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Model
Sabina Kay
Posts: 4,426
Toronto, Ontario, Canada


I have recently full launched myself into the role of a full-fledged, business owner.

www.sabreup.com

Located in Toronto, obviously, servicing the GTA with plans to expand across North America eventually.

Currently in the recruiting process which is going fine but slowly (I'm picky about who I hire).

My questions are, for those of you who are veterans as business owners, what are some tips you would give to you a newbie as far as picking up clients? I'm going to be spending the next few days sending emails to people who I have met over the years, putting myself on their radar as a staffing agency. After I get through that list, I've marked off two areas (Annex and Liberty Village, for you locals) and plan on literally hitting the pavement and introducing myself to the owners.

I have my social media up and running (Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, debating LinkedIn for the company) and have hired a close friend to manage those for me and generate content to drive traffic to the site, etc.

Picking up business cards this week. I've been made aware of a networking event that happens at an Earl's downtown so I plan on hitting that on a weekly basis to see what I can get out of it.

Any other tips? Any advice? Anything you wish you had known or avoided when starting your business?

My one thing that I'm lucky in is that I have already been managing and staffing for events for a few years and, while I don't have a large database of clients yet, I do have a loyal few and I have a smooth process as to how I do things that works and keeps people happy and coming back.

Thanks in advance.
Apr 25 13 03:09 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Cherrystone
Posts: 36,208
Columbus, Ohio, US


Write a very detailed and comprehensive business plan. Without one, the odds for failure are high.
Apr 25 13 03:14 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Patrick Walberg
Posts: 42,518
Salinas, California, US


Cherrystone wrote:
Write a very detailed and comprehensive business plan. Without one, the odds for failure are high.

This is true!  With the Internet, it's easy to locate websites that will provide programs to help you write a business plan.  Tips?  Don't give up!

Apr 25 13 03:29 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
-Koa-
Posts: 5,250
Castaner, Puerto Rico, US


Amazon is your friend.

If you have an Amazon account, look thru the business books everyday and click the preferences from lowest price to highest price.

Amazon has several FREE business books each day. Some are cheap, others are so-so but a good chunk of them are really good. I have picked up dozens of eBooks each week that normally sell at $10 on up, some around $25+ and a few heavy biz books in the $69-$150 range, all FREE. These show up in an amazing variety of business subjects.

Do this for about a month and you will have amassed a nice library of business books which will help you in your new career.

Just off the top of my head, I would say I have nearly 3,000 business books on my Touchpad, all FREE, and those are just the biz books.

-Koa-
www.borikenwarrior.com
www.facebook.com/borikenwarriorstudiosmodels
Apr 25 13 03:48 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
J O H N A L L A N
Posts: 9,829
Santa Ana, California, US


My current company is in its 24th year and although this isn't necessarily about obtaining clients, it's one of the primary things I've learned to build and keep a successful business.

That is:
Grow your business organically - let it grow itself - forcing artificial growth by throwing money at it, can easily cause its eventual (sooner rather than later) collapse.
Apr 25 13 03:55 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Marc Damon
Posts: 6,562
Biloxi, Mississippi, US


Cherrystone wrote:
Write a very detailed and comprehensive business plan. Without one, the odds for failure are high.

+ infinity.
If you have no marketing/advertising plan and budget, you've failed before you've begun. In the US, almost any local Chamber of Commerce has a SCORE program which consists of mostly retired successful business owners who help new entrepreneurs with all the details and provide qualified advice on many issues. Is there something like that in Canada?

Apr 25 13 03:58 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Lovely Day Media
Posts: 3,947
Vineland, New Jersey, US


Generally speaking, failing to plan is planning to fail but there are exceptions.

  A lot has to do with what kind of business you're in, what type of ownership is in place, how many hands are looking for money out of said business and many other factors.

  I have personally only dealt with sole proprietorships as I don't like partners. The decisions that get made are mine and mine alone. Sink or swim, it's on my terms.  I try to make money when I buy things, not when I sell them. In other words, buy things as needed and at the right price. When they sell, it's a matter of "cashing in" on the purchases made.  Finally, at least in the beginning, spend as little money out of the business as possible for things other than what is business related.

  As for clients ... advertise. There was a story about a guy who got up out of his advertised bed, used an advertised toilet, shaved with an advertised razor and shaving cream, etc etc who refused to advertise his business because he said advertising didn't work. When he put a "going out of business sale" sign up, he was shocked at how many people came in.  They only came in because he ... yep, advertised.

  Don't spend all your money on advertising, though. Set up a budget. I used to spend 20% of gross profits from the month before on advertising. If I had a great month, I did what I could to keep it going.  Sometimes it worked, other times it didn't but the attempt was always there.

  You're much better off trying to keep the customers you have, though. For instance, if you're selling pizza and a client calls and says the pizza they got is burned.  Even if you know for a fact that pizza isn't burned, apologize anyway and send them another pizza. Whether you let them keep the first one is up to you to decide but in rectifying the situation, you'll keep them as a client and hopefully they'll tell someone else.  The numbers and situations change from business to business, but get a feel for it and let it work.

  If it's a new business start up, you may not see a profit for 3 years or so but if you lose less money each month, eventually it will be profitable.  You'll learn how to streamline operations and maximize potential.  You'll make mistakes along the way, too, but learning is part of the fun.

  Last thing ... don't take advice from broke people and don't tell others what you're doing, how or why. They won't get it and they'll frustrate you if you try explaining it.
Apr 25 13 09:27 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Solas
Posts: 9,486
Toronto, Ontario, Canada


what do you do?

someone i know asked me this ...he said to make it  abiweekly thing. before the business plan i suggest you take it into long consideration and it assumes you know your target audience

here goes..
" if you where to define your company, and its goals to me, the consumer, in two sentances, what would it be?"

i highly rec. linkedin
Apr 25 13 10:16 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Click Hamilton
Posts: 34,315
San Diego, California, US


When you launch, the first thing to do is spend less than you make.

If you want to grow comfortably, the next thing to figure out is what your normal cash flow should be in sales and expenses based upon your actual performance, then work to double your income and cut your expenses in half.

---

It drives me batty when people who have never done it say things like "it takes money to make money" and they expect someone else to give it to them.

It takes sales to make money. It takes profit to make money. If you have successful ideas and determination, the money will follow. You can explore, test and sell your ideas with prototypes and minimal cash outlay ... then figure out what you have to do to fill the orders. Without sales you have nothing but random unproven ideas, and "setting up a business" or manufacturing inventory is pretty pointless.

If you can't make sales, you are not in business. You can't sell products to your new desk, your new carpet, your new car or your new business cards. You can't sell products to that container load of inventory you just bought with someone else's money.
Apr 26 13 12:17 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Click Hamilton
Posts: 34,315
San Diego, California, US


More real life tips:

Listen carefully to the advice of those who are actually successful. Remember that appearances can be deceiving. For those who talk about it and have not been successful themselves, their words are hollow.

Amongst people who are successful, lots of them fell into it at the right place and time. Circumstances worked, and they worked hard then grew their business. They found a winning formula by chance and then run with it for as long and far as it lasts. Many of these people can not repeat this cycle. They just found a niche that worked, for whatever reason. Amongst successful people it's much more rare to find people who can start a successful business over and over.

     - In the first group of people, they tend to work very hard and do everything themselves. They out-perform everyone else in what they do. They tend to expand until they consume their time and energy.

     - In the second group of people, they learn to express their successful ideas through other people, and they learn how to expand themselves through effective delegation. These people tend to expand until the nature of their business changes and extraneous circumstances consume them.

     - Amongst any group, we are all unique individuals. We all have our own strengths and weaknesses. We need to learn to know ourselves and how to build upon our strengths and avoid our weaknesses. We all have accumulated skill sets and unique experiences to draw upon.
Apr 26 13 06:37 am  Link  Quote 
Model
Sabina Kay
Posts: 4,426
Toronto, Ontario, Canada


Cherrystone wrote:
Write a very detailed and comprehensive business plan. Without one, the odds for failure are high.

Working on it - wrote so many of them for school. PITA but useful. I'm kind of doing things as I go and rushing a little as peak season has already started and I don't want to to miss the boat on clients I already know are looking (from speaking to them last season).

-Koa- wrote:
Amazon is your friend.

If you have an Amazon account, look thru the business books everyday and click the preferences from lowest price to highest price.

Amazon has several FREE business books each day. Some are cheap, others are so-so but a good chunk of them are really good. I have picked up dozens of eBooks each week that normally sell at $10 on up, some around $25+ and a few heavy biz books in the $69-$150 range, all FREE. These show up in an amazing variety of business subjects.

Do this for about a month and you will have amassed a nice library of business books which will help you in your new career.

Just off the top of my head, I would say I have nearly 3,000 business books on my Touchpad, all FREE, and those are just the biz books.

-Koa-
www.borikenwarrior.com
www.facebook.com/borikenwarriorstudiosmodels

That's awesome, I didn't know that. The thing that concerns me about reading books, however, is that several of them are written by hacks and I'm worried I may learn bad habits. I mean, really, anyone can write a book and publish it but not everyone can run a SUCCESSFUL business, hence why I prefer to talk to people who have done it. I'm a skeptic when it comes to certain things and very research heavy, but only if I feel the resource will be of use.

John Allan wrote:
My current company is in its 24th year and although this isn't necessarily about obtaining clients, it's one of the primary things I've learned to build and keep a successful business.

That is:
Grow your business organically - let it grow itself - forcing artificial growth by throwing money at it, can easily cause its eventual (sooner rather than later) collapse.

I've seen that happen with several businesses - prime example being when I sold cars for Lexus. The dealership I worked at was new and had a decently sized ad budget a month (50 grand) but I was lucky to see 5 ups in a week because they weren't using it constructively or they were targeting the wrong demographic... So I learned from their mistakes and it was one of the main reasons I quit.

I'm also really lucky in the sense that my father was self-employed (construction back when we lived in BC) so I've seen him go through his hardships - obviously, I was young but I was always a bit of a bookish, serious child so I was always watching what was happening around me. Which now has just put the thought into my head that I should give him a call and ask him for advice. Sure, it's not the same sector but he had to find customers too.

Marc Damon wrote:

+ infinity.
If you have no marketing/advertising plan and budget, you've failed before you've begun. In the US, almost any local Chamber of Commerce has a SCORE program which consists of mostly retired successful business owners who help new entrepreneurs with all the details and provide qualified advice on many issues. Is there something like that in Canada?

I had a budget for both marketing and advertising from the very start. Again, business grad so I understand that it's important, even though I may not necessarily see results right away. Gaining reach is everything.

I know we have a Board of Trade (http://www.bot.com/) - not sure of anything involving retired business owners...

There is this - http://www.bot.com/Content/NavigationMe … efault.htm

I downloaded the sample files. It looks like the full file could be helpful. Again, skeptical though because anyone can buy the list so not sure how receptive these people are to being contacted.

Thoughts?

Lovely Day Media wrote:
Generally speaking, failing to plan is planning to fail but there are exceptions.

  A lot has to do with what kind of business you're in, what type of ownership is in place, how many hands are looking for money out of said business and many other factors.

  As for clients ... advertise. There was a story about a guy who got up out of his advertised bed, used an advertised toilet, shaved with an advertised razor and shaving cream, etc etc who refused to advertise his business because he said advertising didn't work. When he put a "going out of business sale" sign up, he was shocked at how many people came in.  They only came in because he ... yep, advertised.

  Don't spend all your money on advertising, though. Set up a budget. I used to spend 20% of gross profits from the month before on advertising. If I had a great month, I did what I could to keep it going.  Sometimes it worked, other times it didn't but the attempt was always there.

  You're much better off trying to keep the customers you have, though. For instance, if you're selling pizza and a client calls and says the pizza they got is burned.  Even if you know for a fact that pizza isn't burned, apologize anyway and send them another pizza. Whether you let them keep the first one is up to you to decide but in rectifying the situation, you'll keep them as a client and hopefully they'll tell someone else.  The numbers and situations change from business to business, but get a feel for it and let it work.

  If it's a new business start up, you may not see a profit for 3 years or so but if you lose less money each month, eventually it will be profitable.  You'll learn how to streamline operations and maximize potential.  You'll make mistakes along the way, too, but learning is part of the fun.

  Last thing ... don't take advice from broke people and don't tell others what you're doing, how or why. They won't get it and they'll frustrate you if you try explaining it.

Event planning/promotions/staffing, single proprietorship (saw my dad learn his lesson with that one), no investors.

Like I mentioned above, social media is going. Can anyone offer input on Google Ad/Adwords? I've been looking at it since I can't help but think that my demographic (after asking people in their network) will go to Google after.

My current customers love me and have all been repeat clients for all their events (at least to my knowledge!)

I am lucky to be involved with someone who is also self-employed so he can emphasize with startup costs, etc and does everything he can in terms of helping me establish contacts, advising me with marketing, etc.

Karl Johnston wrote:
what do you do?

someone i know asked me this ...he said to make it  abiweekly thing. before the business plan i suggest you take it into long consideration and it assumes you know your target audience

here goes..
" if you where to define your company, and its goals to me, the consumer, in two sentances, what would it be?"

i highly rec. linkedin

The Elevator Speech. smile

LinkedIn - make a separate account for the company? I have a personal one currently where, obviously, I have myself listed as the owner. Any tips as to how to use LinkedIn effectively? I'm rather new to it.

Click Hamilton wrote:
More real life tips:

Listen carefully to the advice of those who are actually successful. Remember that appearances can be deceiving. For those who talk about it and have not been successful themselves, their words are hollow.

Amongst people who are successful, lots of them fell into it at the right place and time. Circumstances worked, and they worked hard then grew their business. They found a winning formula by chance and then run with it for as long and far as it lasts. Many of these people can not repeat this cycle. They just found a niche that worked, for whatever reason. Amongst successful people it's much more rare to find people who can start a successful business over and over.

     - In the first group of people, they tend to work very hard and do everything themselves. They out-perform everyone else in what they do. They tend to expand until they consume their time and energy.

     - In the second group of people, they learn to express their successful ideas through other people, and they learn how to expand themselves through effective delegation. These people tend to expand until the nature of their business changes and extraneous circumstances consume them.

     - Amongst any group, we are all unique individuals. We all have our own strengths and weaknesses. We need to learn to know ourselves and how to build upon our strengths and avoid our weaknesses. We all have accumulated skill sets and unique experiences to draw upon.

I tend to fall into the first group of people - I'm a perfectionist and have oft been disappointed when I have delegated tasks to other people and thus have stuck to doing things myself or only entrusting a very small handful. My business is at the size where I can still do everything myself but, if I grow at the rate I'm planning, I'll have to hire in-house and delegate, which I'm not relishing as I know that a large percentage of people in my industry are all talk... I'm action-oriented.

Apr 26 13 08:58 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Click Hamilton
Posts: 34,315
San Diego, California, US


Lovely Day Media wrote:
Last thing ... don't take advice from broke people and don't tell others what you're doing, how or why. They won't get it and they'll frustrate you if you try explaining it.

That made me laugh.

I agree.

---

There are many ways to get to Bakersfield.

Apr 26 13 09:01 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Looknsee Photography
Posts: 20,987
Portland, Oregon, US


Well, yes, a marketing plan.  Some things to consider -- on your web site, the words "As Toronto’s newest premiere event staffing and promotional management company..." appears in teeny, tiny print at the bottom of the page.  Until then, I didn't know what you guys did.

You should be able to sum up your business in one breath. 
You should have an advertising plan.
You should offer incentives for referrals.
You should be able to give examples of events you've promoted.
etc.

You should pull together advertising materials, like business cards, brochures, post cards, etc.  Videos are nice -- ever see those mini-CDs printed on business cards?  Those are cool.

When starting out, network, network, network.  Get out of your house & away from your computer and go out and find ways to meet potential clients.

Good luck.
Apr 26 13 09:21 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Click Hamilton
Posts: 34,315
San Diego, California, US


Sabina Kay wrote:
I tend to fall into the first group of people - I'm a perfectionist and have oft been disappointed when I have delegated tasks to other people and thus have stuck to doing things myself or only entrusting a very small handful. My business is at the size where I can still do everything myself but, if I grow at the rate I'm planning, I'll have to hire in-house and delegate, which I'm not relishing as I know that a large percentage of people in my industry are all talk... I'm action-oriented.

I like keeping things tight and doing it myself too. I prefer making all my own decisions, taking the calculated risks, learning from the failures and reaping the sweet rewards to do with as I wish. It's smaller, but more enjoyable and more under control.

On the upsweep of the S-curve, I have to admit that I enjoyed the adrenalin. I'm an ADD kind of guy who thrives on these challenges. I don't mind taking all-or-noting risks, but I don't want other people to suffer the consequences if I make a mistake. Therefore, I have chosen to maintain a lot of independence, and I have been careful not to allow my sometimes "reckless" actions to impose on the lives of other people.

At this phase of my life, I want to maintain the corpus of what I have built in the past, and finesse the final phase of my life in for a soft and perfect landing. (That's the objective, anyway. Who knows? LOL)

When my business got big and was more visible, there were too many lawyers, scoundrels, leeches and other unsavory types distracting me from the part of being an entrepreneur that I love so much. I made a decision in 1996 to rectify that situation and dismantled the company I had built.

I enjoy working with other talented people on a collaborative basis - by contract, or commission, or percentage, or piece rate, etc. I give people plenty of room and flexibility to do their work, but ultimately, I make all the executive decisions myself.

I am very much a Theory Y manager who treats others the way I want to be treated myself - as artists, entrepreneurs and kindred spirits . For the parts that work better under Theory X management, I sub-contract.

Apr 26 13 09:43 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Carle Photography
Posts: 9,227
Oakland, California, US


Click and Looknsee are two of my favorite businessmen here.

I listen to what they say most of the time.

I say "most" because I'm still too young to listen all the time.

smile
Apr 26 13 10:42 am  Link  Quote 
Model
Sabina Kay
Posts: 4,426
Toronto, Ontario, Canada


Looknsee Photography wrote:
Well, yes, a marketing plan.  Some things to consider -- on your web site, the words "As Toronto’s newest premiere event staffing and promotional management company..." appears in teeny, tiny print at the bottom of the page.  Until then, I didn't know what you guys did.

It's in the headline of the tab when you open the page, no? I'm always open to criticism. What, in your opinion, would be better placement for that paragraph or some other alternative that wouldn't screw with the layout of everything else?

You should be able to sum up your business in one breath. 
You should have an advertising plan.
You should offer incentives for referrals.
You should be able to give examples of events you've promoted.
etc.

Elevator Speech, yeah. Advertising plan, yeah. Referrals - those are always promoted when discussing with clients, and I have referrals for my reps too, which is unique in this industry. Not many companies give payouts to reps for bringing in new clients, they'll usually just say they'll "try" to get them in the gig if the client books. I know because I worked solidly for five years, hence why I now have a solid referral system.

Examples - all fully laid out in Testimonials, or so I thought? Not everything can be decked out in the home page...

You should pull together advertising materials, like business cards, brochures, post cards, etc.  Videos are nice -- ever see those mini-CDs printed on business cards?  Those are cool.

When starting out, network, network, network.  Get out of your house & away from your computer and go out and find ways to meet potential clients.

Good luck.

Picking up the cards today, hopefully. What do you mean by post cards? Not literal ones? And I've never seen mini-CD's printed on cards. Do you mean a small insert on a business card that contains a CD? But then a card would be huge and wouldn't fit into a typical wallet slot, no?

Definitely agree on video - I plan on really plugging photos from events on social media (it's also part of my service offering - social media integration) and then video for potential clients to watch for the same reason.

Apr 26 13 12:52 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Sabina Kay
Posts: 4,426
Toronto, Ontario, Canada


Click Hamilton wrote:

I like keeping things tight and doing it myself too. I prefer making all my own decisions, taking the calculated risks, learning from the failures and reaping the sweet rewards to do with as I wish. It's smaller, but more enjoyable and more under control.

On the upsweep of the S-curve, I have to admit that I enjoyed the adrenalin. I'm an ADD kind of guy who thrives on these challenges. I don't mind taking all-or-noting risks, but I don't want other people to suffer the consequences if I make a mistake. Therefore, I have chosen to maintain a lot of independence, and I have been careful not to allow my sometimes "reckless" actions to impose on the lives of other people.

At this phase of my life, I want to maintain the corpus of what I have built in the past, and finesse the final phase of my life in for a soft and perfect landing. (That's the objective, anyway. Who knows? LOL)

When my business got big and was more visible, there were too many lawyers, scoundrels, leeches and other unsavory types distracting me from the part of being an entrepreneur that I love so much. I made a decision in 1996 to rectify that situation and dismantled the company I had built.

I enjoy working with other talented people on a collaborative basis - by contract, or commission, or percentage, or piece rate, etc. I give people plenty of room and flexibility to do their work, but ultimately, I make all the executive decisions myself.

I am very much a Theory Y manager who treats others the way I want to be treated myself - as artists, entrepreneurs and kindred spirits . For the parts that work better under Theory X management, I sub-contract.

Interesting that you bring up X and Y type management. I used to be X type (very drill sergeant, strict, etc) but learned (especially with models, who can tend to be younger, insecure, dramatic, etc), it's better to be more flexible, break the ice, while still maintaining a management role and demonstrating clear expectations with rewards or ramifications, as appropriate. I'm learning everyday.

Apr 26 13 12:55 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Click Hamilton
Posts: 34,315
San Diego, California, US


Sabina Kay wrote:
Interesting that you bring up X and Y type management. I used to be X type (very drill sergeant, strict, etc) but learned (especially with models, who can tend to be younger, insecure, dramatic, etc), it's better to be more flexible, break the ice, while still maintaining a management role and demonstrating clear expectations with rewards or ramifications, as appropriate. I'm learning everyday.

Y is good for brainstorming and creativity. X is good for making widgets in China.

Both together can make a synergistic balance, if you plan to make and sell something physical, like widgets. If you think up a sales stream from intellectual property, you might be able to avoid traditional production facilities altogether.

However you decide to define and manifest your products, I feel strongly that a zero-overhead virtual company presence on Internet is the place to build your business, now and into the foreseeable future. Open for business 24/7, anywhere in the world. Run it from your ipad.

Fun stuff.

Good luck Sabina smile

Apr 26 13 01:41 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Looknsee Photography
Posts: 20,987
Portland, Oregon, US


Looknsee Photography wrote:
Well, yes, a marketing plan.  Some things to consider -- on your web site, the words "As Toronto’s newest premiere event staffing and promotional management company..." appears in teeny, tiny print at the bottom of the page.  Until then, I didn't know what you guys did.
Sabina Kay wrote:
It's in the headline of the tab when you open the page, no? I'm always open to criticism. What, in your opinion, would be better placement for that paragraph or some other alternative that wouldn't screw with the layout of everything else?

So, it is in the headline at the top of the window, right there where I never read.  How about a terse blurb near/under/width the "SabreUp", right at the top of the page?

Sabina Kay wrote:
Examples - all fully laid out in Testimonials, or so I thought? Not everything can be decked out in the home page...

I have to admit that I didn't make it past your home page.

Looknsee Photography wrote:
You should pull together advertising materials, like business cards, brochures, post cards, etc.  Videos are nice -- ever see those mini-CDs printed on business cards?  Those are cool.
Sabina Kay wrote:
Picking up the cards today, hopefully. What do you mean by post cards? Not literal ones? And I've never seen mini-CD's printed on cards. Do you mean a small insert on a business card that contains a CD? But then a card would be huge and wouldn't fit into a typical wallet slot, no?

Definitely agree on video - I plan on really plugging photos from events on social media (it's also part of my service offering - social media integration) and then video for potential clients to watch for the same reason.

Well, I don't see those business card CDs often -- they are the size of a regular business card, with a hole in the middle & with rounded corners.  They actually fit into most CD players, and can contact a few minutes of video or a slide show or music or something like that.  You hand one of those suckers out, and you will be remembered. 

These CDs look like this:
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41Z-Z4ccozL.jpg

Check out... http://www.ideastage.com/Economy-CD-Bus … -511579953 (the first link I found).  It's big enough to contain a short video, I think.


Postcards -- well, yes, possibly.  I'm hoping that as you go along, you are accumulating a mailing list and/or an e-mail distribution list, and you can refresh your network with a mailing every once in a while.

Apr 26 13 02:10 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Solas
Posts: 9,486
Toronto, Ontario, Canada


Sabina Kay wrote:
LinkedIn - make a separate account for the company? I have a personal one currently where, obviously, I have myself listed as the owner. Any tips as to how to use LinkedIn effectively? I'm rather new to it.

About the same as you, have it all laid out and customized for what you want to attract. I had a robotics client come in last week from seeing my linkedin looking for some work done. Feel free to add me up too - may need my e-mail considering you're out of my network...but hey, I'm hoping to work with a few new startups in your industry..maybe we can learn from each other.

I find hubspot invaluable for a crash course in these networking sites..

http://www.hubspot.com/linkedin-for-bus … keting-hub

Apr 26 13 02:15 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Sabina Kay
Posts: 4,426
Toronto, Ontario, Canada


Karl Johnston wrote:

About the same as you, have it all laid out and customized for what you want to attract. I had a robotics client come in last week from seeing my linkedin looking for some work done. Feel free to add me up too - may need my e-mail considering you're out of my network...but hey, I'm hoping to work with a few new startups in your industry..maybe we can learn from each other.

I find hubspot invaluable for a crash course in these networking sites..

http://www.hubspot.com/linkedin-for-bus … keting-hub

We're connected! smile

What are you thinking of doing in the GTA? And bookmarked your link to look at later.

Apr 29 13 10:16 am  Link  Quote 
Model
Sabina Kay
Posts: 4,426
Toronto, Ontario, Canada


Click Hamilton wrote:

Y is good for brainstorming and creativity. X is good for making widgets in China.

Both together can make a synergistic balance, if you plan to make and sell something physical, like widgets. If you think up a sales stream from intellectual property, you might be able to avoid traditional production facilities altogether.

However you decide to define and manifest your products, I feel strongly that a zero-overhead virtual company presence on Internet is the place to build your business, now and into the foreseeable future. Open for business 24/7, anywhere in the world. Run it from your ipad.

Fun stuff.

Good luck Sabina smile

Thanks, Click.

Apr 29 13 10:16 am  Link  Quote 
Model
Sabina Kay
Posts: 4,426
Toronto, Ontario, Canada


Looknsee Photography wrote:

Looknsee Photography wrote:
Well, yes, a marketing plan.  Some things to consider -- on your web site, the words "As Toronto’s newest premiere event staffing and promotional management company..." appears in teeny, tiny print at the bottom of the page.  Until then, I didn't know what you guys did.
Sabina Kay wrote:
It's in the headline of the tab when you open the page, no? I'm always open to criticism. What, in your opinion, would be better placement for that paragraph or some other alternative that wouldn't screw with the layout of everything else?

So, it is in the headline at the top of the window, right there where I never read.  How about a terse blurb near/under/width the "SabreUp", right at the top of the page?

Sabina Kay wrote:
Examples - all fully laid out in Testimonials, or so I thought? Not everything can be decked out in the home page...

I have to admit that I didn't make it past your home page.

Looknsee Photography wrote:
You should pull together advertising materials, like business cards, brochures, post cards, etc.  Videos are nice -- ever see those mini-CDs printed on business cards?  Those are cool.

Well, I don't see those business card CDs often -- they are the size of a regular business card, with a hole in the middle & with rounded corners.  They actually fit into most CD players, and can contact a few minutes of video or a slide show or music or something like that.  You hand one of those suckers out, and you will be remembered. 

These CDs look like this:
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41Z-Z4ccozL.jpg

Check out... http://www.ideastage.com/Economy-CD-Bus … -511579953 (the first link I found).  It's big enough to contain a short video, I think.


Postcards -- well, yes, possibly.  I'm hoping that as you go along, you are accumulating a mailing list and/or an e-mail distribution list, and you can refresh your network with a mailing every once in a while.

Okay, there could be enough room right under the logo on the landing page.

I've never seen that kind of card before and that would be an excellent idea... Once I have video to put on such cards and once I've made a bit of money - at the price per card now, it's not feasible...

Contact list - in Excel as I go.

Apr 29 13 10:20 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Drew Smith Photography
Posts: 5,209
Nottingham, England, United Kingdom


There are many sources on the net that will give you all the info you need. I've been in business now for 25 years. Here are what I consider the stripped down version of what will make you successful in any venture.


1. Know your product.

2. Know your intended market.

3. Have/create a compelling reason for your market to want to buy your product.

4. Consistently promote your product to your market place through every appropriate medium possible.

5. Create 'relationships'. It's a truism that 'people buy from people'.  Deliver quality consistently and reliably.
Apr 29 13 11:57 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Looknsee Photography
Posts: 20,987
Portland, Oregon, US


Looknsee Photography wrote:
These CDs look like this:
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41Z-Z4ccozL.jpg

Check out... http://www.ideastage.com/Economy-CD-Bus … -511579953 (the first link I found).  It's big enough to contain a short video, I think.
Sabina Kay wrote:
Okay, there could be enough room right under the logo on the landing page.

I've never seen that kind of card before and that would be an excellent idea... Once I have video to put on such cards and once I've made a bit of money - at the price per card now, it's not feasible...

Contact list - in Excel as I go.

Yeah, not exactly cheap.  I wonder, if we look more, whether we can find blanks that we could load & label on our own?  I do know that if you give one of these to a potential client, they will remember you.

Apr 29 13 12:01 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Sabina Kay
Posts: 4,426
Toronto, Ontario, Canada


Looknsee Photography wrote:

Looknsee Photography wrote:
These CDs look like this:
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41Z-Z4ccozL.jpg

Check out... http://www.ideastage.com/Economy-CD-Bus … -511579953 (the first link I found).  It's big enough to contain a short video, I think.

Yeah, not exactly cheap.  I wonder, if we look more, whether we can find blanks that we could load & label on our own?  I do know that if you give one of these to a potential client, they will remember you.

To be honest, I don't have an issue with people remembering me or choosing to give me their business once they've met me and I've pitched to them - of course, doesn't help to be an ambitious, young, attractive female... it's finding those people in the first place (ie. clientele) which was the reason I started this thread... But I have received some wonderful answers! smile

Apr 30 13 03:21 pm  Link  Quote 
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