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Makeup Artist
Brandi Bravo
Posts: 27
Fontana, California, US


Hello everyone,

I recently worked on a client that had a little bit of "peach fuzz" on her face. I noticed that when I applied the MUD cream foundation on her, it appeared to look more cakey because it sat on the natural fuzz on her face. I tried to blend the foundation out to give it a more sheer effect but didn't see much improvement. Does anybody have any suggestions on how to achieve a more flawless makeup application in spite of this?

Thanks everyone smile
Apr 28 13 12:46 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Gavin Poh
Posts: 229
Melbourne, Victoria, Australia


Wax it ;-)
Apr 28 13 01:19 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Thomas Van Dyke
Posts: 1,744
Washington, District of Columbia, US


Brandi Bravo wrote:
...client that had  "peach fuzz" on her face...

less of an issue if hair is close to the hue/chroma of skin tone...
If for a photoshoot illumination methodologies can do more than you can as a MUA

Brandi Bravo wrote:
when I applied the MUD cream foundation on her, it appeared to look more cakey because it sat on the natural fuzz on her face. I tried to blend the foundation out to give it a more sheer effect but didn't see much improvement.

SOP is to apply in the direction the hair lays... same with application of matte powder, you want the hairs to lay flat as possible here...

Brandi Bravo wrote:
...any suggestions on how to achieve a more flawless makeup application in spite of this?

If it is a model it is her responsibility to maintain her look...
In the short period she is in your chair there is no magic "fix" here

That said if it is a retail client you would benefit from having a good understanding of everything involved here... first if you are licensed esthetician you won't be asking this question. There are compelling reasons agencies that rep commercial level artist seek MUA's who hold an esthetician's license.

Caveat! The following is not to be taking as professional guidance but rather to alert as to options available.

For removal of facial hair electrolysis is the only permanent solution but is rather cost prohibitive... it involves multiple treatments that are expenses. Going into the  benefits/limitations of the different modalities of electrolysis isn't an option on an Internet forum.

Laser removal is not permanent, higher risk but is more cost effective.  Do your research.

Waxing is a common scenario, albeit should be done professionally... it is not that costly and done by a highly skilled esthetician can be an effective solution.

While the above-mentioned range in cost (possibly tax deductible for models) there are even more cost effective, short term methods that have gained wide spread use... most notably depilatory hair removal creams albeit these agents can be a major source of skin trauma even when used carefully as directed.  Strong, alkaline based product is never to be considered "safe" no matter what product hype may indicate... use with extreme caution!

An ladies, razors are for gentlemen... please do not go there... enough said.

Apr 28 13 08:18 am  Link  Quote 
Body Painter
Lisa Berczel
Posts: 3,996
Corona, California, US


Gavin Poh wrote:
Wax it ;-)

Not helpful attempt at humor.

A Makeup Artist isn't going to wax a model on set - even if they have the proper training/licencing to do so.

I've had several shoots be diminished by the model coming to set with excessive "peach fuzz". It can be even more of an issue with an intricate body paint.

Avoid shimmery anything in the area as well as the excellent advice posted above.

Apr 28 13 09:39 am  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
Brandi Bravo
Posts: 27
Fontana, California, US


Thomas Van Dyke wrote:

Brandi Bravo wrote:
...client that had  "peach fuzz" on her face...

less of an issue if hair is close to the hue/chroma of skin tone...
If for a photoshoot illumination methodologies can do more than you can as a MUA

Brandi Bravo wrote:
when I applied the MUD cream foundation on her, it appeared to look more cakey because it sat on the natural fuzz on her face. I tried to blend the foundation out to give it a more sheer effect but didn't see much improvement.

SOP is to apply in the direction the hair lays... same with application of matte powder, you want the hairs to lay flat as possible here...

If it is a model it is her responsibility to maintain her look...
In the short period she is in your chair there is no magic "fix" here

That said if it is a retail client you would benefit from having a good understanding of everything involved here... first if you are licensed esthetician you won't be asking this question. There are compelling reasons agencies that rep commercial level artist seek MUA's who hold an esthetician's license.

Caveat! The following is not to be taking as professional guidance but rather to alert as to options available.

For removal of facial hair electrolysis is the only permanent solution but is rather cost prohibitive... it involves multiple treatments that are expenses. Going into the  benefits/limitations of the different modalities of electrolysis isn't an option on an Internet forum.

Laser removal is not permanent, higher risk but is more cost effective.  Do your research.

Waxing is a common scenario, albeit should be done professionally... it is not that costly and done by a highly skilled esthetician can be an effective solution.

While the above-mentioned range in cost (possibly tax deductible for models) there are even more cost effective, short term methods that have gained wide spread use... most notably depilatory hair removal creams albeit these agents can be a major source of skin trauma even when used carefully as directed.  Strong, alkaline based product is never to be considered "safe" no matter what product hype may indicate... use with extreme caution!

An ladies, razors are for gentlemen... please do not go there... enough said.

Thank you for the advice! I'll be sure to apply in the direction that the hair grows. The color was very light and close to her natural skin tone, so it wasn't a huge issue nor did it distract from her beauty, I just didn't want it to look all splayed and fuzzy once I finished her makeup smile Thanks!

Apr 28 13 09:53 am  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
Brandi Bravo
Posts: 27
Fontana, California, US


Lisa Berczel wrote:

Not helpful attempt at humor.

A Makeup Artist isn't going to wax a model on set - even if they have the proper training/licencing to do so.

I've had several shoots be diminished by the model coming to set with excessive "peach fuzz". It can be even more of an issue with an intricate body paint.

Avoid shimmery anything in the area as well as the excellent advice posted above.

Thank you!

Apr 28 13 09:53 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Leonard Gee Photography
Posts: 16,346
Sacramento, California, US


Waxing or theading could cause redness just before the shoot. Short, fine light colored hairs can be ignored, but long or dark fuzz are generally shaved with a razor on the set. For beauty shots, it becomes a huge issue otherwise.

Anyone tried "no-no"?
Apr 28 13 11:15 am  Link  Quote 
Body Painter
Lisa Berczel
Posts: 3,996
Corona, California, US


I'm VERY LEERY of providing a chemical service on set.... so much so that I refused to use a similar product for a male model body paint. He went ahead and applied anyway - and we were scrambling to get the stuff off and neutralize the ph as we watched water blisters bubble up on his arms....

EDIT: I'm glad he didn't apply that stuff to his face.

EDIT, EDIT: I can't tell if No-No is chemical or rip the hair out or a combination of the 2.
Apr 28 13 02:58 pm  Link  Quote 
Hair Stylist
Meliha
Posts: 4
Toronto, Ontario, Canada


Waxing facial hair will be an issue afterwards because the make up will come right off.  I've had brides wax their sides/chin/upper lip a few days before the wedding and the make up comes right off.  Generally if you have facial hair like that your body is doing it for a reason, most of the time people that throw up food or don't eat get facial hair.  Keep in mind hair anywhere on your body is there to protect you and is there for a reason.  I think as a last minute solution there isn't much you can do, I doubt a model would even allow you to 'trim' the facial hair too.  You might just want to recommend something to the model to prevent this from happening in the future.
Apr 28 13 05:56 pm  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
Katy G
Posts: 286
Yucaipa, California, US


Thomas Van Dyke wrote:
An ladies, razors are for gentlemen... please do not go there... enough said.

Thomas, I am curious, why? I've tried researching this online a few times and could never get a good, legit sounding answer. I will admit, I shave my face. All of it, like a dude, with my leg razor! Upper lip, chin, cheeks. I've been doing so for a couple of years, now and haven't had any unpleasant regrowth (coarseness, darker hair, as I've heard supposedly happens). Am I just lucky/an untypical case? Also, maybe to be considered is that I didn't have particularly dark hair or coarse hair to begin with, just light peach fuzziness.

I'd like to hear an answer from someone who really knows their stuff, as I trust you do. smile

Apr 28 13 09:08 pm  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
Lindsey Sharon
Posts: 306
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada


Katy Gonzalez wrote:

Thomas, I am curious, why? I've tried researching this online a few times and could never get a good, legit sounding answer. I will admit, I shave my face. All of it, like a dude, with my leg razor! Upper lip, chin, cheeks. I've been doing so for a couple of years, now and haven't had any unpleasant regrowth (coarseness, darker hair, as I've heard supposedly happens). Am I just lucky/an untypical case? Also, maybe to be considered is that I didn't have particularly dark hair or coarse hair to begin with, just light peach fuzziness.

I'd like to hear an answer from someone who really knows their stuff, as I trust you do. smile

I've had bad reactions to just about everything on the market and I'm to lazy to tweeze. I shave my lady-stach! It's a hell of a lot quicker then anything else out there too.  I am a proud shaver!  Lady like or not.

Shaving can't change the texture or growth pattern of your hair. It just seems different since the ends are blunted instead of a nice soft taper. Hair thickness/quantity is genetics and diet!

Apr 28 13 09:14 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Thomas Van Dyke
Posts: 1,744
Washington, District of Columbia, US


Katy Gonzalez wrote:
Thomas, I am curious, why?

Katy, there is no single solution... the epidermis on one's face varies from day to day, season to season and everyone has a unique mix of parameters... If you have discovered a methodology that you prefer then you are at liberty to enjoy it... albeit unless you are licensed to treat the epidermis I would not practice on clients...

Reasons for and against a razor for feminine facial hair removal? cost & convenience is a plus... that said, shaving does not remove hair at the root, nor does it disturb the follicle. It's effects are temporary, lasting anywhere from a few hours to a few days. Of merit shaving can/will cause ingrown hairs this occurs when the cut hairs curl back into the skin instead of growing out. Ingrown hairs are especially problematic for women of color, who typically are prone to infections caused by the ingrown hairs.

Comparing this with depilatories which unlike shaving, does not leave sharp, hard, hair stubble just below the skin, depilatories leave a rounded, smoother edge - so stubble is minimized and regrowth appears to take longer. Still, treatments usually need to be repeated at least weekly... ingrown hairs with associated infections are not typically associated with depilatories...

But wait, as I have previously mentioned, depilatories are to be considered with extreme caution... see my post above...

Tweezing is consider a viable option for removal of hair on small areas of the face - such as the upper lip, chin, or eyebrows. Unlike shaving, in which the hair grows back the same size as the follicle, hair that is plucked grows back with a fine tapered end, meaning it is significantly softer and less noticeable initially, albeit it ultimately may return to its normal thickness.

Caution!  be certain to always pluck in the direction the hair grows... stories of over-plucked brows not growing back are numerous... I can't stress this too much... please know how to tweeze if you decide on this methodology...

Caveat! tweezing is not an option on set, it invariably will cause local skin irritation which can last for hours (think strap marks here, they fade ever so slowly). Dealt with this over the weekend for a bridal client... just don't go there in real-time... I always advise bridal clients to have brows groomed at least several days before the event... 

Waxing is also considered by industry professionals to be a more effective mode of feminine facial hair removal than shaving...  primarily from a cost/risk/benefit ratio perspective... That said, those who's career is dependent on their facial features are best advised to be under the guidance of a dermatologist and an esthetician...

Katy Gonzalez wrote:
...I'd like to hear an answer from someone who really knows their stuff...

Then I strongly recommend you schedule an appointment with a skilled esthetician who is licensed to practice in your jurisdiction...

all the best on your journey...

Apr 29 13 04:57 am  Link  Quote 
Model
Lillian Faith
Posts: 296
Atlanta, Georgia, US


Kinda off topic, but I prefer sugaring to waxing with hair removal. Less painful for me.
Apr 29 13 10:45 am  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
jmorrismua
Posts: 56
Chicago, Illinois, US


I have also found it extremely difficult for a cream base to not sit on top of the skin of a model with peach fuzz on the face. My quick answer and suggestion would be to use a liquid foundation instead.

Peach fuzz has been a big source of frustration for me. I'm leery to remove hair since you never know how someone's skin will react.
May 05 13 01:53 am  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
House of Westenra
Posts: 41
Louisville, Kentucky, US


Definitely be weary of waxing on the face.  I highly recommend it for eyebrows (prior to doing photoshoots, of course) but the skin on the lips can be particularly sensitive.  Waxing can also cause ingrown hairs (I wax practically all over and I get them all the time, despite the amount of exfoliating I do). 

There are some great depilatory creams out there formulated for facial hair, the formulation has come a long way. 

But some amateur models out there don't seem aware of the level of responsibility they need to take on their own personal grooming, so if this is scheduled ahead of time I would just remind them to make sure their eyebrows and lip/chin area are groomed and/or waxed, and ready to go.
May 05 13 08:36 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Marin Photography NYC
Posts: 7,235
New York, New York, US


two words - straight razor!
May 05 13 08:41 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
liddellphoto
Posts: 1,801
London, England, United Kingdom


From a photog pov this is an absolute nightmare to retouch (to the point of being impossible). I think if it is shoot day a razor is the only way forward and I have heard of beauty photogs suggesting this.
May 05 13 01:27 pm  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
Brandi Bravo
Posts: 27
Fontana, California, US


Jocelyn Marie Morris wrote:
I have also found it extremely difficult for a cream base to not sit on top of the skin of a model with peach fuzz on the face. My quick answer and suggestion would be to use a liquid foundation instead.

Peach fuzz has been a big source of frustration for me. I'm leery to remove hair since you never know how someone's skin will react.

Thank you! This is the kind of response I was looking for originally, I suppose (probably should have been clearer in my original post). Hair removal on set doesn't seem like the wisest option and probably isn't one that I would pursue (unless it was a rogue brow hair or something else not so "severe"-for lack of a better term).

What liquid foundations that you've used do you feel sit the prettiest on "fuzzy" skin?

May 06 13 05:35 pm  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
jmorrismua
Posts: 56
Chicago, Illinois, US


Brandi Bravo wrote:

Thank you! This is the kind of response I was looking for originally, I suppose (probably should have been clearer in my original post). Hair removal on set doesn't seem like the wisest option and probably isn't one that I would pursue (unless it was a rogue brow hair or something else not so "severe"-for lack of a better term).

What liquid foundations that you've used do you feel sit the prettiest on "fuzzy" skin?

I love Face Atelier *drool* I see why so many people on MM use it almost exclusively on their shoots.

May 08 13 07:51 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Sarah Lynn Modeling
Posts: 158
Asheville, North Carolina, US


As a model with peach fuzz, I recommend "Nair for Face."  It works really quickly, within just a few minutes, and there's no redness.  I haven't experienced any coarse or bad regrowth either.  I always use this the day before I shoot.  I would think as an MUA it might be handy to keep some of this on you for shoots?
May 09 13 12:55 pm  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
Urban Chic Beauty
Posts: 18
Rosedale, Maryland, US


I personally have had extremely bad reactions to Nair and other chemical hair removers redness irritation, chemical burns, scabbing. I would never use them in my  kit because you never know how the clients skin will react. What I had been doing is using one of those small eyebrow razors for the ladystache or any chin fuzz. I worked with a model with a decent growth of mustache. I asked her if I could use the eyebrow razor on her but she refused. What I did instead was color correct with a peach concealer in that area then applied graftobian cream foundation on top to full coverage it seems to have worked pretty well.
Jul 02 13 10:06 am  Link  Quote 
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