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Clothing Designer
Amanda_Brown
Posts: 12
London, England, United Kingdom


Hey,

I've been styling for nearly a year now and I normally buy clothes from retailers or pull from upcoming designers.

I would really appreciate any information on how PR companies operate and how you are able to pull pieces from them??

Thanks smile
Apr 24 13 01:05 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Thomas Van Dyke
Posts: 1,518
Washington, District of Columbia, US


Amanda_Brown wrote:
Pulling clothes from PR companies ...I normally buy clothes from retailers or pull from upcoming designers...

tried and true route, thank you for not simply purchasing with the intent to immediately return said items, I'm constantly amazed at wardrobe stylist who somehow think this is SOP... having to wait endlessly while a stylist tapes the bottom of footwear so it can be returned is ludicrous on a set where time is money... enough said... 

Amanda_Brown wrote:
...how PR companies operate and how you are able to pull pieces from them?

First PR companies do not actually have the garments instead they generally have multiple clothing industry clients, thus it is up to you to convince them that you are collaborating on a project that may result in getting one of their client's brands in front of prospects... i.e. buyers...

What is necessary is a "Pull Letter" which is provided by a publication's editor stating it is commissioning an editorial shoot... it MUST be signed by the magazine's editor... Once you have a Pull Letter in hand you may approach both PR agencies and boutiques in your market in an effort to meet the requirements of the visual statement, concept or theme assigned by the magazine's editor...

Please keep in mind you will have to provide collateral to assure recompense should anything happen to the "pulled" items... this is generally your CCard (or that of the AD/Photographer on the collaboration.)  Additionally all garments must be professionally cleaned (at your expense) prior to being returned...

Other situations involve product placement for Celebrity Stylist... in this case a stylist has to pull multiple accessories, shoes, purses and jewelry for all wardrobe options... typically collections from a particular brand...   

Note there is a vast difference between runway as opposed to pret a porter (ready-to-wear.)  Avant garde, Haute Couture, one-of-kind, runway garments most likely will never sell, but will be loaned to stylist if the project is to appear in a fashion magazine and/or be worn by celebs because it is unique and interesting. Savvy fashion designers take their over-the-top runway collections and create toned-down pret a porter versions of the garments for the average retail consumer...

But then again since YOU are a fashion designer (from your profile) you may be keenly aware of this...

How do I get ensembles for use in fashion campaigns? I collaborate directly with designers in my marketplace... most oft they are on set and approve a series of captures before I move on to the next... gaining agreement and acceptance i.e. closure for each ensemble's image in real-time during the session is paramount to meeting expectations here... experience is a brutal teacher...

Hope this helps...

all the best on your journey...

Apr 24 13 06:18 am  Link  Quote 
Clothing Designer
Amanda_Brown
Posts: 12
London, England, United Kingdom


Thomas Van Dyke wrote:

Amanda_Brown wrote:
Pulling clothes from PR companies ...I normally buy clothes from retailers or pull from upcoming designers...

tried and true route, thank you for not simply purchasing with the intent to immediately return said items, I'm constantly amazed at wardrobe stylist who somehow think this is SOP... having to wait endlessly while a stylist tapes the bottom of footwear so it can be returned is ludicrous on a set where time is money... enough said... 

First PR companies do not actually have the garments instead they generally have multiple clothing industry clients, thus it is up to you to convince them that you are collaborating on a project that may result in getting one of their client's brands in front of prospects... i.e. buyers...

What is necessary is a "Pull Letter" which is provided by a publication's editor stating it is commissioning an editorial shoot... it MUST be signed by the magazine's editor... Once you have a Pull Letter in hand you may approach both PR agencies and boutiques in your market in an effort to meet the requirements of the visual statement, concept or theme assigned by the magazine's editor...

Please keep in mind you will have to provide collateral to assure recompense should anything happen to the "pulled" items... this is generally your CCard (or that of the AD/Photographer on the collaboration.)  Additionally all garments must be professionally cleaned (at your expense) prior to being returned...

Other situations involve product placement for Celebrity Stylist... in this case a stylist has to pull multiple accessories, shoes, purses and jewelry for all wardrobe options... typically collections from a particular brand...   

Note there is a vast difference between runway as opposed to pret a porter (ready-to-wear.)  Avant garde, Haute Couture, one-of-kind, runway garments most likely will never sell, but will be loaned to stylist if the project is to appear in a fashion magazine and/or be worn by celebs because it is unique and interesting. Savvy fashion designers take their over-the-top runway collections and create toned-down pret a porter versions of the garments for the average retail consumer...

But then again since YOU are a fashion designer (from your profile) you may be keenly aware of this...

How do I get ensembles for use in fashion campaigns? I collaborate directly with designers in my marketplace... most oft they are on set and approve a series of captures before I move on to the next... gaining agreement and acceptance i.e. closure for each ensemble's image in real-time during the session is paramount to meeting expectations here... experience is a brutal teacher...

Hope this helps...

all the best on your journey...

Thank you thank you!!! Very much, really informative I have a better understanding of how it all works now.

And yes as I designer Ive learnt to understand the importance of being commercial and more boisterous for the sake of editorials etc....Really appreciate your response smile

Apr 24 13 08:55 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
1nyc_tssm
Posts: 49
Paris, Île-de-France, France


you want to find the pr companies that have showrooms, since those pr firms actually do have the garments from multiple brands and it's easier to just deal with them. some have high fashion brands, some have smaller brands.

there're many firms in the mid-market who will send you boxes of clothes (that you have to return, sometimes even w/o collateral, though often they do want your cc) for shoots, sometimes also without pull letter. but it's unlikely they do that for just a test without even a chance it'll be submitted for publication.
try to target legit, professional pr firms that represent smaller indie or new designers. often you find out who they are by looking for the press-contact on the designer's website. google the pr people, find out who else they represent, write a nice email in which you praise their designers. contact made.

american apparel will let you purchase and return (at least in the u.s.) when you submit there for a stylist account btw. it's fairly easy, and they usually also accept if it's only for tests with models from the better agencies.

always ask if stores charge you a (re)stock/floor fee (sometimes 50%) when you have a return-agreement with them. some don't tell you this in advance (always read fineprint).

-

generally you'll be surprised what you can borrow (or get deals on) if you just ask nicely. smile

if you have more questions you can pm me if you like.
good luck:)
Apr 25 13 12:13 am  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
Lauren Reynolds Makeup
Posts: 282
London, England, United Kingdom


As you're in London, check out Blow PR, they seem to lend to quite a few of the junior stylists I've worked with and have a big showroom near Oxford Circus.
Apr 25 13 12:23 am  Link  Quote 
Clothing Designer
Amanda_Brown
Posts: 12
London, England, United Kingdom


nyc_tssm wrote:
you want to find the pr companies that have showrooms, since those pr firms actually do have the garments from multiple brands and it's easier to just deal with them. some have high fashion brands, some have smaller brands.

there're many firms in the mid-market who will send you boxes of clothes (that you have to return, sometimes even w/o collateral, though often they do want your cc) for shoots, sometimes also without pull letter. but it's unlikely they do that for just a test without even a chance it'll be submitted for publication.
try to target legit, professional pr firms that represent smaller indie or new designers. often you find out who they are by looking for the press-contact on the designer's website. google the pr people, find out who else they represent, write a nice email in which you praise their designers. contact made.

american apparel will let you purchase and return (at least in the u.s.) when you submit there for a stylist account btw. it's fairly easy, and they usually also accept if it's only for tests with models from the better agencies.

always ask if stores charge you a (re)stock/floor fee (sometimes 50%) when you have a return-agreement with them. some don't tell you this in advance (always read fineprint).

-

generally you'll be surprised what you can borrow (or get deals on) if you just ask nicely. smile

if you have more questions you can pm me if you like.
good luck:)

Thanks for your help. I checked out Aamerican Appral gonna email them and see if this applies for he UK too.....Deffo gonna just be nice and try my luck first no harm in that smile

Apr 26 13 07:43 am  Link  Quote 
Clothing Designer
Amanda_Brown
Posts: 12
London, England, United Kingdom


Lauren Reynolds MUA wrote:
As you're in London, check out Blow PR, they seem to lend to quite a few of the junior stylists I've worked with and have a big showroom near Oxford Circus.

This is exciting information! Thanks I'll check them out smile

Apr 26 13 07:44 am  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
Lauren Reynolds Makeup
Posts: 282
London, England, United Kingdom


Amanda_Brown wrote:
This is exciting information! Thanks I'll check them out smile

No problem! Also Motel Rocks are a big brand that seem to do a lot of lending, and if you haven't already, see about getting a stylist's account with ASOS. Don't know the exact policies but I know you can then purchase with a heavy discount!

Apr 26 13 11:46 am  Link  Quote 
Wardrobe Stylist
Alannah Jones Styling
Posts: 948
Long Beach, California, US


Amanda_Brown wrote:
Hey,

I've been styling for nearly a year now and I normally buy clothes from retailers or pull from upcoming designers.

I would really appreciate any information on how PR companies operate and how you are able to pull pieces from them??

Thanks smile

You can send them your pull letter (if you have one) but  this doesn't mean they are going to let you pull.It really depends on who you are styling for and if they have clothes/brands that are compatible with what you are looking for.Also try contacting them a week in advance before your shoot.

Apr 28 13 10:30 pm  Link  Quote 
Clothing Designer
Amanda_Brown
Posts: 12
London, England, United Kingdom


Lauren Reynolds MUA wrote:

No problem! Also Motel Rocks are a big brand that seem to do a lot of lending, and if you haven't already, see about getting a stylist's account with ASOS. Don't know the exact policies but I know you can then purchase with a heavy discount!

Thanks again ive been in touch with Motel works I think this a great possibility, also I enquired about the ASOS account they didn't seem to anything like that hmm Do you know anyone who has something like this for them? x

May 05 13 05:08 am  Link  Quote 
Clothing Designer
Amanda_Brown
Posts: 12
London, England, United Kingdom


Alannah J wrote:

You can send them your pull letter (if you have one) but  this doesn't mean they are going to let you pull.It really depends on who you are styling for and if they have clothes/brands that are compatible with what you are looking for.Also try contacting them a week in advance before your shoot.

Thanks very much for your advice smile

May 05 13 05:09 am  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
Lauren Reynolds Makeup
Posts: 282
London, England, United Kingdom


Amanda_Brown wrote:
Thanks again ive been in touch with Motel works I think this a great possibility, also I enquired about the ASOS account they didn't seem to anything like that hmm Do you know anyone who has something like this for them? x

Hmm I'm not sure, I just remember one stylist talking about stylists getting discounts at ASOS, maybe try get in contact with the PR department rather than consumer enquiries if that's what you did?

I think it'd be excellent if you tried assisting some stylists for a bit, you'll learn the ropes from them, specific stylists' etiquette and operations (such as pull letters and so on) and as you'd be likely doing lots of picking up/dropping off, gives you a chance to build a rapport with various PR companies. Good luck!

May 05 13 05:07 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Merry
Posts: 1,655
London, England, United Kingdom


Lauren Reynolds MUA wrote:

I think it'd be excellent if you tried assisting some stylists for a bit, you'll learn the ropes from them, specific stylists' etiquette and operations (such as pull letters and so on) and as you'd be likely doing lots of picking up/dropping off, gives you a chance to build a rapport with various PR companies. Good luck!

This is absolutely vital for you.

The experience and knowledge you will gain will be invaluable to you in the future. As you'll regularly be sent to pick up pulls (visit PRs to collect items which the stylist has already picked out and requested) you will get to know the PRs themselves, as well as the way things work, for when you're working not assisting.

If, for whatever reason, you can't do that then I echo a comment above - Blow tend to lend to everyone, particularly if you have a publication name you're submitting to.

May 06 13 02:41 am  Link  Quote 
Clothing Designer
Milly Js Shoes
Posts: 40
Stevenage, England, United Kingdom


I think it's a case of you proving your stylist worth to the potential pr company. They have endless numbers of stylists and designers whom they source from. It's perhaps a question of how well do you match their pr psychology and how adept you are at pitching your portfolio and work to them.
May 06 13 07:37 am  Link  Quote 
Clothing Designer
Amanda_Brown
Posts: 12
London, England, United Kingdom


Merry Phillips wrote:

This is absolutely vital for you.

The experience and knowledge you will gain will be invaluable to you in the future. As you'll regularly be sent to pick up pulls (visit PRs to collect items which the stylist has already picked out and requested) you will get to know the PRs themselves, as well as the way things work, for when you're working not assisting.

If, for whatever reason, you can't do that then I echo a comment above - Blow tend to lend to everyone, particularly if you have a publication name you're submitting to.

Thank you guys, you've both been really helpful. Think I will start looking for some assisting roles that sounds like the best way to go smile

May 07 13 12:19 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Star
Posts: 17,925
Los Angeles, California, US


1. Have a shoot already planned and ready to go.

2. Have an amazing photographer, well known MUA and hair and agency reppped models from an amazing agency. It helps if some of these people have a relationship with the showroom.

3. If it is not for a confirmed editorial you better have a photographer who has a track record of submitting spec pieces and having them picked up

4. get a pull letter, or expect to be left holding the bag should anything go wrong.
May 07 13 12:39 am  Link  Quote 
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