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Model
M A U I
Posts: 1,587
Harare, Harare, Zimbabwe


I don't like meeting for tea, I would come for beer though.
Apr 20 13 09:42 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
the lonely photographer
Posts: 1,875
Beverly Hills, California, US


Reading some of the comments the llamas post, it appears they just want to get it over with,  take the money and run, dunno about how the others feel , photographers. ... I like to build relationships. And network the llamas, wardrobe, designers and help each other out.
So far it's been working out pretty good. There are a gazillion llamas out there,  There's a winner  out there for every one that ignored me . I have plenty to work with,  was a time I couldn't get a mannequin to llama for me. What the hell, it's all good..
Apr 20 13 10:01 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Dan K Photography
Posts: 5,409
STATEN ISLAND, New York, US


most people here who are for these meetings seem to have very simple basic shoots. I don't get what you guys are discussing that a one sentence email wouldn't work just as well.

Not that I am making fun of you guys. All my stuff is the same.
Apr 20 13 10:52 am  Link  Quote 
Model
allison mindy
Posts: 1,495
New York, New York, US


I think most experienced models and photographers would agree with you. It's a waste of everyone's time.
Apr 20 13 10:57 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Mortonovich II
Posts: 705
San Diego, California, US


I ask to lend a hand changing the oil on my truck first, instead of tea.  Weeds out the riff raff.
Apr 20 13 11:05 am  Link  Quote 
Model
Jordan Bunniie
Posts: 1,643
Los Angeles, California, US


John Jebbia wrote:

I didn't like talking to you on the phone. You got my ear all wet.

bunny

Apr 20 13 11:31 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
JOEL McDONALD
Posts: 608
Portland, Oregon, US


I did it twice and neither time did the shoot happen even though the pre-shoot meeting went very well.

Won't do them again. If it's a TF shoot there's little need. If it's a paid shoot with an unknown model then a test shoot works well.
Apr 20 13 01:36 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
K E E L I N G
Posts: 39,777
Peoria, Illinois, US


Never done it, and no one's ever asked me to do it.  I'm quite frankly amazed when I hear other people do it.
Apr 20 13 01:58 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Jean Renard Photography
Posts: 2,044
Los Angeles, California, US


Perhaps not quite the "tea" meeting you are thinking of but as I read this it seems most everyone thinks meeting talent in advance of a shoot is a waste of time.

That is actually a bit narrow minded for anything other than a low end or obvious jobs.

I'm siding with all those who are in favor of a casting process since in the real world jobs, there are go-sees, casting calls, call backs, in acting/tv work there are table reads, producer sessions.  On major projects in film, tv and in print a talent meeting is often inevitable unless everyone knows each other.

Pre-production meetings can be useful.  Always good to master that process.  The number of people who suck at this process is unreal.
Apr 20 13 04:54 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
ChristerArt
Posts: 2,861
Cambridge, England, United Kingdom


I got a message, asking me to post this. Remembering it from a thread years ago (and boy, did a lot of guys get their dicks in a knot in that thread), he said it fits very well in this thread as there clearly are two factions in the thread - those who shoot "straight up and down without any preparation or care little about the final image(s)" and "those who make every effort in producing their images".

He said: "Seems there are the Image TAKERS and the Image MAKERS - and this attitude fits equally well with models."



Well known Professional Photographer Frederic Neema:


This is what I recently used with an out-of-state client in a negotiation process for a corporate job where I was against local WFH (Work For Hire) shooters at $1,400/day. My fees were $12,000 for two days plus digital fees and travel expenses.


Image Takers versus Image Makers...

There are two kinds of photographers: the Image Takers and the Image makers.


The Image Takers are the photographers who record whatever happens to be in  front of their lens. If you sell ketchup, they will record the exact shape of the bottle and its red color. If you sell cars, they will show every single technical detail of the hero car. If your company is located in a high-rise building, they will record the total height with all the details in the windows. If your CEO is short, they will show it.

They will record all the details but don't ask them to make your ketchup appear appetizing, your cars look sexy, your company feel successful or your CEO look like a world leader.

They are just image recorders who probably charge by the day, half day or hour and don't care about the rest.

The Image Makers are the ones who actually sell your product or image. They go beyond the recording phase and have a gift to trigger desire, interest, love, surprise and other human emotions through the images they create.

These emotions sell!

These photographers have a talent and a vision that is unique to each of them and that is highly valuable to their clients. They would be crazy not to make money from this creative gift and talent that they have and this is exactly what they do: they charge according to the value of their images. The more valuable an image is, the more the client will want to use it. This is why they charge per usage.

If you are trying to find an Image maker at the price of an Image taker, you are probably wasting your time. The good and experienced ones know their value and charge per usage.

These Image Makers can offer you what you really need at a price that is probably very well proportioned to your total marketing and advertising budget.

In most cases, it makes more sense to hire this type of photographer to create the images that will sell your product or image. And always remember that talent sells."

I got the job,

Frederic Neema
Apr 21 13 02:44 am  Link  Quote 
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Photographer
Robb Mann
Posts: 10,275
Baltimore, Maryland, US


M A U I wrote:
I don't like meeting for tea, I would come for beer though.

Years ago I met a model (at her request) for a beer to discuss a shoot. After about 3 minutes I realized she was rather crazy. I never shot with her. A friend of mine also met her for beer, and did shoot with her. It was a huge cluster-Fck. To this day he says it was his worst shoot.

So, meeting with people or not, you still have to be able to assess how well you think you can work with someone else.

Apr 21 13 04:51 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
glumpy
Posts: 516
Sydney, New South Wales, Australia


Seems Ironic the consensus being given in this thread. Whenever anyone mentions a flake model  or anything else, the soft of heart and head all advise pre shoot meetings. Seems the majority of people don't like them though.

FFS, if it isn't good enough just to turn up for the shoot and discuss things by email or over the phone, then forget it. 90% or more of the shoots done through sites like this are just mutual collaborations  for private use and are about as basic organisationally as it gets.

I don't have the time to be stuffing round talking about what I have already clearly explained in a contact or casting.

When I look back at the 3 best internet models I ever worked with, I recall they were also the fastest, easiest and straightforward to arrange ever.  I remember sending one girl a message, she got back to me in about 2 min saying that sounded great, nominated a day in the next week I had suggested, I said fine, she said great and the next time I spoke to her was when she called me to tell me she was at the station ( early) and would wait for me to pick her up.

Could not have been simpler and that girl will always be remembered by me as one of the nicest people I met and one of the most capable models ( I was her 2nd ever shoot) I ever worked with. Geez I wish she would hurry up and come back here to live!

Worked with another Champion model last week.
All done and dusted in 5 emails, no crap about meetings, worrying about what the boyfriend might think,  escorts, references or anything else. I thought she was brilliant, she seems stoked with the pics and we are planning another shoot at a different location within the next week.
This model was 30 years old although I thought she was about 22 by her looks.

Maybe the solution to a lot of these problems is work with people who are grown up and don't have a bunch of insecurities they need mummy to hold their hand over?

I have done the pre shoot meeting thing years back and it was usually a huge waste of time.  Inevitably they moaned they didn't have transport so I had to go to buggery out of my way, they turned up late and then after telling me at the meeting how excited they were to shoot, ended up giving me some stupid excuse why they couldn't some days later.

These days If  a model asks to meet before hand, it will be at the coffee shop that is the closest one to me and I'll leave when she rings to tell me she has ordered the first round.
Other than that, sorry. If it's too complicated or you think I might be an axe murderer, best work with some other GWC that will pander to your insecurities cause I don't have the patience to make mountains out of Mole hills.
Apr 21 13 06:36 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Cupcake Paparazzi
Posts: 434
Los Angeles, California, US


Wynd Mulysa wrote:
For what it's worth, I do.  My schedule is pretty crazy and I try hard to schedule every shoot I can.  Taking 30 minutes out of my day to meet with a new photographer to have tea somewhere kind of seems pointless and like I could be doing something more efficient with my time.  What could be said over tea that couldn't be said over email or the phone?  I understand that the photographer may want to make sure I actually look like I do in my portfolio, or get a feel of my personality...  But could he just check my references and talk to me on the phone?

A long time ago, photographers would meet up with me with a printed portfolio.  That was the day.  But now, with so many photos online, I don't need to see a printed portfolio to know if I want to work with someone.  I have already agreed to work with them by that point, anyway.

So..  Who likes meeting in person pre-shoot and why?  Do you think it's actually necessary?

I'm used to MODELS suggesting this... does this mean they're trying to take me out?  lol   >.>

Apr 21 13 08:02 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
DougBPhoto
Posts: 37,966
Portland, Oregon, US


John Jebbia wrote:

I didn't like talking to you on the phone. You got my ear all wet.

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-8XfW1sGUmgs/TbGbg4TjoyI/AAAAAAAACdQ/AbTAfwyvVNc/s1600/mary+2.jpg

Wait a minute, I think I saw that movie...  is this you??   ^^^^^^^^

Apr 21 13 08:46 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
TomFRohwer
Posts: 620
Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany


the lonely photographer wrote:
Reading some of the comments the models post, it appears they just want to get it over with,  take the money and run

They are expected to do so...
We're talking about photography, not therapy.

... I like to build relationships. And network the models, wardrobe, designers and help each other out.

Networking follows work done. It does not precede work to do.

Apr 21 13 09:13 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
the lonely photographer
Posts: 1,875
Beverly Hills, California, US


TomFRohwer wrote:

They are expected to do so...
We're talking about photography, not therapy.


Networking follows work done. It does not precede work to do.

I network the models beforehand getting them fitted for wardrobe with the designers, work with the  MUAHS for the looks, the stylists define the shoot parameters. Then everybody is on board during the shoot. I find this works very well. If the model thinks its not necessary or a waste of time, so do I. NEXT!

Apr 21 13 10:21 am  Link  Quote 
Retoucher
Alex Damianidis
Posts: 3
Toronto, Ontario, Canada


sadly a lot of people say they will show up for a shoot but never do. as an new art director starting up... i set up the meeting as a test for reliability and character alone. if you cant take an hour to be there for a meeting and be polite you aint worth a dime!
industry pros i would bet either charge for that meeting time since its valuable or just take the next job in line that doesnt do that.
Apr 21 13 04:01 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Patrick Walberg
Posts: 42,580
Salinas, California, US


Alex Damianidis wrote:
sadly a lot of people say they will show up for a shoot but never do. as an new art director starting up... i set up the meeting as a test for reliability and character alone. if you cant take an hour to be there for a meeting and be polite you aint worth a dime!
industry pros i would bet either charge for that meeting time since its valuable or just take the next job in line that doesnt do that.

People used to go to casting calls.  I'm old school in that I like to meet in person.  However, I know it's not always possible.  I use multiple methods of communication in vetting potential models and that is why hardly anyone ever flakes on me.

There are people on here with FAKE profiles.  I do insist on exchanging email addresses, phone numbers and talking on the phone.  Sometimes I do meet in person.  However, I've never had a FAKE profile exchange phone numbers with me.

Apr 21 13 04:28 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Art of the nude
Posts: 11,864
Olivet, Michigan, US


TomFRohwer wrote:
Networking follows work done. It does not precede work to do.

Networking CREATES work.

And, yes, I've gotten referrals from people who I hadn't worked with yet.  On occasion, I've even gotten references from people I haven't worked with yet.

Apr 21 13 07:51 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Big A-Larger Than Life
Posts: 33,407
The Woodlands, Texas, US


M Pandolfo Photography wrote:

The term "Meet & Greet" is often a misrepresentation. A more apt name would be Meet "the bored people who need an excuse to get out of the house and have a drink once a month without being nagged by their significant others" & Greet.

The only M&G I ever attended looked like Divorcee Night at the Ramada Inn.

ROFLMFAO!!!!!!!

Apr 21 13 09:09 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Rob Photosby
Posts: 2,501
Brisbane, Queensland, Australia


I LOVE suggestions for a pre-shoot meeting, because they are a nearly foolproof indicator that the model is not worth working with.

Moreover, you don't have to actually have the meeting.  All you need is for the model to suggest one to know exactly what to do, i.e. NEXT!!
Apr 23 13 07:02 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Erlinda
Posts: 7,036
London, England, United Kingdom


If I am going to shoot with a MM model I have them come over to the studio/flat and to a quick go sees.. If I am working with agency girls I just give the agent time and date and the model shows up ready to work.

I like to do go sees because more then half the time models on MM don't look like they do in their portfolio. I also like doing go sees because it's just me and the model no team etc (which makes it more relaxing).

If I'm bored and want to shoot I also contact a few agencies and ask them to send over a few girls for a go see. Give them time and place and we shoot. All good

I don't do go sees to talk about shoots I do go sees to shoot for the hell of it with just me and the model big_smile
Apr 23 13 11:42 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
NTN Photo
Posts: 98
Baltimore, Maryland, US


I'm simply too busy for a bunch of random pre shoot meetings that may never go anywhere. Emails, phone calls, or texts are plenty fine for pre shoot planning and don't eat up a ton of time. What if everyone wanted these meetings...yikes.
Apr 24 13 12:02 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Camabs
Posts: 323
Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands


Robb Mann wrote:
Its hard enough to find time to shoot. Why meet for coffee or tea when you could just be shooting instead?

this

Apr 24 13 12:34 am  Link  Quote 
Model
IDiivil
Posts: 4,019
Los Angeles, California, US


I will agree to castings. I generally will not agree to meeting up. I have in the past, but it is VERY rare and dependent entirely on circumstances.
Apr 24 13 01:04 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Legeros Photography LLC
Posts: 223
Sterling, Virginia, US


David Kirk wrote:
I don't typically suggest meeting with a model to discuss a shoot, but have had models suggest/require it.  I actually enjoy meeting up to discuss a shoot and find that face to face discussion is better than by email/phone, but I rarely have time to do it.  The vast majority of my shoots are done without any pre-shoot meetings or even phone calls - typically just a few MM messages and emails.

Notwithstanding the time element required, I personally think it's a good idea for a few reasons.
1. Face to face discussion relative to EACH PARTIES expectations may be resolved.
2. While nothing can be certain from a 20 min meeting, both should be able to come away with a pretty good idea of the legitimacy of each.
3. I ALWAYS want to make sure models I shoot are FULLY aware of what they're signing relative to my release. (which I like to email off to them before the shoot for their perusal) Often times they'll have questions that can be resolved on the spot.

I find most models are amenable to a short meet and in fact are happy to do so. Again, it does require taking some time but in most cases I believe it is well worth the effort. Also, it goes without saying that ANY pre-shoot meeting should be done in a public place....Just my opinion...

Apr 24 13 01:14 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Legeros Photography LLC
Posts: 223
Sterling, Virginia, US


ChristerArt wrote:
I got a message, asking me to post this. Remembering it from a thread years ago (and boy, did a lot of guys get their dicks in a knot in that thread), he said it fits very well in this thread as there clearly are two factions in the thread - those who shoot "straight up and down without any preparation or care little about the final image(s)" and "those who make every effort in producing their images".

He said: "Seems there are the Image TAKERS and the Image MAKERS - and this attitude fits equally well with models."



Well known Professional Photographer Frederic Neema:


This is what I recently used with an out-of-state client in a negotiation process for a corporate job where I was against local WFH (Work For Hire) shooters at $1,400/day. My fees were $12,000 for two days plus digital fees and travel expenses.


Image Takers versus Image Makers...

There are two kinds of photographers: the Image Takers and the Image makers.


The Image Takers are the photographers who record whatever happens to be in  front of their lens. If you sell ketchup, they will record the exact shape of the bottle and its red color. If you sell cars, they will show every single technical detail of the hero car. If your company is located in a high-rise building, they will record the total height with all the details in the windows. If your CEO is short, they will show it.

They will record all the details but don't ask them to make your ketchup appear appetizing, your cars look sexy, your company feel successful or your CEO look like a world leader.

They are just image recorders who probably charge by the day, half day or hour and don't care about the rest.

The Image Makers are the ones who actually sell your product or image. They go beyond the recording phase and have a gift to trigger desire, interest, love, surprise and other human emotions through the images they create.

These emotions sell!

These photographers have a talent and a vision that is unique to each of them and that is highly valuable to their clients. They would be crazy not to make money from this creative gift and talent that they have and this is exactly what they do: they charge according to the value of their images. The more valuable an image is, the more the client will want to use it. This is why they charge per usage.

If you are trying to find an Image maker at the price of an Image taker, you are probably wasting your time. The good and experienced ones know their value and charge per usage.

These Image Makers can offer you what you really need at a price that is probably very well proportioned to your total marketing and advertising budget.

In most cases, it makes more sense to hire this type of photographer to create the images that will sell your product or image. And always remember that talent sells."

I got the job,

Frederic Neema

Nice post and well stated...thank you. I'm going to assume you like the idea of a pre-shoot meeting...

Apr 24 13 01:27 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Legeros Photography LLC
Posts: 223
Sterling, Virginia, US


JOEL McDONALD wrote:
I did it twice and neither time did the shoot happen even though the pre-shoot meeting went very well.

Won't do them again. If it's a TF shoot there's little need. If it's a paid shoot with an unknown model then a test shoot works well.

Agreed. In my opinion if the shoot is TFP, then a pre meet is probably not required as the trade is "what you get is what you get". On the other hand, if payment is to be made, there is much more at stake than perhaps a GWC or an IM.

Photographers that are not considered GWCs, in other words photogs that get paid, IMO only shoot for a couple of reasons. They shoot because of clients, or because they want to shoot a certain model. Either way, taking a little time out of the day for verification is warranted if the shoot is not TFP. One more thing...just because some photographers get paid...doesn't mean they're not a GWC....lol

Apr 24 13 01:36 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
ChristerArt
Posts: 2,861
Cambridge, England, United Kingdom


George Legeros wrote:

Nice post and well stated...thank you. I'm going to assume you like the idea of a pre-shoot meeting...

Indeed.

As far as I am concerned, a TFP takes exactly as much time and effort as a "paid" shoot and to me, the mind and attitude of whoever I am supposed to work with is the important part - hence a Look See.

Apr 24 13 02:09 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
ChristerArt
Posts: 2,861
Cambridge, England, United Kingdom


George Legeros wrote:

Agreed. In my opinion if the shoot is TFP, then a pre meet is probably not required as the trade is "what you get is what you get". On the other hand, if payment is to be made, there is much more at stake than perhaps a GWC or an IM.

Photographers that are not considered GWCs, in other words photogs that get paid, IMO only shoot for a couple of reasons. They shoot because of clients, or because they want to shoot a certain model. Either way, taking a little time out of the day for verification is warranted if the shoot is not TFP. One more thing...just because some photographers get paid...doesn't mean they're not a GWC....lol

You missed "Because they got images in their minds they want - need - to get done."..=*^)

Apr 24 13 02:39 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Tony Lawrence
Posts: 19,068
Chicago, Illinois, US


Recently I did a shoot that I wouldn't have agreed too do had I met the model before hand.   I saw her images on-line and assumed she looked like them.   Her look had changed and the photos had been well edited.   Skills I lack.   The shoot was a waste of time.   She did her best and maybe if I were a better shooter I could have produced some solid work.   She looked years older then her images.   Pre-shoot meetings are critical for any kind of serious work in my view that involves a make-up artist and payment.   Its also nice too get a feel for people's personality but its important too see exactly what a models strengths and weakness are.   Does she have bad teeth.    How is her hair and skin.   Has she put on extra weight.   Are her photos current.   Have they been Photoshopped.   

If the model is providing her own clothing.   What kinds of things does she have.   Do they flatter her.   Working pros and those wanting to be pros must NOT leave things too chance.   Once you start clicking you have to provide images.
Apr 24 13 06:04 am  Link  Quote 
Model
Aymee Chantelle
Posts: 13
Tampa, Florida, US


That's happened to me twice and both times the guys were creeps.  One met up late at night and wanted me to try on swimsuits in the parking lot across the street.  When I told him I wasn't comfortable he insisted I send him pics from home on my phone. 

The second was a body paint photographer who after saying ruched underwear and pasties were okay kept trying to pressure me for completely nude.  I didn't do a shoot with either of them.
Apr 24 13 07:35 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
San Francisco Nudes
Posts: 2,910
San Leandro, California, US


I have mixed feelings about this.  I used to do pre-shoot meetings with somewhat marginal models - where they didn't have a lot of work in their portfolio that seemed relatively untouched, or if they seemed a bit flaky, or just generally if I wasn't quite ready to commit to them for whatever reason.  They were brief - show up on time, look like you're supposed to, seem reasonably pleasant, get the job.

I had some models flake, so probably good they were filtered.  I had some models who seemed OK but weren't in person.  One was crazy shy and had trouble making eye contact.  The other had some post surgery scars that were touched up in her images and there were no mentions in their profile.  If these people were more established a reference check would have caught these hopefully.  I had some models who were fine and we proceeded to do the shoot.

These days I have less time and don't shoot as often so there's less incentive to give marginal models a chance.  I can imagine doing it if the model's changed her look recently and doesn't have recent shots available but since everybody has a smart phone now is there really any excuse for not being able to send over a picture?
Apr 24 13 12:29 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Herman Surkis
Posts: 8,550
Victoria, British Columbia, Canada


allison mindy wrote:
I think most experienced models and photographers would agree with you. It's a waste of everyone's time.

So all the agency's doing 'go see's' and castings are wasting everyone's time.
So nice to know.

If I do not know you, then without meeting first, I am not going to spend time setting up equipment, and blocking out time to suddenly discover "who the hell is this that suddenly showed up at my door', or worse, that I am picking up.

Apr 24 13 01:03 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Oliver Mag
Posts: 3
Amsterdam, Noord-Holland, Netherlands


(didnt read all the posts, just replying @title)

The "meeting for tea" could actually help the shoot, as the photographer sees your features, the way you act/talk/are so he can eventually even help you during the shoot if he notices right away that you are shy etc he/she will coach you through a little more ( if its a patient one )

And a lot of photographers even do go sees , its just like castings for a job, you meet with the photographer for the shoot. Polas often are too old / do not show your current look as hair etc changes constantly

So your "meeting for a cup of tea" is a rather necessarry and smart thing to do for a photographer in my opinion
Apr 24 13 01:18 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Wynd Mulysa
Posts: 8,597
Berkeley, California, US


Herman Surkis wrote:

So all the agency's doing 'go see's' and castings are wasting everyone's time.
So nice to know.

If I do not know you, then without meeting first, I am not going to spend time setting up equipment, and blocking out time to suddenly discover "who the hell is this that suddenly showed up at my door', or worse, that I am picking up.

Well, this is a question you could ask her references, though, isn't it?  "Did the model show up to the shoot looking like she does in her portfolio?  Did you recognize her?  Do you think her photos are outdated or exceptionally retouched?"

Apr 24 13 01:19 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Sal W Hanna
Posts: 6,623
Huntington Beach, California, US


Occasionally I'll suggest a pre-shoot meet if:
1. The shoot is complex and requires a lot of team planning
2. The model is a newbie with no reputation. If I elect to book the model I want a reassurance they will show up. If they can't show up to an interview, they won't show up to the shoot.
I've met on multiple occasions with MUA's, Hair Stylists, Photo Assistants and Studios in advance, so why would it be any different for a model?
Apr 24 13 01:26 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
picturephoto
Posts: 8,687
Toronto, Ontario, Canada


Wynd Mulysa wrote:
For what it's worth, I do.  My schedule is pretty crazy and I try hard to schedule every shoot I can.  Taking 30 minutes out of my day to meet with a new photographer to have tea somewhere kind of seems pointless and like I could be doing something more efficient with my time.  What could be said over tea that couldn't be said over email or the phone?  I understand that the photographer may want to make sure I actually look like I do in my portfolio, or get a feel of my personality...  But could he just check my references and talk to me on the phone?

A long time ago, photographers would meet up with me with a printed portfolio.  That was the day.  But now, with so many photos online, I don't need to see a printed portfolio to know if I want to work with someone.  I have already agreed to work with them by that point, anyway.

So..  Who likes meeting in person pre-shoot and why?  Do you think it's actually necessary?

Unless it's a job that was booked by a third-party client, I don't see a need for a pre-shoot meeting either.  For jobs there are production meetings and go-sees that can't be avoided, but when I'm shooting for fun, emails with concepts images, and digitals of the model are enough.  I don't see a need for a phone call either, but that's just me.

Considering that any creatives I shoot are only with agency talent or the very occasional traveling model, that makes the process pretty simple.

Apr 24 13 01:27 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
John Jebbia
Posts: 27,612
Phoenix, Arizona, US


Bottom line is if you're not willing to do what's required or requested, then you're going to lose those jobs. If you can afford to do that, then by all means. Skip 'em.
Apr 24 13 01:28 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Oliver Mag
Posts: 3
Amsterdam, Noord-Holland, Netherlands


Well one person could think bad of the model persona, another one could love her/him so I think in this case its a advantage if the photographer wants to meet in person as theres so much gossiping in this business i would not trust the references

And i think this even makes a good photographer better, i really enjoy go sees or at least a quick phonecall before the shoot , just shows me that he knows what he´s looking for in a model. -> Personality influences the photograph in my opinion a lot
Apr 24 13 01:30 pm  Link  Quote 
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