo:
http://t2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRqXrxv4vTXUGGZyxd9nLl4I1ljaspBirXi3O14E1DS2vA_Nrq5Tg
Apr 01 13 08:56 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
DevilMayCare Photo
Posts: 430
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada


'Respect' and 'disrespect' since people often say 'I want respect' when they mean 'I want to be feared.' And 'don't disrespect me' when they mean 'don't criticize or contradict me in even the most innocent or casual manner.'
Apr 01 13 09:15 am  Link  Quote 
guide forum
Photographer
Justin
Posts: 21,804
Fort Collins, Colorado, US


C h a r l e s  D wrote:
Buffalo for Bison is infuriating, but it seems, only to me.  No native buffalo exist in these United States.

Yeah, I don't think you'll get others to share in that level of indignation. From Wikipedia:

"The term "buffalo" is sometimes considered to be a misnomer for this animal, as it is only distantly related to either of the two "true buffalo", the Asian water buffalo and the African buffalo. However, "bison" is a Greek word meaning ox-like animal, while "buffalo" originated with the French fur trappers who called these massive beasts bœufs, meaning ox or bullock—so both names, "bison" and "buffalo", have a similar meaning. Though the name "Bison" might be considered to be more scientifically correct, as a result of standard usage the name "Buffalo" is also considered correct and is listed in many dictionaries as an acceptable name for American Buffalo or bison. In reference to this animal, the term "buffalo" dates to 1635 in North American usage when the term was first recorded for the American mammal. It thus has a much longer history than the term "bison", which was first recorded in 1774."

I'm sorry you don't like it, but it's an acceptable usage. The maned wolf is not a wolf. The red panda is not a bear. So it goes sometimes.

Apr 01 13 02:05 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Orca Bay Images
Posts: 32,233
Lodi, California, US


C h a r l e s  D wrote:
My Mom often said, "Either leisured foreigner seized the heifer on the weird height" so I could remember some of the exceptions to that rule.

lol

At the Comet Tavern in Seattle, the back rooms were done up in bare drywall and felt-tip markers were available for patrons to write or draw on the walls.

I once saw on a wall, "I before E except after C." Below it, someone else wrote, "Weird."

Apr 01 13 02:15 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Orca Bay Images
Posts: 32,233
Lodi, California, US


Orca Bay Images wrote:
It's like "I before E except after C," which constantly confuses me for a few hundred milliseconds.

Drew Smith Photography wrote:
I'm impressed that you can determine the duration of your confusion down to hundredths of a second. tongue

Five hundred milliseconds isn't too tough to gauge. Ten hundreds of milliseconds, even easier.

Apr 01 13 02:20 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Orca Bay Images
Posts: 32,233
Lodi, California, US


Orca Bay Images wrote:
Worse and worst.

X is the worse of the two choices.

X is the worst of the three (or more) choices.

K I C K H A M wrote:
Ugh. I saw this today.

I really hate it.

Last week I heard a local TV newscaster -- might have been a sports commentator -- misuse "worse/worst." Teeth-grinding time.

Apr 01 13 02:23 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
DevilMayCare Photo
Posts: 430
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada


Photo specific: Referring to a zoom lens as X-by-Y instead of X-to-Y makes my teeth freakin' hurt.
Apr 02 13 04:04 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Sam Comer Photography
Posts: 2,589
Knoxville, Tennessee, US


DevilMayCare Photo wrote:
Photo specific: Referring to a zoom lens as X-by-Y instead of X-to-Y makes my teeth freakin' hurt.

+1

Likewise, "I have three or four lens."

LENSES!

Apr 02 13 04:40 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Vivus Hussein Denuo
Posts: 64,117
New York, New York, US


Wildcat Photography wrote:

For sure.

I remember when I moved to Minnesota as a kid and at school kids would ask:

"Would you borrow me a dollar?"

(WTF?)

My response was usually, "I do not think that is possible."
(Smiles...and walk away...)

Wildcat

If the Minnesotans in question were of German heritage, which is entirely possible in the upper midwest, that might explain it.  The German cognate of English "borrow" is "borgen."  However, "borgen" can mean both to lend and to borrow.  And, in fact, I once met a woman from Germany who made exactly that mistake.  She asked if I could borrow her my eyeglasses.

So, that's pretty confusing, so the mistake is forgiveable.

Apr 02 13 05:36 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Cheyenne Lutek
Posts: 74
New York, New York, US


I just hate it when people pronounce "water" wrong. I know it's not a saying or a phrase, but I think pronouncing English WORDS wrong is definitely worse than getting the sentence wrong.

Biggest pet peeve.

"This wudder is so refreshing."
"I want some wooder, I'm so thirsty."

I'll give ya a goddamn log.


And then then THEN when people here say, "Let's go DOWN to the shore!"

The beach isn't South of my location, it's East. Down?? It's... beneath us? Did you mean in the Earth's crust? You might have to drive then, because I don't know how to go "down" there.
Apr 02 13 08:01 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Kincaid Blackwood
Posts: 23,364
Atlanta, Georgia, US


The 21st century bastardization of the words "win" and "fail" come to mind…
Apr 02 13 08:25 pm  Link  Quote 
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