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Photographer
Valerie Eve Mercer
Posts: 16
Frankston, Victoria, Australia


I've worked with an experienced model and a few inexperienced ones and the difference is huge. If you're a beginner model and you think all you need to do as a model is look pretty, then you won't get far.

I'm only new to photographing models and I believe in giving beginners a chance, how else are they going to gain experience? But as a photographer there's only so much I can do to make a model look good and post processing isn't one of my favourites... I can think of much better ways to spend my time. So basically if a beginner model's photos are going to require a lot of touching up I won't be using that model again. I can get past them feeling a little shy and self-conscious because things like poorly maintained skin and hair are much worse in my opinion.

It's much easier to make a beginner model feel at ease than it is to remove black facial hairs that could and should have been bleached, plucked or waxed before a shoot.

So beginner models here is a list of things I believe will make photographers want to call you again:

1. Look after your skin - the most important things here are good nutrition, moisturizing and a weekly all over exfoliation (including knees and elbows and the sides of your nose where black heads and white heads like to hang out). For exfoliating try using white sugar or cooking oats, they're cheap, freely available and you won't have to worry about how much you're using. Just do it in the shower to avoid making a big mess on your floor. Also don't get fake tans, they look terrible in photos, in fact avoid tanning altogether unless you're going to go topless. Tan lines are a pain to edit out of photos. The more work you give a photographer to do after a shoot, the less likely it is he/she will call you again.

2. Shave/wax/pluck/bleach your legs, underarms, eyebrows, upper lips, chin, nose hairs (use nose hair trimmers), bikini area. Of course if any of those are going to be covered throughout the shoot then you don't need to worry about it so much.

3. Practice posing in front of a mirror - look at videos on YouTube for ideas on how to pose like a model and don't be afraid to put them to use at a shoot, it's the only way you'll get better at posing. It pays off to take modeling classes where you will be taught how to pose.

4. If you're going to bring some clothes, make sure they're clean and wrinkle free.

5. If you have any major scars and/or tattoos have the courtesy of telling the photographer before the shoot so that ways of covering them up can be discussed first.

6. Make sure your teeth are clean with no bits of food stuck between them.

7. Remove all nails polish, include on the toe nails, unless the photographer/client requests you wear some and in that case have it applied by a manicurist.

8. Check your make-up - smudged mascara, lipstick on teeth, poorly applied foundation are actually worse than wearing no make-up.

9. Be punctual. I can understand being a few minutes late because of traffic hold ups but if you're going to be more than 15 minutes late, call the photographer and let him/her know. Also, make sure you give the photographer your mobile number so he/she can call you if they're going to be late... it happens.

10. Wear skin colored knickers and bra.

11. If you're tense it's going to show in the photos, so relax and have fun!

If anyone wants to ad to this, please feel free to do so but please stay on topic as forum rules state. This thread is about giving beginner models some constructive advice not for criticizing me or other photographers.
Apr 27 13 06:14 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
_BlossomFairy_
Posts: 155
Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada


Valerie Eve Mercer wrote:
I've worked with an experienced model and a few inexperienced ones and the difference is huge. If you're a beginner model and you think all you need to do as a model is look pretty, then you won't get far.

I'm only new to photographing models and I believe in giving beginners a chance, how else are they going to gain experience? But as a photographer there's only so much I can do to make a model look good and post processing isn't one of my favourites... I can think of much better ways to spend my time. So basically if a beginner model's photos are going to require a lot of touching up I won't be using that model again. I can get past them feeling a little shy and self-conscious because things like poorly maintained skin and hair are much worse in my opinion.

It's much easier to make a beginner model feel at ease than it is to remove black facial hairs that could and should have been bleached, plucked or waxed before a shoot.

So beginner models here is a list of things I believe will make photographers want to call you again:

1. Look after your skin - the most important things here are good nutrition, moisturizing and a weekly all over exfoliation (including knees and elbows). For exfoliating I recommend white sugar  or cooking oats, they're cheap, freely available and you won't have to worry about how much you're using. Just do it in the shower to avoid making a big mess on your floor. Also don't get fake tans, they look terrible in photos, in fact avoid tanning altogether unless you're going to go topless. Tan lines are a pain to edit out of photos. The more work you give a photographer to do after a shoot, the less likely it is he/she will call you again.

2. Shave/wax/pluck/bleach your legs, underarms, eyebrows, upper lips, nose hairs (use nose hair trimmers), bikini area. Of course if any of those aren't going to be covered throughout the shoot then you don't need to worry about it so much.

3. Practice posing in front of a mirror - look at videos on YouTube for ideas on how to pose like a model and don't be afraid to put them to use at a shoot, it's the only way you'll get better at posing. It pays off to take modeling classes where you will be taught how to pose.

4. If you're going to bring some clothes, make sure they're clean and wrinkle free.

5. If you have any major scars and/or tattoos have the courtesy of telling the photographer before the shoot so that ways of covering them up can be discussed first.

6. Make sure your teeth are clean with no bits of food stuck between them.

7. Remove all nails polish, include on the toe nails, unless the photographer/client requests you wear some and in that case have it applied by a manicurist.

8. Check your make-up - smudged mascara, lipstick on teeth, poorly applied foundation are actually worse than wearing no make-up.

9. Be punctual. I can understand being a few minutes late because of traffic hold ups but if you're going to be more than 15 minutes late, call the photographer and let him/her know. Also, make sure you give the photographer your mobile number so he/she can call you if they're going to be late... it happens.

10. Wear skin colored knickers and bra.

11. If you're tense it's going to show in the photos, so relax and have fun!

If anyone wants to ad to this, please feel free to do so.

Great advice smile very helpful, thanks smile

Apr 28 13 12:58 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
MK Images Hawaii
Posts: 144
Honolulu, Hawaii, US


Valerie Eve Mercer wrote:
4. If you're going to bring some clothes, make sure they're clean and wrinkle free.

This!

I have had some models bring a duffel bag with a wadded ball of clothes jammed in tight. Makes those garments unusable.  sad

Apr 28 13 01:34 am  Link  Quote 
Model
Scarlett de la Calle
Posts: 414
Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, Australia


Valerie Eve Mercer wrote:
10. Wear skin colored knickers and bra.

My advise would be to make sure you wear seamless undies before a shoot and no bra. I never wear a bra to a shoot though I may pack a few incase they are required underneath or they want to take images of lingerie. Also all clothes worn to the shoot should be loose fitting or items that wont leave marks on skin. The top you wear if hair and makeup are being done at the shoot should be able to be pulled over hips to take off that way or unbuttoned so makeup doesn't get smudged and hair doesn't get ruined.

Apr 28 13 05:21 am  Link  Quote 
Model
Scarlett de la Calle
Posts: 414
Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, Australia


Valerie Eve Mercer wrote:
2. Shave/wax/pluck/bleach your legs, underarms, eyebrows, upper lips, nose hairs (use nose hair trimmers), bikini area. Of course if any of those aren't going to be covered throughout the shoot then you don't need to worry about it so much.

Also I would shave stuff like legs and armpits etc no matter what you think you are wearing in the shoot. You may think you are wearing all pants and show up and there are some skirts or dresses. Wardrobe changes and you don't want to stand there looking like a fool because you don't want to admit you didn't prep correctly for a shoot

Apr 28 13 05:24 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
B R U N E S C I
Posts: 25,319
Bath, England, United Kingdom


Valerie Eve Mercer wrote:
I recommend white sugar  or cooking oats, they're cheap, freely available and you won't have to worry about how much you're using. Just do it in the shower.

Cooking oats... in the shower? yikes

I hope you've got good drains!





Just my $0.02

Ciao
Stefano

www.stefanobrunesci.com

Apr 28 13 05:37 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Valerie Eve Mercer
Posts: 16
Frankston, Victoria, Australia


Scarlett de la Calle wrote:

My advise would be to make sure you wear seamless undies before a shoot and no bra. I never wear a bra to a shoot though I may pack a few incase they are required underneath or they want to take images of lingerie. Also all clothes worn to the shoot should be loose fitting or items that wont leave marks on skin. The top you wear if hair and makeup are being done at the shoot should be able to be pulled over hips to take off that way or unbuttoned so makeup doesn't get smudged and hair doesn't get ruined.

Some great advice there Scarlett, thank you so much for contributing this.

Apr 28 13 05:50 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Valerie Eve Mercer
Posts: 16
Frankston, Victoria, Australia


Scarlett de la Calle wrote:

Also I would shave stuff like legs and armpits etc no matter what you think you are wearing in the shoot. You may think you are wearing all pants and show up and there are some skirts or dresses. Wardrobe changes and you don't want to stand there looking like a fool because you don't want to admit you didn't prep correctly for a shoot

You make a good point here too Scarlett and I would also add 'chin hairs' to that as I've seen black ones on the chins of a couple of models and they're a pain to edit out.

Apr 28 13 05:51 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Valerie Eve Mercer
Posts: 16
Frankston, Victoria, Australia


-B-R-U-N-E-S-C-I- wrote:
Cooking oats... in the shower? yikes

I hope you've got good drains!





Just my $0.02

Ciao
Stefano

Apr 28 13 05:52 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Valerie Eve Mercer
Posts: 16
Frankston, Victoria, Australia


Valerie Eve Mercer wrote:

-B-R-U-N-E-S-C-I- wrote:
Cooking oats... in the shower? yikes

I hope you've got good drains!





Just my $0.02

Ciao
Stefano

Valerie Eve Mercer wrote:
Well they do break down quickly and if you only do it once a week it shouldn't be a problem. It's never been a problem for me.

Apr 28 13 06:00 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Valerie Eve Mercer
Posts: 16
Frankston, Victoria, Australia


MK Images Hawaii wrote:

This!

I have had some models bring a duffel bag with a wadded ball of clothes jammed in tight. Makes those garments unusable.  sad

Yes, because photos pick up the tiniest little imperfection not only on skin but on any other texture too.

Apr 28 13 06:03 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
ontherocks
Posts: 22,547
Salem, Oregon, US


i worked with a 19 year old who hadn't modeled since she was 16 and she knocked it out of the park. just amazed me. and her skin wasn't that great but so what? a little skin work takes care of that part. what she had was enthusiasm and posing and lines and creativity.

a photographer who works with the general public needs to be able to help out if the people can't figure out how to pose. you can't just say "well, i should have found a more experienced customer"

but i do agree that experienced models who take it seriously are a pleasure to work with. although sometimes their poses are grooved and it's hard to break them out of that.
Apr 28 13 10:12 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Carter Photography TX
Posts: 47
Houston, Texas, US


Yes! Wonderful advice!!! I have been modeling professionally for years before becoming a photographer, so I am very picky with my models, because i know the standard. Also here are a few more...

Models don't stay up late or go out drinking the night before. Your skin and body will thank you for it the next day.

I use pore strips on my nose and face the night before a shoot.

I use a wen deep conditioning treatment on my hair before and after a shoot.

It's very important for models to discuss exactly what they will be shooting before the shoot. Discuss your comfort levels. No surprises. No secrets.

If a photographer ever makes you feel uncomfortable, leave the situation. Not all photographers are creeps, but there are a few out there.

And always act with class and respect. Don't talk about you going to jail or drugs you've done. It's trashy.
Apr 28 13 10:20 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Jorge Kreimer
Posts: 2,374
Los Angeles, California, US


Valerie Eve Mercer wrote:
3. Practice posing in front of a mirror - look at videos on YouTube for ideas on how to pose like a model and don't be afraid to put them to use at a shoot, it's the only way you'll get better at posing. It pays off to take modeling classes where you will be taught how to pose.

11. If you're tense it's going to show in the photos, so relax and have fun!

3. I work with both experienced and new models. I would say that it's also the responsibility of the photographer to direct the model. Sure, you can let loose an experienced model, and if she's good and creative, she will give you a lot. If not, you'll still get something out of her.
It's important though to learn to work with new models. I normally have great results from non-professionals. One of my best selling prints was shot with a non-professional. What is important here is that the model is receptive to the photographer, and the photographer knows what he's doing and can give direction beyond "look sexy". Sometimes new models can be better for a specific project because they don;t have the experienced model tricks and vices. "Being" can be more interesting than "posing".

11. I also believe it is the photographer's responsibility to make the model feel comfortable.
When I shoot nudes, first thing I do is offer the model a robe. I look her in the eye at all times, and only see her naked through the lens. Eventually the model will forget she is nude, because for you there's no difference between nude and clothed.

A little "getting to know you" chit chat before she starts getting ready is helpful too. The model will realize that you are a professional, and not some creep who just wants to see her naked. I always show the model some of my best work before starting.
This will create an expectation of quality results, give her a point of reference, and something to strive for.

Apr 28 13 10:37 am  Link  Quote 
Model
Rebekah Watkins
Posts: 6
Laplace, Louisiana, US


Jorge Kreimer wrote:

3. I work with both experienced and new models. I would say that it's also the responsibility of the photographer to direct the model. Sure, you can let loose an experienced model, and if she's good and creative, she will give you a lot. If not, you'll still get something out of her.
It's important though to learn to work with new models. I normally have great results from non-professionals. One of my best selling prints was shot with a non-professional. What is important here is that the model is receptive to the photographer, and the photographer knows what he's doing and can give direction beyond "look sexy". Sometimes new models can be better for a specific project because they don;t have the experienced model tricks and vices. "Being" can be more interesting than "posing".

11. I also believe it is the photographer's responsibility to make the model feel comfortable.
When I shoot nudes, first thing I do is offer the model a robe. I look her in the eye at all times, and only see her naked through the lens. Eventually the model will forget she is nude, because for you there's no difference between nude and clothed.

A little "getting to know you" chit chat before she starts getting ready is helpful too. The model will realize that you are a professional, and not some creep who just wants to see her naked. I always show the model some of my best work before starting.
This will create an expectation of quality results, give her a point of reference, and something to strive for.

You sound like a very respectable and professional photographer! I hope to work with you one day!

Apr 28 13 12:27 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Rebekah Watkins
Posts: 6
Laplace, Louisiana, US


Valerie Eve Mercer wrote:
I've worked with an experienced llama and a few inexperienced ones and the difference is huge. If you're a beginner llama and you think all you need to do as a llama is look pretty, then you won't get far.

I'm only new to photographing llamas and I believe in giving beginners a chance, how else are they going to gain experience? But as a photographer there's only so much I can do to make a llama look good and post processing isn't one of my favourites... I can think of much better ways to spend my time. So basically if a beginner llama's photos are going to require a lot of touching up I won't be using that llama again. I can get past them feeling a little shy and self-conscious because things like poorly maintained skin and hair are much worse in my opinion.

It's much easier to make a beginner llama feel at ease than it is to remove black facial hairs that could and should have been bleached, plucked or waxed before a shoot.

So beginner llamas here is a list of things I believe will make photographers want to call you again:

1. Look after your skin - the most important things here are good nutrition, moisturizing and a weekly all over exfoliation (including knees and elbows and the sides of your nose where black heads and white heads like to hang out). For exfoliating try using white sugar or cooking oats, they're cheap, freely available and you won't have to worry about how much you're using. Just do it in the shower to avoid making a big mess on your floor. Also don't get fake tans, they look terrible in photos, in fact avoid tanning altogether unless you're going to go topless. Tan lines are a pain to edit out of photos. The more work you give a photographer to do after a shoot, the less likely it is he/she will call you again.

2. Shave/wax/pluck/bleach your legs, underarms, eyebrows, upper lips, chin, nose hairs (use nose hair trimmers), bikini area. Of course if any of those are going to be covered throughout the shoot then you don't need to worry about it so much.

3. Practice posing in front of a mirror - look at videos on YouTube for ideas on how to pose like a llama and don't be afraid to put them to use at a shoot, it's the only way you'll get better at posing. It pays off to take llamaing classes where you will be taught how to pose.

4. If you're going to bring some clothes, make sure they're clean and wrinkle free.

5. If you have any major scars and/or tattoos have the courtesy of telling the photographer before the shoot so that ways of covering them up can be discussed first.

6. Make sure your teeth are clean with no bits of food stuck between them.

7. Remove all nails polish, include on the toe nails, unless the photographer/client requests you wear some and in that case have it applied by a manicurist.

8. Check your make-up - smudged mascara, lipstick on teeth, poorly applied foundation are actually worse than wearing no make-up.

9. Be punctual. I can understand being a few minutes late because of traffic hold ups but if you're going to be more than 15 minutes late, call the photographer and let him/her know. Also, make sure you give the photographer your mobile number so he/she can call you if they're going to be late... it happens.

10. Wear skin colored knickers and bra.

11. If you're tense it's going to show in the photos, so relax and have fun!

If anyone wants to ad to this, please feel free to do so.

This is great advice! Thanks for your help!  As a new-to-the-industry llama, so many photographers are unwilling to take me on because of my lack of experience. But how do I get experienced if no one will work with me? I'm not that llama who thinks she knows everything, and I am eager and excited to learn posing techniques! I wish more people would put accurate advice out there for new llamas!

Apr 28 13 12:33 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
K E E L I N G
Posts: 39,806
Peoria, Illinois, US


Valerie Eve Mercer wrote:
post processing isn't one of my favourites... I can think of much better ways to spend my time.

It goes both ways, it's our responsibility as photographers to make our best effort to produce the highest quality product possible in order to keep new and veteran models alike enthused about what the creative process is capable of.

Telling them that finishing their pictures to the best of your ability isn't a high priority for you isn't exactly going to spur them to greatness and excite them into following the pre shoot directions you've given them.

Put forth the same effort that you demand of them, and you might be surprised at how the quality of the models you work with will rise.

Apr 28 13 12:36 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Valerie Eve Mercer
Posts: 16
Frankston, Victoria, Australia


K E E L I N G wrote:
It goes both ways, it's our responsibility as photographers to make our best effort to produce the highest quality product possible in order to keep new and veteran models alike enthused about what the creative process is capable of.

Telling them that finishing their pictures to the best of your ability isn't a high priority for you isn't exactly going to spur them to greatness and excite them into following the pre shoot directions you've given them.

Put forth the same effort that you demand of them, and you might be surprised at how the quality of the models you work with will rise.

Agreed, but this article is about what models can do to get photographers calling them back and I'm not saying I wouldn't call back a model who doesn't do everything I suggest here. It just helps make things easier for both parties when models are better prepared. I can't spend hours and hours photoshopping  the 400 or so photos I take each time I shoot and so I have to choose the best ones and work on them only. I want to be able to give models as many good photos as possible so they'll want to work with me again. But I never said working on their photos isn't a high priority, in fact it is because it's a source of income for me. I get started on them almost as soon as I get back home and sometimes it takes me hours to get one photo looking good because I think it's a great photo worth the effort, that's how serious I am. I think the quality of the photos in my portfolio shows this.

Please let's keep this thread on topic... it's about what giving beginner models some constructive advice.

Apr 28 13 03:40 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Jorge Kreimer
Posts: 2,374
Los Angeles, California, US


Rebekah Watkins wrote:

You sound like a very respectable and professional photographer! I hope to work with you one day!

Thank you! I look forward to it.

Apr 29 13 07:17 am  Link  Quote 
Model
K I C K H A M
Posts: 14,636
Los Angeles, California, US


Rebekah Watkins wrote:

You sound like a very respectable and professional photographer! I hope to work with you one day!

I'll vouch for that. smile

Apr 29 13 07:27 am  Link  Quote 
Model
K I C K H A M
Posts: 14,636
Los Angeles, California, US


These are all great.

The only one I don't agree with is #7. It's not practical in many cases to have a manicurist for every shoot, and if your nails are well-shaped, putting polish on yourself shouldn't be a problem.
Apr 29 13 07:31 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Valerie Eve Mercer
Posts: 16
Frankston, Victoria, Australia


K I C K H A M wrote:
These are all great.

The only one I don't agree with is #7. It's not practical in many cases to have a manicurist for every shoot, and if your nails are well-shaped, putting polish on yourself shouldn't be a problem.

I'm not talking about taking a manicurist to a shoot with you, just use common sense and have your nails done before a shoot. Poorly applied nail polish looks appalling on photos and some clients actually need enlarged prints and those show every little blemish.

Apr 29 13 03:28 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
LexLethal
Posts: 671
New Orleans, Louisiana, US


Kudos, probably one of the better model advice threads created by a photographer. Lots of good advice.
Apr 29 13 03:50 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Lillian Faith
Posts: 296
Atlanta, Georgia, US


Good advice. I'll add to it.

Bring various types/colors of underwear and bras. I will show up wearing my seamless nude undergarments, but I also have black and brown seamless, and well as nude and black thongs and "petals" for when I have to not wear a bra and my strapless bras. I keep lotion, makeup wipes, basic makeup, and a flat iron in my bag. You never know what will happen or who will show or won't. I also try to show up "bikini ready" in terms of hair.

I have a daily skin routine I do in the shower to keep my skin as clear as possible. I have a face wash with benzoil peroxide in it, and a body scrub with salacylic acid in it. Sometimes your skin will hate you during a certain time of the month and all you can do is try your best to clean it up as much as possible. For example, it's my finals week (stressed!!) and my ToM was recently. I still had to show up to shows and shoots. Stuff happens, just don't make a big deal about it.
Apr 29 13 06:15 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
K I C K H A M
Posts: 14,636
Los Angeles, California, US


Valerie Eve Mercer wrote:

I'm not talking about taking a manicurist to a shoot with you, just use common sense and have your nails done before a shoot. Poorly applied nail polish looks appalling on photos and some clients actually need enlarged prints and those show every little blemish.

I don't get a manicure for every trade shoot, and I'm not expected to. It isn't practical.

May 01 13 03:09 pm  Link  Quote 
Wardrobe Stylist
Tiffany_B
Posts: 1,338
Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, US


I think this is a great list. I'd add the following:

* Be realistic about what you're going to receive from a shoot: I'm amazed at the number of new models who expect photographers to give them every single unedited frame from a shoot that's TF*. Making demands like this drastically limits the quality and quantity of photographers that will be willing to work with a model.

* Understand that your role in the shoot is to showcase the clothes/product or convey a certain mood: As a model it's unlikely that you're going to personally love everything that you're wearing but you still need to look like you do.

* Read the release before you sign it: This just saves you a lot of time and questions in the long run regarding who can do what with the images.

* If you have any allergies or strong opinions speak up about them if they may be an issue: This is especially true on a set where hair, make-up and wardrobe is being provided, you don't want to break out or get sick because you didn't mention something. Additionally, if you're a vegan or anti-animal products and you'll be working with a full team, politely point that out.

* If you have to cancel do it as soon as possible: Things come up, just let your photographer know ASAP so that he/she can reschedule or find a replacement.
May 02 13 07:23 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Natural Means
Posts: 587
Sydney, New South Wales, Australia


Valerie Eve Mercer wrote:
I've worked with an experienced model and a few inexperienced ones and the difference is huge. If you're a beginner model and you think all you need to do as a model is look pretty, then you won't get far.

I'm only new to photographing models and I believe in giving beginners a chance, how else are they going to gain experience? But as a photographer there's only so much I can do to make a model look good and post processing isn't one of my favourites... I can think of much better ways to spend my time. So basically if a beginner model's photos are going to require a lot of touching up I won't be using that model again. I can get past them feeling a little shy and self-conscious because things like poorly maintained skin and hair are much worse in my opinion.

It's much easier to make a beginner model feel at ease than it is to remove black facial hairs that could and should have been bleached, plucked or waxed before a shoot.

So beginner models here is a list of things I believe will make photographers want to call you again:

1. Look after your skin - the most important things here are good nutrition, moisturizing and a weekly all over exfoliation (including knees and elbows and the sides of your nose where black heads and white heads like to hang out). For exfoliating try using white sugar or cooking oats, they're cheap, freely available and you won't have to worry about how much you're using. Just do it in the shower to avoid making a big mess on your floor. Also don't get fake tans, they look terrible in photos, in fact avoid tanning altogether unless you're going to go topless. Tan lines are a pain to edit out of photos. The more work you give a photographer to do after a shoot, the less likely it is he/she will call you again.

2. Shave/wax/pluck/bleach your legs, underarms, eyebrows, upper lips, chin, nose hairs (use nose hair trimmers), bikini area. Of course if any of those are going to be covered throughout the shoot then you don't need to worry about it so much.

3. Practice posing in front of a mirror - look at videos on YouTube for ideas on how to pose like a model and don't be afraid to put them to use at a shoot, it's the only way you'll get better at posing. It pays off to take modeling classes where you will be taught how to pose.

4. If you're going to bring some clothes, make sure they're clean and wrinkle free.

5. If you have any major scars and/or tattoos have the courtesy of telling the photographer before the shoot so that ways of covering them up can be discussed first.

6. Make sure your teeth are clean with no bits of food stuck between them.

7. Remove all nails polish, include on the toe nails, unless the photographer/client requests you wear some and in that case have it applied by a manicurist.

8. Check your make-up - smudged mascara, lipstick on teeth, poorly applied foundation are actually worse than wearing no make-up.

9. Be punctual. I can understand being a few minutes late because of traffic hold ups but if you're going to be more than 15 minutes late, call the photographer and let him/her know. Also, make sure you give the photographer your mobile number so he/she can call you if they're going to be late... it happens.

10. Wear skin colored knickers and bra.

11. If you're tense it's going to show in the photos, so relax and have fun!

If anyone wants to ad to this, please feel free to do so but please stay on topic as forum rules state. This thread is about giving beginner models some constructive advice not for criticizing me or other photographers.

To this I'd add gym/yoga/dance reasonably regularly ( any of them are useful and all would add dramatically to posing).

May 02 13 11:45 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Tabby Jenkins
Posts: 3
Avon, Ohio, US


I was always told to be sure and get waxed bald down there because depending on the fabric, stubble and hair might show through in close up shots.
May 03 13 02:19 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
ShotbyRon
Posts: 767
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, US


Great advice! Nothing drives me crazy like #7.

Some newer models seems to think we are magic and photoshop is some one click instant beauty program. I once had a new model show up to the shoot wearing no make up, hair wasn't done at all. I guess she just left work and was running late. In a situation like that, I would have been ok with her being an hour late! I was being paid, so I just rolled with it. But I had to put in double the time doing post work and still didn't get one useable image. I sent what I could somewhat save. Client was unhappy and thought I should just re shoot her for free. SMH
May 03 13 06:22 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
DLatrice
Posts: 218
Delaware, Ohio, US


I have a question. I have a shoot next weekend and I am basically a noob. Should I come dressed or get dressed there? I would assume come dressed just so we can get right to it, if anything come in flip flops and slip on heels when I get there. Replies welcomed..
May 03 13 06:43 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Michael Bean
Posts: 919
Mira Loma, California, US


This thread is full of super valuable advice BUT no one mentioned about building a reputation as a reliable model.  There are way too many FLAKES out there who will charge first class rates and give you economy service.  Once you have a reputation, you can ride on a lot of the little things.  KEEP SMILING !!
May 03 13 07:03 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Lillian Faith
Posts: 296
Atlanta, Georgia, US


DLatrice wrote:
I have a question. I have a shoot next weekend and I am basically a noob. Should I come dressed or get dressed there? I would assume come dressed just so we can get right to it, if anything come in flip flops and slip on heels when I get there. Replies welcomed..

If there's a place to change, change there. That way, you don't have to worry about getting anything on what you're shooting in. Wear loose clothes to avoid imprints left on your skin.

May 03 13 08:07 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
ShotbyRon
Posts: 767
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, US


DLatrice wrote:
I have a question. I have a shoot next weekend and I am basically a noob. Should I come dressed or get dressed there? I would assume come dressed just so we can get right to it, if anything come in flip flops and slip on heels when I get there. Replies welcomed..

Your best bet is to ask the photographer. In most cases I prefer the model gets dressed there. It helps avoid any wrinkles or mishaps. But depending on my schedule, location etc I might have them come fully prepared.

May 03 13 08:12 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
K I C K H A M
Posts: 14,636
Los Angeles, California, US


ShotbyRon wrote:

Your best bet is to ask the photographer. In most cases I prefer the model gets dressed there. It helps avoid any wrinkles or mishaps. But depending on my schedule, location etc I might have them come fully prepared.

This. smile

Also, if there is an MUA, it helps to wear a button-up or zip-up top or dress so that when you change you're less likely to mess up the hair and m/u.

May 03 13 08:58 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Expression Unlimited
Posts: 1,136
San Diego, California, US


Very helpful Valerie - thank you

I sent your list to 750  people who want to learn here 

http://www.meetup.com/Pro-Am-Photography-and-Models/

;-)
May 03 13 09:13 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Flex Photography
Posts: 5,264
Sudbury, Ontario, Canada


- If you have your cell along with you, put the ringer to "vibrate" or turn it off during the actual shoot. Keep any calling/texting to a minimum & only during breaks, as long as it doesn't delay shooting. Use it for select outgoing, not incoming contacts.
- If shooting lingerie or semi see-through garments, remove tags, or be sure they won't show.
- Be sure to arrive prepared to deal with any "women's issues" that may arise.
- Bring comfortable shoes for walking if the shoot is to be outdoors & any distance to walk.
May 03 13 09:53 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
ClothedModelLisa Renee
Posts: 9
Baltimore, Maryland, US


Splendid advice. You should make a video and post it on Youtube using models showing examples of both, the good vs bad (ie polished vs clean nails, etc).
May 04 13 11:09 am  Link  Quote 
Model
Axioma
Posts: 6,788
Gent, East Flanders, Belgium


Jorge Kreimer wrote:
[...]

11. I also believe it is the photographer's responsibility to make the model feel comfortable.
When I shoot nudes, first thing I do is offer the model a robe. I look her in the eye at all times, and only see her naked through the lens. Eventually the model will forget she is nude, because for you there's no difference between nude and clothed.

A little "getting to know you" chit chat before she starts getting ready is helpful too. The model will realize that you are a professional, and not some creep who just wants to see her naked. I always show the model some of my best work before starting.
This will create an expectation of quality results, give her a point of reference, and something to strive for.

May 04 13 11:22 am  Link  Quote 
Model
JadeDRed
Posts: 5,449
London, England, United Kingdom


Valerie Eve Mercer wrote:
8. Check your make-up - smudged mascara, lipstick on teeth, poorly applied foundation are actually worse than wearing no make-up.

This one seems a little odd to me, as the photographer, i.e. the one who is actually looking at us, it makes more sense for the photographer to point this out than for the model to be constantly checking up on it.

May 04 13 11:42 am  Link  Quote 
Model
JadeDRed
Posts: 5,449
London, England, United Kingdom


Valerie Eve Mercer wrote:
8. Check your make-up - smudged mascara, lipstick on teeth, poorly applied foundation are actually worse than wearing no make-up.

This one seems a little odd to me, as the photographer, i.e. the one who is actually looking at us, it makes more sense for the photographer to point this out than for the model to be constantly checking up on it.

May 04 13 11:42 am  Link  Quote 
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