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Photographer
Trisha Bowyer
Posts: 1,311
Martinsburg, West Virginia, US


Sorry if this has been covered. I can't find anything on this forum or any other about this particular subject.

So, I recently got hired at a senior portrait place. During training they told us they wanted us to physically pose every subject. Like squat in front of them and manhandle their heads and what not. I usually just tell them while doing the pose myself and that has worked for me for years and I only touch a client if I need to adjust hair, jewelry or clothing. My question is: is that normal? They do nice work and its obviously working for them, I just don't feel comfortable with it and wanted to ask other portrait photographers to weigh in.  I'm not at all shy or sheepish I just try and respect personal space but perhaps I've been doing it all wrong? I know there's lots of ways to get similar results and I'll have to do it the way they want it done as they are the boss. I guess I just want to hear that other people do this so I don't feel too weird about it.

Thoughts?
Apr 23 13 08:12 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Caveman Creations
Posts: 580
Fort Worth, Texas, US


Touch a High School Senior? Hell no, you have no idea where they've been! But all jokes aside, no I don't touch subjects unless they are really that dense, that they just don't understand what I'm asking of them. I can generally get what I want out of them by direction only.

But......

You were hired by a Senior Portrait place. They are the one's paying, so you will be the one listening, and doing what they ask. How we shoot our portraits is of no real consequence, because we didn't hire you. If this type of interaction with your subjects makes you uncomfortable (for whatever reason), you may be able to communicate that with them, but if they want you to physically put people where they want them to be, you will either have to do it, or open your own Senior Portrait place..... because you'll be out of a job! More than likely, this place will be more about the numbers of people photographed, and not the photo itself, or how you got the photo. It's the golden rule, "He who has the gold, gets to make the rules." In this case, the gold is your paycheck....
Apr 23 13 08:30 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Marin Photography NYC
Posts: 6,623
New York, New York, US


For myself, I keep my hands to myself - I don't ever physically pose anyone. It's a matter of personal space and I don't think this place gives a shit about offending clients.

If you are paid to do it well you gotta do it I guess or you can move on. If you go through with it, communicate what you are going to do before putting your hands on anyone....

I use hand gestures or use myself as an example even if I look silly, usually good for a laugh.
Apr 23 13 08:36 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Trisha Bowyer
Posts: 1,311
Martinsburg, West Virginia, US


Caveman Creations wrote:
Touch a High School Senior? Hell no, you have no idea where they've been! But all jokes aside, no I don't touch subjects unless they are really that dense, that they just don't understand what I'm asking of them. I can generally get what I want out of them by direction only.

But......

You were hired by a Senior Portrait place. They are the one's paying, so you will be the one listening, and doing what they ask. How we shoot our portraits is of no real consequence, because we didn't hire you. If this type of interaction with your subjects makes you uncomfortable (for whatever reason), you may be able to communicate that with them, but if they want you to physically put people where they want them to be, you will either have to do it, or open your own Senior Portrait place..... because you'll be out of a job! More than likely, this place will be more about the numbers of people photographed, and not the photo itself, or how you got the photo. It's the golden rule, "He who has the gold, gets to make the rules." In this case, the gold is your paycheck....

Actually it's a really small family owned studio that is very much about the photo itself (and the experience you make for them). But I have worked for big companies that just needed you to shoot volume. And yes, I know I'll have to suck it up and do what they want...I just wanted to hear that that's the norm or isn't.  I guess you pretty much have the same philosophy as I do when it comes to posing.

Apr 23 13 08:39 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Trisha Bowyer
Posts: 1,311
Martinsburg, West Virginia, US


Marin Photography wrote:
For myself, I keep my hands to myself - I don't ever physically pose anyone. It's a matter of personal space and I don't think this place gives a shit about offending clients.

If you are paid to do it well you gotta do it I guess or you can move on. If you go through with it, communicate what you are going to do before putting your hands on anyone....

I use hand gestures or use myself as an example even if I look silly, usually good for a laugh.

I honestly don't think they ever even considered it offensive. The parents founded it and trained their kids the way they did it and everyone else (all women) who were hired were trained the same way. I don't think anyone even questioned it. I'm just a bit more new school than they are used to maybe?

Apr 23 13 08:46 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Marin Photography NYC
Posts: 6,623
New York, New York, US


Well where I am from, you don't put your hands on someone's face is why I say that. For a woman you can get away with it probably. As a male, not so much.

You can pat a male on the back and it not be perceived as anything but some woman wouldn't appreciate it. So, as a measure of caution, I don't touch anyone if I don't have to.

I think it all depends on your approach more than anything and communicating your intentions. Not just walking up to someone and moving them around and tweaking their chin movements and so forth...haha
Apr 23 13 08:50 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Caveman Creations
Posts: 580
Fort Worth, Texas, US


You never said it was a Mom and Pop shop! wink The OP made it sound like you were working for Lifetouch, or something like that. Anyway....

I would venture to say that it is not the norm to touch, handle, or physically pose. But then again, everyone has their own style. There is also the gender thing, as you said, everyone there has been female. Socially, it is more ok for females to touch another person than a male. That may have a lot to do with it as well. I'm a "glass half empty" kinda guy, and can't help but to think of the one time that one particular individual will be offended by this and sue me, so I do my best to stay behind the camera. That's my main mode of thought on something like this, but like I said, I'd talk to them, and see what they have to say about it. Either way, make sure you learn everything you can, good or bad, and that will help you down the road no matter the outcome. borat
Apr 23 13 08:56 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Marin Photography NYC
Posts: 6,623
New York, New York, US


Caveman Creations wrote:
You never said it was a Mom and Pop shop! wink The OP made it sound like you were working for Lifetouch, or something like that. Anyway....

I would venture to say that it is not the norm to touch, handle, or physically pose. But then again, everyone has their own style. There is also the gender thing, as you said, everyone there has been female. Socially, it is more ok for females to touch another person than a male. That may have a lot to do with it as well. I'm a "glass half empty" kinda guy, and can't help but to think of the one time that one particular individual will be offended by this and sue me, so I do my best to stay behind the camera. That's my main mode of thought on something like this, but like I said, I'd talk to them, and see what they have to say about it. Either way, make sure you learn everything you can, good or bad, and that will help you down the road no matter the outcome. borat

He explains it better...

Apr 23 13 08:59 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Will Snizek Photography
Posts: 1,387
Beckley, West Virginia, US


Verbal instructions are fine.  There's no need to touch a subject.  Just depends on how much you want the job I guess.
Apr 23 13 09:00 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Preime Photography
Posts: 50
Brighton, England, United Kingdom


There is nothing wrong with physically correcting a pose if it is done appropriately and always, always preceded with the question "may I touch you to adjust your pose". Verbal direction will only ever get you so far and whilst mimicking the required action helps a lot sometimes you have to fine-tune turn their head or shoulder position.
Apr 23 13 09:03 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
ontherocks
Posts: 22,180
Salem, Oregon, US


i'm male and try to avoid touching the females. if something needs to be adjusted i'll let the wife handle it or ask for permission to do it myself or try to coach the customer through it.

sometimes i'll demonstrate the pose by doing it myself.

sometimes it would be helpful to get hands on and pose the client like they were a doll. but being male i tend to avoid that, at least with the female customers. but maybe female photographers can get away with it.
Apr 23 13 09:06 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Mark Salo
Posts: 8,015
Olney, Maryland, US


Aside from the comfort level of you and your subject, this is a fast way to do cookie-cutter portraits.  Success will depend on your ability to pose your subject quickly and finish the session.

Big name photographers who use this method often use constant lights and place the camera on a tripod.  They pose the subject, step aside, and trigger the camera remotely.  Then they step in for the next pose.

Wedding photographer, xxxx, hires assistants and associates based on their ability to photograph 70 standardized, pre-planed poses in 20 minutes or less.
Apr 23 13 09:08 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
TheScarletLetterSeries
Posts: 3,438
Carmel, California, US


Your job (imo) as a portrait photographer is to make people look good in print, and posing is a large part of the equation. Not all subjects are as comfortable or fluid in front of the camera.  Sometimes on occasion verbal instructions and "mirroring" don't work.    If posing help is needed, try gently using just your pinky fingers to start, and describe/explain as you pose.

There is a huge difference in inappropriate touching/manhandling and helping a subject to pose.
Apr 23 13 09:09 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
ontherocks
Posts: 22,180
Salem, Oregon, US


i've seen plenty of posts from models who would seem to feel otherwise. and that has made me shy away from any touching. then again going for your senior portraits in the mall isn't the same as being a model, especially a nude one.

TheScarletLetterSeries wrote:
There is a huge difference in inappropriate touching/manhandling and helping a subject to pose.

Apr 23 13 09:12 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
MCPHOTO
Posts: 728
Duvall, Washington, US


Have I yes although its usually with younger kids. Do I like to no. With seniors especially girls you can get in trouble real quick.What I do if they don't get the pose is show them by doing it myself. Although I have found it's the guys that need more help then the girls.
Apr 23 13 09:13 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Trisha Bowyer
Posts: 1,311
Martinsburg, West Virginia, US


allrighty then. I guess the general consensus is some people do this...others, not so much. I just never had MY senior portraits taken so I had nothing to base it off of but my past experience shooting them.
Apr 23 13 09:23 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Trisha May Photography
Posts: 302
Colchester, Connecticut, US


I usually don't but if their hair is out of place or something I -ask- if its okay if I can fix it. As for posing no. I don't. I usually just show the model what I want by doing the pose myself (and it also makes for a good laugh at my expense haha).
Apr 23 13 09:25 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Smedley Whiplash
Posts: 17,242
Billings, Montana, US


Trisha Bowyer wrote:

Actually it's a really small family owned studio that is very much about the photo itself (and the experience you make for them). But I have worked for big companies that just needed you to shoot volume. And yes, I know I'll have to suck it up and do what they want...I just wanted to hear that that's the norm or isn't.  I guess you pretty much have the same philosophy as I do when it comes to posing.

Lots of these studios churn out poses that sell. It's not really personal to the subject, it's a look/pose that is an easy seller. Making it personal just reduces sales. The point is to 'feed the machine' created by the studio (staff, building, etc).

The point of you posing the client is to expedite that process. (time is money)

Apr 23 13 09:27 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
New Art Photo
Posts: 701
Los Angeles, California, US


Try to avoid touching the models. You can verbally have them adjust their postures.
You're are a women. Imagine if they asked a young male photographer to physically touch every senior they photograph....  Ignore your bosses.
Apr 23 13 09:33 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Trisha Bowyer
Posts: 1,311
Martinsburg, West Virginia, US


Trisha F Photography wrote:
I usually don't but if their hair is out of place or something I -ask- if its okay if I can fix it. As for posing no. I don't. I usually just show the model what I want by doing the pose myself (and it also makes for a good laugh at my expense haha).

That's how I'm used to working. I guess we'll see how natural I can be at a different approach.

Apr 23 13 09:43 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
New Art Photo
Posts: 701
Los Angeles, California, US


That's how I'm used to working. I guess we'll see how natural I can be at a different approach.

________________________________________________

You seem like a smart, ambitious young women.
One of the greatest Life lessons you can learn, is to walk away when the  job/situation/person doesn't feel right.

Maybe this dumb requirement is the Universe's clue that this isn't the job for you, and you need to keep looking.

Apr 23 13 09:53 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Dan Brady
Posts: 605
Perth, Western Australia, Australia


Trisha Bowyer wrote:
Sorry if this has been covered. I can't find anything on this forum or any other about this particular subject.

So, I recently got hired at a senior portrait place. During training they told us they wanted us to physically pose every subject. Like squat in front of them and manhandle their heads and what not. I usually just tell them while doing the pose myself and that has worked for me for years and I only touch a client if I need to adjust hair, jewelry or clothing. My question is: is that normal? They do nice work and its obviously working for them, I just don't feel comfortable with it and wanted to ask other portrait photographers to weigh in.  I'm not at all shy or sheepish I just try and respect personal space but perhaps I've been doing it all wrong? I know there's lots of ways to get similar results and I'll have to do it the way they want it done as they are the boss. I guess I just want to hear that other people do this so I don't feel too weird about it.

Thoughts?

I've never man handled a model in my life. I'll show them the pose - act it out like a twat.

But touching them. fine line my friend

best to keep on the right side.

Apr 23 13 09:59 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Trisha Bowyer
Posts: 1,311
Martinsburg, West Virginia, US


New Art Photo wrote:
That's how I'm used to working. I guess we'll see how natural I can be at a different approach.

________________________________________________

You seem like a smart, ambitious young women.
One of the greatest Life lessons you can learn, is to walk away when the  job/situation/person doesn't feel right.

Maybe this dumb requirement is the Universe's clue that this isn't the job for you, and you need to keep looking.

Thanks...I think? Anyhow, I haven't actually started shooting yet. I'm just training right now. I like to give things a chance before I give up. Sometimes getting out of your comfort zone is freeing, and sometimes it's hell. I don't know which way it's going to go yet.

And as far as looking for a job goes....it's painful. There aren't many available where I am and the ones that are I refuse to entertain (Shooting in a k-mart? I just can't make myself do it). This particular place is nice, produce nice work and the people seem pretty cool. I think I might actually learn how to successfully run a business among other things. If I don't learn anything, the environment isn't what I was looking for or something unsavory happens then I will figure out plan B. I'd still probably work out the season anyway. It's just my nature to finish what I start, even if it's just one season.

Apr 23 13 10:02 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
J Cross Photography
Posts: 17
Detroit, Michigan, US


I don't see the purpose in having to physically touch the subjects. They should be able to position themselves correctly from verbal direction. Anytime that I do need to make an adjustment I always say "pardon my reach" before doing so. It's important for the subject to feel comfortable and to trust their photographer. I just don't see the point in the touching. If your bosses are not around, do what works for you.
Apr 23 13 10:10 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Cherrystone
Posts: 35,982
Columbus, Ohio, US


You're comparing apples to oranges here.....shooting at a mom & pop portrait studio, then asking for opinions in the hallowed halls of MM.

Do you want the job? Do as your bosses ask. I'd seriously doubt if more than one client there, if that, ever complained.
Apr 23 13 10:11 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Will Snizek Photography
Posts: 1,387
Beckley, West Virginia, US


West Virginia is a tough place to find a high paying job unless you want to go into the coal mines.  I've definitely noticed that during the 5 1/2 years I've been here.  I'm fortunate to have a pension and I moved here with out of state money already in my pocket.  WV is a pretty cheap place to live fortunately.  I don't think I'd be happy with myself shooting at K-Mart either.
Apr 23 13 10:13 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Carle Photography
Posts: 9,227
Oakland, California, US


TheScarletLetterSeries wrote:
There is a huge difference in inappropriate touching/manhandling and helping a subject to pose.
ontherocks wrote:
i've seen plenty of posts from models who would seem to feel otherwise. and that has made me shy away from any touching. then again going for your senior portraits in the mall isn't the same as being a model, especially a nude one.

Posts on MM from models has nothing to do with a thread that is dedicated to professional portrait photographers. Even in glamour and boudoir work, clients know the difference in a gentle touch to help a client to pose and manhandling as TSL stated.

I have been taught by many long time professional portrait and commission photographers that a pinki as mentioned or using the back of your hand is also acceptable.

Apr 23 13 10:13 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Downtown Pro Photo
Posts: 1,543
Crystal Lake, Illinois, US


I prefer to show the pose to them myself, it has the added advantage of getting the model to relax a bit when they see me being goofy with poses.  I throw in some jokes about how funny I look posing, which is why I'm on the other side of the camera and they get a good laugh.
I only touch after asking permission each time and it's usually more for fixing hair or pulling some wrinkles out of clothing.  Show respect for their space and they usually don't mind and will respect your opinion more.
Apr 23 13 10:26 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Trisha Bowyer
Posts: 1,311
Martinsburg, West Virginia, US


Cherrystone wrote:
You're comparing apples to oranges here.....shooting at a mom & pop portrait studio, then asking for opinions in the hallowed halls of MM.

Do you want the job? Do as your bosses ask. I'd seriously doubt if more than one client there, if that, ever complained.

I doubt it as well. Most likely zero complaints. Like I said, it's obviously working for them.

And yeah, I know senior portraits questions on a model site might seem a bit misplaced but I know a lot of the photographers on here pay their bills with everything from portrait work to weddings and I thought it couldn't hurt too much to ask. I've read enough of the 'don't touch the models or else' threads on here which is why I tried to emphasis that this was a horse of a different color entirely.

Apr 23 13 10:57 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Carle Photography
Posts: 9,227
Oakland, California, US


Trisha Bowyer wrote:
I doubt it as well. Most likely zero complaints. Like I said, it's obviously working for them.

And yeah, I know senior portraits questions on a model site might seem a bit misplaced but I know a lot of the photographers on here pay their bills with everything from portrait work to weddings and I thought it couldn't hurt too much to ask. I've read enough of the 'don't touch the models or else' threads on here which is why I tried to emphasis that this was a horse of a different color entirely.

There are a few of us who run full studios and do boudoir/portrait and such.

smile

Apr 23 13 11:04 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
TrianglePhoto
Posts: 569
Chicago, Illinois, US


30 years ago, when I worked shooting portraits, that is how I was taught.. gently guide the subject to the correct pose, moving chin, hands, shoulders, etc...

It is a technique I abandoned years ago, although, on that very rare occasion when I'm working with a subject that has difficulty finding the angle I'm directing them too, I'll fall back to it an gently make the final adjustments.

However, then as now, I always asked before touching anybody.
Apr 23 13 11:04 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Trisha Bowyer
Posts: 1,311
Martinsburg, West Virginia, US


TrianglePhoto wrote:
30 years ago, when I worked shooting portraits, that is how I was taught.. gently guide the subject to the correct pose, moving chin, hands, shoulders, etc...

It is a technique I abandoned years ago, although, on that very rare occasion when I'm working with a subject that has difficulty finding the angle I'm directing them too, I'll fall back to it an gently make the final adjustments.

However, then as now, I always asked before touching anybody.

So, it's just an old school technique. That's kind of what I thought. I guess I just wondered if I was right and if people were still doing it.

Thanks everyone for your insights and opinions. smile

Apr 23 13 11:13 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
New Art Photo
Posts: 701
Los Angeles, California, US


[
And as far as looking for a job goes....it's painful. There aren't many available where I am and the ones that are I refuse to entertain (Shooting in a k-mart? I just can't make myself do it). This particular place is nice, produce nice work and the people seem pretty cool. I think I might actually learn how to successfully run a business among other things. If I don't learn anything, the environment isn't what I was looking for or something unsavory happens then I will figure out plan B. I'd still probably work out the season anyway. It's just my nature to finish what I start, even if it's just one season. [/quote__________________________________________________________
The first thing you have to understand, is that there is essentially no money in "Art". ( of any kind) ....sad
  If you want to make money as a photographer, Weddings seems to be the place to be. --There are about 30 people who make money working for major magazines, and about 30 major fashion photographers. You just have to find your passion and then find a way to earn a living. If you're lucky, your passion will eventually provide a living. But "it's a long way to the top if you want to rock and roll." (I'm learning that every year.) Personally, If I were young, I would do photography at KMart
in a heartbeat. What a experience that would be!-- even if you only did it for six months. Talk about Avant Garde.
Apr 23 13 11:17 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Trisha Bowyer
Posts: 1,311
Martinsburg, West Virginia, US


New Art Photo wrote:
[
Personally, If I were young, I would do photography at KMart
in a heartbeat. What a experience that would be!-- even if you only did it for six months. Talk about Avant Garde.

LOL. Indeed...if one could last 6 months there.

Apr 23 13 11:25 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Cherrystone
Posts: 35,982
Columbus, Ohio, US


Trisha Bowyer wrote:

I doubt it as well. Most likely zero complaints. Like I said, it's obviously working for them.

And yeah, I know senior portraits questions on a model site might seem a bit misplaced but I know a lot of the photographers on here pay their bills with everything from portrait work to weddings and I thought it couldn't hurt too much to ask. I've read enough of the 'don't touch the models or else' threads on here which is why I tried to emphasis that this was a horse of a different color entirely.

It is a different color horse, but most of your answers on here will look like the same old nag. wink

Apr 23 13 11:26 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
MC Photo
Posts: 4,144
New York, New York, US


Trisha Bowyer wrote:
Sorry if this has been covered. I can't find anything on this forum or any other about this particular subject.

So, I recently got hired at a senior portrait place. During training they told us they wanted us to physically pose every subject. Like squat in front of them and manhandle their heads and what not. I usually just tell them while doing the pose myself and that has worked for me for years and I only touch a client if I need to adjust hair, jewelry or clothing. My question is: is that normal? They do nice work and its obviously working for them, I just don't feel comfortable with it and wanted to ask other portrait photographers to weigh in.  I'm not at all shy or sheepish I just try and respect personal space but perhaps I've been doing it all wrong? I know there's lots of ways to get similar results and I'll have to do it the way they want it done as they are the boss. I guess I just want to hear that other people do this so I don't feel too weird about it.

Thoughts?

I the early 90's sexual harrassment and sensitivity in the workplace were a hot topic.

I did a lot of corporate training in an unrelated subject and there was a woman I taught with who when it came to a certain part would specifically pair men and women together for an exercise that required straddling each other. Everyone else kept it same gender to avoid making people uncomfortable.

The interesting thing was that there was something about this woman that made people fell totally comfortable and there were never any complaints and what she did (people complained about all sorts of tiny little things).

Some people have a way about them and it just works. Some people interact with the world through their ears, some with their eyes and some through touch. Your employer is probably one of the last ones and they probably find it important for themselves to have physical contact as it's part of how they bond with the subject.

If you were to do it while feeling uncomfortable, that would probably show and pass along the discomfort. I think that you should not touch them unless you a very comfortable doing it. As long as the photos come out good, it's not going to matter.

If you're considering it, I think you should watch your employer very carefully to see how they do it. If they are turning the person's chin, I'd watch everything else they do and ignore that. They may be changing their posture in a communicative way. They may be touching the subject's shoulder with their other hand - shoulder touches are often reassuring or sympathetic gestures. They may be unconsciously doing things that make the subject comfortable with being touched.

There are all sorts of appropriate physical contact with strangers - medical examinations, currying off and removing clothing in emergencies, massage, sports lessons. Touch is not by definition inappropriate. It may not be common in photography as a whole,  but that doesn't make it inappropriate if it's done right.

The biggest mistake you could make is doing something you're not comfortable with.

Apr 23 13 12:08 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
AJScalzitti
Posts: 12,209
Atlanta, Georgia, US


That does sound like something LifeTouch would say - given the work they turn out I think its safe to say this (and most) training from them will only teach you the wrong way to do things.
Apr 23 13 12:18 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Guss W
Posts: 10,573
Clearwater, Florida, US


Most senior operations are set up for efficiency, and guiding them into the basic poses with a little physical help speeds things up.  Each situation needs to be sized up for risks, though.  Being a female may have been a factor in your being chosen.  If this is an established family studio, they may have been shooting these kids since they were babies, and trust may already be established.

Personally, I only do it at weddings where people are a little dazed and tend to confuse their left and right.  There are witnesses all around, so I'm not going to get accused of anything.
Apr 23 13 06:42 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
AJScalzitti
Posts: 12,209
Atlanta, Georgia, US


Guss W wrote:
Most senior operations are set up for efficiency, and guiding them into the basic poses with a little physical help speeds things up.  Each situation needs to be sized up for risks, though.  Being a female may have been a factor in your being chosen.  If this is an established family studio, they may have been shooting these kids since they were babies, and trust may already be established.

Personally, I only do it at weddings where people are a little dazed and tend to confuse their left and right.  There are witnesses all around, so I'm not going to get accused of anything.

Just the risk of being accused of shooting weddings tongue

Apr 23 13 06:59 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
RKD Photographic
Posts: 3,263
Iserlohn, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany


People never do as they're told, so I use one of these: invaluable studio accessory IMO...

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/5b/Photographer-studio-1893.jpg/800px-Photographer-studio-1893.jpg
Apr 24 13 12:34 am  Link  Quote 
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