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Photographer
IMAGINERIES
Posts: 645
New York, New York, US


Do sometime are curious about the origin of a word you frequently use?...Like kudos..I thought it was Japanese, till I checked it.....
How about OK/okay?
Apr 28 13 08:51 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Leonard Gee Photography
Posts: 16,294
Sacramento, California, US


The term for that is: etymology
http://www.etymonline.com/
http://www.ipl.org/div/pf/entry/48468

OK at Dictionary.com
    1839, only survivor of a slang fad in Boston and New York c.1838-9 for abbreviations of common phrases with deliberate, jocular misspellings (e.g. K.G. for "no go," as if spelled "know go;" N.C. for "'nuff ced;" K.Y. for "know yuse"). In the case of O.K., the abbreviation is of "oll korrect."
......
    The noun is first attested 1841; the verb 1888. Okey-doke is student slang first attested 1932.

The complete article:
http://www.wordorigins.org/index.php/more/436/
Apr 28 13 08:56 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Looknsee Photography
Posts: 21,373
Portland, Oregon, US


Yeah.  I got a book on the origins of common phrases.  I read a page or two as I'm waking up in the morning.
Apr 28 13 10:17 am  Link  Quote 
Model
DivaEroticus
Posts: 14,646
Fayetteville, Arkansas, US


I'm a huge fan of etymology, which is one of the reasons I learned some Latin, and taught my daughter as much as I could.  But...I also have a foreign language base, so I can pull from old French and old German, too.  Others, I look up if I'm curious.  I've been reading the dictionary for entertainment and knowledge since I was about three.
Apr 28 13 10:36 am  Link  Quote 
Model
Courtney Piscine
Posts: 52
Minneapolis, Minnesota, US


Etymology is neat as hell.  Anyone here know a good iPhone app for word origins?  I'm sick of the dictionary.com app's half assed origin blurb (if you can call it that...) at the end of only certain words.
Apr 28 13 10:42 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
udor
Posts: 22,168
New York, New York, US


"udor" - Fearless warrior who rides into the sunset for more adventures...
Apr 28 13 10:44 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
noir
Posts: 288
Crewe, England, United Kingdom


Apr 28 13 10:46 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
NothingIsRealButTheGirl
Posts: 33,198
Los Angeles, California, US


udor wrote:
"udor" - Fearless warrior who rides into the sunset for more adventures...

Etymology of "udor"

http://www.modelmayhem.com/po.php?thread_id=79876

Apr 28 13 10:49 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Looknsee Photography
Posts: 21,373
Portland, Oregon, US


You might like the show America's Secret Slang on the History channel.
Apr 28 13 11:45 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
John Photography
Posts: 12,690
Adelaide, South Australia, Australia


I love expressions.

My favourite one is "snug as a bug in a rug" which is used to describe getting under warm sheets or quilts.

Would love to know where that came from. Anyone?
Apr 28 13 09:41 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Vivus Hussein Denuo
Posts: 64,120
New York, New York, US


DivaEroticus wrote:
I'm a huge fan of etymology, which is one of the reasons I learned some Latin, and taught my daughter as much as I could.  But...I also have a foreign language base, so I can pull from old French and old German, too.  Others, I look up if I'm curious.  I've been reading the dictionary for entertainment and knowledge since I was about three.

I came to that quite late:  around age 12.  smile  I've been enjoying reading dictionaries and readings in etymology and comparative linguistics ever since.  I've always been mystified that others aren't as fascinated by it.  But most are not, as I've learned.

Apr 28 13 10:09 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Vivus Hussein Denuo
Posts: 64,120
New York, New York, US


NothingIsRealButTheGirl wrote:

Etymology of "udor"

http://www.modelmayhem.com/po.php?thread_id=79876

I had always assumed that UdoR's first name was Udo, since I knew that to be a not uncommon German name.

Apr 28 13 10:17 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Looknsee Photography
Posts: 21,373
Portland, Oregon, US


Family legend:  My father claims to have coined the word "Hippie".  I don't know if it's true, but it is more than credible.  Dad was a songwriter, and he used the word "hippie" in the lyrics in a couple of very popular songs from ~1961.
Apr 29 13 08:25 am  Link  Quote 
Model
DivaEroticus
Posts: 14,646
Fayetteville, Arkansas, US


Vivus Hussein Denuo wrote:

I came to that quite late:  around age 12.  smile  I've been enjoying reading dictionaries and readings in etymology and comparative linguistics ever since.  I've always been mystified that others aren't as fascinated by it.  But most are not, as I've learned.

I started reading (and actually comprehending) VERY early, and had a larger vocabulary at that age than most have today.  My daughter (now 21) was the same.  She has teased me for years (by way of bragging to her friends) about my reading the dictionary "for fun."  How anyone wouldn't want to know how words began is a mystery to me, as well.  Comparative linguistics came easily to me having the background I do, but even without that, I'd still devour word origins.

Apr 29 13 09:46 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
John Photography
Posts: 12,690
Adelaide, South Australia, Australia


Can someone help me out.

Where does "snug as a bug in a rug" come from?
Apr 29 13 07:40 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Tim Little Photography
Posts: 11,554
Wilmington, Delaware, US


udor wrote:
"udor" - Fearless warrior who rides into the sunset for more adventures...

I've often wondered about your name. I read your post about how you shortened it. Very cool.

Is it pronounced "You Door"?

Apr 29 13 08:00 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Brian Diaz
Posts: 62,904
Danbury, Connecticut, US


Tim Little Photography wrote:

I've often wondered about your name. I read your post about how you shortened it. Very cool.

Is it pronounced "You Door"?

It's oo-doe are.

Apr 29 13 08:03 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Tim Little Photography
Posts: 11,554
Wilmington, Delaware, US


Brian Diaz wrote:

It's oo-doe are.

\

Thank you Brian!

Apr 29 13 08:12 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
udor
Posts: 22,168
New York, New York, US


udor wrote:
"udor" - Fearless warrior who rides into the sunset for more adventures...

NothingIsRealButTheGirl wrote:
Etymology of "udor"

http://www.modelmayhem.com/po.php?thread_id=79876

Damn'it!!!!!!!! big_smile

Apr 29 13 08:57 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
udor
Posts: 22,168
New York, New York, US


Tim Little Photography wrote:

Is it pronounced "You Door"?

Uh Door... smile

Apr 29 13 08:59 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Tim Little Photography
Posts: 11,554
Wilmington, Delaware, US


udor wrote:

Uh Door... smile

Thanks Udor!

Apr 29 13 09:03 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Caveman Creations
Posts: 580
Fort Worth, Texas, US


AdelaideJohn1967 wrote:
Can someone help me out.

Where does "snug as a bug in a rug" come from?

Here, lemme Google that fer ya...

http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/as-s … a-bug.html

How about the entomology behind the word "sinister"? It once meant "Left handed". So, if you are a leftie, you could be properly described as a sinister person. wink

Apr 29 13 09:24 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Vivus Hussein Denuo
Posts: 64,120
New York, New York, US


Caveman Creations wrote:

Here, lemme Google that fer ya...

http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/as-s … a-bug.html

How about the entomology behind the word "sinister"? It once meant "Left handed". So, if you are a leftie, you could be properly described as a sinister person. wink

And if you are a bumblebee, you might be studied by entomologists.  smile

Apr 29 13 10:00 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
John Photography
Posts: 12,690
Adelaide, South Australia, Australia


Caveman Creations wrote:

Here, lemme Google that fer ya...

http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/as-s … a-bug.html

How about the entomology behind the word "sinister"? It once meant "Left handed". So, if you are a leftie, you could be properly described as a sinister person. wink

Oh thanks. That was interesting and had no idea the phrase was so old.

Nice fact about lefties

Apr 30 13 05:59 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Snowmonkey Design
Posts: 4,633
London, England, United Kingdom


Hmm Bonfire...according to a historian on Tudor Monastery Farm this dates back to Tudor farms n was originally Bonefires as bones of dead animals were disposed of by burning them. It then got shortened to bonfire. smile
Dec 23 13 04:54 am  Link  Quote 
Model
Eugenya
Posts: 1,076
Toronto, Ontario, Canada


When I was little I was obsessed with words, especially their etymology.  I would run home from school, practice piano for an hour (which I also adored), then just obsessively pour over the dictionary absorbing words, words, words.
Dec 23 13 05:10 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
C h a r l e s D
Posts: 9,304
Los Angeles, California, US


Looknsee Photography wrote:
Family legend:  My father claims to have coined the word "Hippie".  I don't know if it's true, but it is more than credible.  Dad was a songwriter, and he used the word "hippie" in the lyrics in a couple of very popular songs from ~1961.

The west has a different version of the term "hippie."

Came about from the opium dens in the late 1800s.  People high on opium would get sores on their hips. 

That's what four or five books say about mining camps in the old west.

The word was in the Oxford English Dictionary in 1904

Dec 23 13 06:46 am  Link  Quote 
Model
JadeDRed
Posts: 5,420
London, England, United Kingdom


Leonard Gee Photography wrote:
1839, only survivor of a slang fad in Boston and New York c.1838-9 for abbreviations of common phrases with deliberate, jocular misspellings (e.g. K.G. for "no go," as if spelled "know go;" N.C. for "'nuff ced;" K.Y. for "know yuse"). In the case of O.K., the abbreviation is of "oll korrect."

Reminds me of cockney rhyming slang, which it took a long while to convince my friend is a real thing and I wasn't just having him on.

Dec 23 13 07:54 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Vivus Hussein Denuo
Posts: 64,120
New York, New York, US


DivaEroticus wrote:

I started reading (and actually comprehending) VERY early, and had a larger vocabulary at that age than most have today.  My daughter (now 21) was the same.  She has teased me for years (by way of bragging to her friends) about my reading the dictionary "for fun."  How anyone wouldn't want to know how words began is a mystery to me, as well.  Comparative linguistics came easily to me having the background I do, but even without that, I'd still devour word origins.

The combination of having taken German in high school and my obsessive need to analyze words and note any patterns caused me to become an amateur etymologist before I'd ever heard of etymology.  In my teens, I discovered the following:  English "follow," German "folgen"; English "[to]morrow," German "Morgen"; English "borrow," German "borgen," English "sorrow," German "sorgen."

I saw the pattern.  Where German has an r or l sound followed by "gen," English has that r or l sound followed by "ow."  I was fascinated, and left to wonder:  Why should there be patterns in the way two languages differ?  Thus began my forays into what I later learned was the field of comparative linguistics.  smile

Dec 23 13 08:01 am  Link  Quote 
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Model
Koryn
Posts: 36,554
Boston, Massachusetts, US


"Gams" was originally a word to describe men's legs. In the middle ages, when guys wore those funny little breeches, attractive, shapely legs were a big deal for guys. A man blessed with good-looking legs had "gams." That is a word now typically used to address women's legs. Used to be for the fellows.
Dec 23 13 11:03 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
NothingIsRealButTheGirl
Posts: 33,198
Los Angeles, California, US


"Implied Nude" used to mean...

actually, never mind.

big_smile
Dec 23 13 11:06 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Click Hamilton
Posts: 34,460
San Diego, California, US


Artifice wrote:
Etymology of "udor"

http://www.modelmayhem.com/po.php?thread_id=79876

You have a data retrieval memory like a computer.

How do you do that?

Dec 23 13 11:18 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Click Hamilton
Posts: 34,460
San Diego, California, US


Koryn Locke wrote:
"Gams" was originally a word to describe men's legs. In the middle ages, when guys wore those funny little breeches, attractive, shapely legs were a big deal for guys. A man blessed with good-looking legs had "gams." That is a word now typically used to address women's legs. Used to be for the fellows.

Gams and Guns ... any connection?

Dec 23 13 11:20 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
NothingIsRealButTheGirl
Posts: 33,198
Los Angeles, California, US


Click Hamilton wrote:
You have a data retrieval memory like a computer.

How do you do that?

I'm not sure, but so far I haven't been able to figure out how to monetize it.

lol

Dec 23 13 11:23 am  Link  Quote 
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