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Photographer
LABoudoir
Posts: 2
Los Angeles, California, US


Hey everyone.  I have been a primarily a headshot photographer for the past couple of years and decided to branch out and do more stuff.  A few friends expressed interest in some Maxim/Victorias secret style shoots so I have been exploring different things to see what I could come up with. Would love feedback on where I am at so far, as well as tips/suggestions/tricks for future shoots!!! Thanks for your time!
Apr 03 13 05:10 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Albertex Photography
Posts: 15,113
Mansfield, Texas, US


Critique:
Ask here, but be ready for full brutal honesty or opinions.  http://www.modelmayhem.com/t.php?forum_id=8
Apr 03 13 06:19 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
AJ_In_Atlanta
Posts: 12,699
Atlanta, Georgia, US


Forum allowed advice: 

Being a male makes business success difficult, my wife and I do well because we are a husband wife team and she is the point of contact for clients.

Who are the clients?  Most are not young models, you should shoot middle aged models as they tend to be more relatable to clients.  If you also do wedding boudoir then a few younger girls are OK, especially in any marketing directed at them.

Lastly also on the client side, get good a shooting less then perfect bodies.  Learn how to pose them, use a very shallow depth of field at times, learn angles.

More if this is moved to the other forums and I an check out your portfolio
Apr 03 13 06:29 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Innovative Imagery
Posts: 2,815
Los Angeles, California, US


If you are going to offer to do this for money, spend some money and get trained.  Many books, videos and classes on the subject by many people.  Christa Meola and Sue Bryce to name two.
Apr 03 13 06:35 pm  Link  Quote 
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Photographer
GPS Studio Services
Posts: 35,514
San Francisco, California, US


AJScalzitti wrote:
Being a male makes business success difficult, my wife and I do well because we are a husband wife team and she is the point of contact for clients.

+1 ... I have a woman photographer on staff just for that reason.  She is the point contact with the women clients (and men, as well).  I get involved with lighting, props, composition, etc.  With my background, I am presented as the "consultant" to the shoot.  It is no secret that I am the studio owner.

She does the shooting though, with my guidance.  The clients are fine with that, but having a female in the lead is important.

Apr 03 13 06:49 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Erick Blink
Posts: 396
Burbank, California, US


Welcome to MM.
Apr 03 13 09:28 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
C A Bridges
Posts: 165
Orange City, Florida, US


You are exactly where I am smile. Been taking concert and other event pics, but friends have been asking me for portraits and boudoir so I'm learning fast. The main reason I started at MM this week, in fact, was to benefit from others' experience and begin working with models to build up my skills.

It's not just knowing your camera and lighting well enough that you can focus on directing the model, although that's certainly necessary. There's a definite knack to directing him/her well to display confidence and assurance, and that's what I'm hoping to find.
Apr 04 13 07:06 am  Link  Quote 
Admin
CleeIB
Posts: 3,948
Los Angeles, California, US


Just adding that discussion (and searching) within the Photography Talk forum may benefit OP:

http://www.modelmayhem.com/t.php?forum_id=2

Welcome to the Mayhem!
Apr 04 13 10:51 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
C A Bridges
Posts: 165
Orange City, Florida, US


I started a discussion here -- http://www.modelmayhem.com/po.php?thread_id=886847 -- for my own specific needs, but I include a few links to some excellent advice and there's more piling up in that one.
Apr 04 13 05:31 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Moonlight Studio
Posts: 41
Hot Springs, Arkansas, US


AJScalzitti wrote:
Forum allowed advice: 

Being a male makes business success difficult, my wife and I do well because we are a husband wife team and she is the point of contact for clients.

Who are the clients?  Most are not young models, you should shoot middle aged models as they tend to be more relatable to clients.  If you also do wedding boudoir then a few younger girls are OK, especially in any marketing directed at them.

Lastly also on the client side, get good a shooting less then perfect bodies.  Learn how to pose them, use a very shallow depth of field at times, learn angles.

More if this is moved to the other forums and I an check out your portfolio

damn good advice, thanks!

Apr 06 13 04:34 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
ontherocks
Posts: 22,348
Salem, Oregon, US


boudoir is all about angles. it takes patience to find the right ones. shallow DOF can be your friend but it's hard shooting at f1.4 with 320W strobes (too much strobe power).

there are several different styles of boudoir. sue bryce does more of what used to be glamour shots in the mall. christa meola shoots like she's the model's lover.  there's a dark, moody, voyeuristic style and more of a men's magazine glamour style. take your pick.

here are some shots we've taken (a mix of models and real customers). the wife and i work together and lately she has been doing much of the shooting (especially the implied nudes with paying customers):
http://www.oregonboudoir.com/?page_id=24

around here the sue bryce style and pin-ups are popular. both those styles are pretty much PG-rated (not really what i would call boudoir). pin-ups can use help from a MUA.

don't be surprised if you wind up with 60+ ladies and BBWs. they aren't all model-types.

partner with a MUA and get a customer to invite her girlfriends and do a shooting party at a hotel.
Apr 06 13 04:58 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Carle Photography
Posts: 9,227
Oakland, California, US


I've been running a Boudoir studio for several years now, so here is some general business advice.

1. Learn what your CLIENTS want, they are the ones paying the rent. If a client als up and asks for a certain style then shoot it. If your client gives you an idea that you personally might not like, shoot it. If your client loves green, sue green...

2. Yes, you can guide and give the clients advice I do every day, but in the end THEY have a vision and you need to keep them happy.

3. Get deposits, clients are not clients until they have paid a deposit, and are on the calendar in ink.

4. Time: Pay attention to it. On average for a 20 finished photo session, I know it will take on average 10-16 hours.

Booking intro & deposit 1 hour
Shoot & proof 4 hours
Retouching 4-10 hours
Client pick up & delivery 1 hour
Make sure you price your work based on YOUR known timeframe.
(some clients are faster, others are slower.)

5. Start simple with a few pre set packages that are VERY well explained and understood by BOTH you and the client. Go over in detail what the client gets to go home with. How long it will take to do the shoot as well as deliver the images. Some clients need photos delivered in 24 hours others can wait 2 weeks. Some clients need prints, others need web sized files...

www.bayareaboudoir.com
Apr 06 13 05:56 pm  Link  Quote 
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