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Photographer
Wheeltracks Photography
Posts: 8
Grayson, Georgia, US


So, please do forgive me for this being probably a stupid question but I was wondering what everyone else's opinion on this is. I will not lie and say I am an amazing photographer, because I still have a lot too learn. I am still trying to build my portfolio and get into the side of photography that requires models/fashion and what not.

I have been trying to get models for shoots that i have been wanting to do, posting casting calls and what not. But I feel as though I am doing something wrong. Could it be the images that I have posted on my profile? I know a good lot of them are not necessarily "model-fashion" oriented, if that makes sense, but that is why I am on here and trying to build my portfolio with different models and ideas for shoots.

Does anyone have any pointers, advice, tips?
May 17 13 11:16 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
J O H N A L L A N
Posts: 9,743
Santa Ana, California, US


I can't critique you in the photographer's forum, so you might want to post in critique for some guidance on which of your photos are helping and which ones are hurting you.
May 17 13 11:24 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Joseph William
Posts: 1,958
Chicago, Illinois, US


getting started on MM is kind of a chicken / egg type problem...  You can't get models to shoot with until you have images in your port to show the quality of work you offer, and that you are "safe" to work with.

Pay some models to work with you (put up a casting offering 20 - 40 bucks for 2 hour shoots) try offering your twisted fairy tail shoots, but if no one answers that stick to something more generic like "casual fashion" or "edgy" see if that gets more bites.

once you have some work in your port it should be easier to get folks to TF and or except pay for your shoots
May 17 13 11:35 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
DougBPhoto
Posts: 37,556
Portland, Oregon, US


Wheeltracks Photography wrote:
So, please do forgive me for this being probably a stupid question but I was wondering what everyone else's opinion on this is. I will not lie and say I am an amazing photographer, because I still have a lot too learn. I am still trying to build my portfolio and get into the side of photography that requires models/fashion and what not.

I have been trying to get models for shoots that i have been wanting to do, posting casting calls and what not. But I feel as though I am doing something wrong. Could it be the images that I have posted on my profile? I know a good lot of them are not necessarily "model-fashion" oriented, if that makes sense, but that is why I am on here and trying to build my portfolio with different models and ideas for shoots.

Does anyone have any pointers, advice, tips?

Modeling is a job, and most people like to get paid for doing their job.

I've found that hiring a professional to do the job you need done is a great way to accomplish this sort of thing.

If I need electrical work done, I hire an electrician.  If I need plumbing work done, I hire a plumber.

If a photographer needs a model, finding a professional and paying them seems to work.

May 17 13 11:37 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
R.EYE.R
Posts: 2,755
Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan


Everything is relative and depends on what we all are looking for - models and photographers alike...
May 17 13 11:42 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Thomas Van Dyke
Posts: 1,454
Washington, District of Columbia, US


Wheeltracks Photography wrote:
...a stupid question...

the only "dumb" question is the one that's not asked... no apologies needed...

Wheeltracks Photography wrote:
How hard is it for you to get a model?

as mentioned above... talent needs to be given recompense... either monetary or tear sheets, clothing etc.... little else matters (in my humble estimation)...

Therefore the real question becomes how hard is it to find clients this is what commercial photography is all about... ask any commercial shooter and the answer is always the same... 80% marketing... everything else pales...

food for thought, your perceived worth is only as good as the worst image in your book... think about this every time you press the shutter....

all the best on your journey...

May 17 13 11:49 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
B R U N E S C I
Posts: 25,319
Bath, England, United Kingdom


Joseph William  wrote:
getting started on MM is kind of a chicken / egg type problem...  You can't get models to shoot with until you have images in your port to show the quality of work you offer, and that you are "safe" to work with.

+1

In my first few weeks/months on MM after 20 years away from model photography and with only a few old scanned images in my 'portfolio' I pretty much had to shoot with anybody who would agree to stand in front of my camera!

If you have any talent though, it soon gets easier smile

Remember to always aim to 'test up' - ie. always try to work with people you feel are better than your 'level' (whatever you feel that to be). If you think a model is way out of your league then maybe hold off messaging or tagging her for a while, but if you feel she's maybe or slightly out of your range then try leaving a tag and see if you get any interest back...



Just my $0.02

Ciao
Stefano

www.stefanobrunesci.com

May 17 13 11:50 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Armando D Photography
Posts: 557
Houston, Texas, US


not hard

email 1 - subject line - Would like to inquire for a photoshoot

body: Hows your schedule during the week "time" , and how much do you charge? this is the concept i want, and type of photoshoot.

email 2 - model - re: would like to inquire for a photoshoot

this time, and I can work "this day", my rate for that "type of photoshoot"

email 3 - re : re: would like to inquire for a photoshoot

great see you then on "this day"!! /give my # & address for location.

3 emails smile Keep it Simple.

Thinking your asking if your going in the right direction "to ask" not "if i'm good enough" right?
May 17 13 11:53 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Looknsee Photography
Posts: 20,855
Portland, Oregon, US


If you want us to comment on your portfolio, you need to post in the Critique forums.

I don't have trouble finding models -- in fact, I don't recall ever being turned down.  Some of the things that are in my favor (I guess):

...  I pay models.  My web site brings in a modest amount of revenue (donations), which is enough to pay models, web hosting, and ISP.  Why not share the wealth?

...  I am generous, flexible, and respectful in my dealings with models.  It is my goal to treat models better than they expect to be treated (and sadly, that is all too easy to do).

...  Many models like my images.

...  I don't try to be bestest buddies with models.  I'm friendly but I'm not intrusive.

...  I am well known in the local photographic community.  People (and especially past models) have very nice things to say about me.

...  I am an asset to the local photographic community.  I make the effort to share recommendations & references. 

...  I've been around for a while.

...  I don't like Casting Calls -- they are too passive.  I'd rather use the "browse" feature (or better yet, recommendations from people I know & who know me) and initiate contact myself.

...  I am thorough, clear, and terse in my communications.  I don't load my e-mails with flattery; I simply say what I'm interested in doing & outline some of the agreement parameters.

I'm also lucky enough to live in an area that enjoys a large number of wonderful models.

Good luck.
May 17 13 11:55 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
1472
Posts: 1,022
Pembroke Pines, Florida, US


Not too hard
Try try try again
Find a recipe that works
May 17 13 12:04 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
BrooklynHill
Posts: 4,790
Los Angeles, California, US


Start with models that aren't in high demand, shoot with them, make them look good (requires a bit of talent) and work your way up.  This is not a critique, but work on concept ideas and try to execute them. Don't just take a picture of someone, create a photograph. Good luck!
May 17 13 12:10 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Gallery-MG
Posts: 75
Arlington, Virginia, US


Persistence is key.

Also, it varies, the difficulty in finding models.  Some weeks it feels like you can't fit them all into your schedule.  A few weeks later there isn't one to be found.
May 17 13 12:10 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
AJScalzitti
Posts: 12,249
Atlanta, Georgia, US


Simply put the easiest way to get started is to hire good models.  Actually hiring models is the easiest period, far less work then trade or agency testing when/if you go that direction.
May 17 13 12:12 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
M Pandolfo Photography
Posts: 12,113
Tampa, Florida, US


DougBPhoto wrote:
I've found that hiring a professional to do the job you need done is a great way to accomplish this sort of thing.

If I need electrical work done, I hire an electrician.  If I need plumbing work done, I hire a plumber.

If a photographer needs a model, finding a professional and paying them seems to work.

You left out, "If I need a photographer, I hire..." Woops, that one doesn't work. Maybe, "If I need photography work, I send them my rates."

Seriously though, I agree with you. If the OP is having a difficult time attracting models, invest in a professional to "seed" the portfolio.

May 17 13 12:16 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Blonde Pony Photography
Posts: 142
Los Angeles, California, US


Paying almost always helps. Travel models are more reliable since they need to show to get paid and make money for their trip. Check travel notices to your area.
May 17 13 12:19 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Shandra Stark
Posts: 13,599
Los Angeles, California, US


DougBPhoto wrote:

Modeling is a job, and most people like to get paid for doing their job.

I've found that hiring a professional to do the job you need done is a great way to accomplish this sort of thing.

If I need electrical work done, I hire an electrician.  If I need plumbing work done, I hire a plumber.

If a photographer needs a model, finding a professional and paying them seems to work.

Doug has nailed it.

May 17 13 12:27 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
o k u t a k e
Posts: 4,660
New York, New York, US


Lower the expectations of your models or pay them. If you're a beginner, shoot with beginners. If you want someone more experienced than you, paying helps.

Better yet, start out shooting friends.
May 17 13 12:43 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Tony Lawrence
Posts: 18,978
Chicago, Illinois, US


OP,  you've been here since 2011 but only have five images.   What have you been doing.   You live in Atlanta, GA which is a large city filled with attractive women.   A few comments for some of our members.   Paying models make sense when you have a client or potential client.   That also means having a real direction for your work and style.   If its just for some 'pretty' pictures of women.   Hold on to your money.   Paying some of the traveling models might seem to be a good ideal.   Certainly you'll hear from more who will also expect to be paid.  Paying to practice could get pricey quickly.  Paying should mean producing work that moves you forward.   So that you can approach real world clients of agencies.

There are NO short cuts.   Don't worry about using 'models' and find attractive people who want to be photographed.   Don't be afraid to approach people.
May 17 13 12:46 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Anzhelika Yakimenko
Posts: 540
Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, US


Anybody having trouble getting a model should....email me wink
May 17 13 12:51 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Joseph William
Posts: 1,958
Chicago, Illinois, US


Tony Lawrence wrote:
OP,  you've been here since 2011 but only have five images.   What have you been doing.   You live in Atlanta, GA which is a large city filled with attractive women.   A few comments for some of our members.   Paying models make sense when you have a client or potential client.   That also means having a real direction for your work and style.   If its just for some 'pretty' pictures of women.   Hold on to your money.   Paying some of the traveling models might seem to be a good ideal.   Certainly you'll hear from more who will also expect to be paid.  Paying to practice could get pricey quickly.  Paying should mean producing work that moves you forward.   So that you can approach real world clients of agencies.

There are NO short cuts.   Don't worry about using 'models' and find attractive people who want to be photographed.   Don't be afraid to approach people.

These are two different things.  Should someone pay models for all the practicing it takes to get good at this? If I did it would have cost me thousands of dollars, on top of the 30 grand I owe Columbia. (heck if I paid all the folks I have shot with from MM this year I would already be out $760). Not commenting on OPs work if someone wants to learn how to compose and light people it would be best if they had friends to shoot (regardless of their prettines) or go to workshops or group shoots or take a class somewhere.

the question though is how (assuming ability to use a camera) to get models to work with you.  If you are just starting out on MM or have been dormant for 2 years you gotta prime the pump some how.  If paying a few models 20 bucks gets the ball rolling and opens more opportunities for trade shoots, that is pretty good ROI.

Also keep in mind that some people have more money than we do so spreading it around is not so hard for them.  Also too some people are less worried about ROI than we are.

May 17 13 01:21 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Sichenze Photography
Posts: 269
Front Royal, Virginia, US


THere are always friends and their kids. All parents want pictures of their kids. You can do a TF for a bit then who knows you can start to charge a bit too.  They just have to be better than the crazy uncle can shoot.
May 17 13 01:51 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Kerri Sullivan Photo
Posts: 98
Red Bank, New Jersey, US


One thing you're doing wrong is that you're male. = /   

Sorry. But I'm a female photographer and I've worked with tons of people from MM since I joined the site. We could all have a big argument about whether or not it's right, but I think a lot of young, female models just plain feel more comfortable with female photographers, especially when the photographer is new to MM and just starting out. I have a friend who is a model and she won't work with any males on MM who aren't already established or who haven't worked with someone she knows. I wouldn't be surprised if others don't feel this way, too.

So you have a few options for getting around this. You can link up with a female photographer friend (assuming you have such a friend) and plan a shoot with a model together. You can take turns getting some shots of her. You can also just keep photographing friends and friends of friends until you have more photos in your portfolio. I don't know your age, but if you're roughly college-aged, you could reach out to a local school's photography department and find some students to speak with about their models. If you make a friend or two who is a student photographer, they could probably suggest some models to you, either people they know or people they've seen in classmate's work. 

(Also, I know this is more critique-forum territory, but you might want to stick with more straightforward portraits in your MM portfolio. Guns, blood, and "dark stuff" can be a turn off for some people.)

Good luck!
May 17 13 02:13 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
ShotbyRon
Posts: 767
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, US


Use Facebook. I honestly hate this shit for finding models to work with. Out of the 25 or so girls I've shot with, only 1 came from here. That or pay an experienced model
May 17 13 02:14 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Matt Schmidt
Posts: 3,643
Greensboro, North Carolina, US


Anzhelika Yakimenko wrote:
Anybody having trouble getting a model should....email me wink

Smoking Hott !!!

May 17 13 02:22 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
BlueMoonPics
Posts: 3,931
New York, New York, US


It's like pulling teeth.  I'm in contact right now with a few models from MM and via fb.  The communication is spotty at best.  I'm giving up on them.

I don't use the casting call function here.  When I want to find a model I use the browse function and look and look and look.  Then I write to like 10 of them and get a few responses and maybe work with one or two.
May 17 13 02:23 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Fotopia
Posts: 1,085
Atlanta, Georgia, US


Having worked in a number of large cities, I can tell you that Atlanta is a rather underdeveloped community for reliable modeling talent, even if discussing rank beginners.

I don't subscribe to the Daisy Dukes esthetic, so my portfolio hasn't resulted in  local talents lining up by the studio door. Over 20 casting calls, even for legitimate paid work, have proven completely ineffective.

Resultingly, my portfolio has a grand total of 1 Georgia model, and zero  from Atlanta. The others are all agency talents who have been taught the value of continually doing test shoots to broaden their books and studio experience.

Try other venues, enquire at SCAD for their proven modeling talent, Paul Mitchell schools have many photogenic students, and you  can try a paid casting call to see if your luck improves.

Also consider some of the very reliable, professional travelling models as they could be an excellent way of building a competitive portfolio quickly. Many of the travelling pro models are "newbie friendly," and are less drama prone than some of the locals.

Good luck.
May 17 13 02:57 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Marciofs
Posts: 1,895
Freiburg, Baden-W├╝rttemberg, Germany


It depends on places culture. In Ireland it was very easy find models even when I started and didn't had any photos.

But in Germany it seems to be impossible. Where I leave even photographers doesn't like to meet up. I tried in several forums and nothing.
May 17 13 03:37 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
rp_photo
Posts: 42,488
Houston, Texas, US


Joseph William  wrote:
getting started on MM is kind of a chicken / egg type problem...  You can't get models to shoot with until you have images in your port to show the quality of work you offer, and that you are "safe" to work with.

A good way to kick-start the process is to secure unique props and locations and pitch preview videos or images to the models. Think hard as to what you may have available, and make finding and documenting that irresistible location your top priority.

May 17 13 03:45 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Optix
Posts: 223
Boston, Massachusetts, US


"How hard is it for you to get a model?" Get a model to what?

All kidding aside, if you cannot offer the "P" in TFP, then offer ca$h.

I have a feeling that you are not interested in offering money, and are trying to figure out how to get models to trade time with you.

Not a big fan of beginners paying hard-earned ca$h in order to learn something that only takes practice more than anything else, unless the ca$h is spent in something that will speed up the learning process.

Improve your skills prior to approaching models, because they do not want to learn with you, they want to learn from[ you, and get some great images (or ca$h - or both) in the process.

The models that DO want good images, know that a few bucks here and there is not the fastest way to upgrade their portfolios. They will sometimes test with the better photographers, and ask for monetary compensation from the ones with developing skills.

Unlike what most people that have friends that freelance, say...
a model (even a professional one) is not here to teach you photography.

Workshops or private instruction is a better use of your money. I know that models do not like to hear that, and they (and their friends) get enfuriated, but it is a FACT.

This formula is NOT true:
Pretty (or naked) models = better portfolio = better photographer.

A bad photo with a pretty model, is still a photo taken by a bad photographer.

Sign up for workshops in your area. Contact fellow photographers and offer to assist. The knowledge you get from the people behind the camera is priceless, compared to a bunch of very bad (and expensive) photos of pretty girls.

Once your have something to offer, which models cannot get from every other guy with a camera, then your problem will be a thing of the past.

Edit: Don't sign up to just any workshop. Look at the  instructors' resumes (both portfolio AND experience teaching).

If you are paying in order to be one of 20 students falling over each other trying to get some studio time with a model, then  you are wasting your time.

The person running the workshop should be TEACHING you, not giving you access to pretty "glamour" models, which is typical of badly-run workshops.

May 17 13 03:50 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Warrenjrphotography
Posts: 67
Hammonton, New Jersey, US


Optix  wrote:
"How hard is it for you to get a model?" Get a model to what?

All kidding aside, if you cannot offer the "P" in TFP, then offer ca$h.

I have a feeling that you are not interested in offering money, and are trying to figure out how to get models to trade time with you.

Not a big fan of beginners paying hard-earned ca$h in order to learn something that only takes practice more than anything else, unless the ca$h is spent in something that will speed up the learning process.

Improve your skills prior to approaching models, because they do not want to learn with you, they want to learn from[ you, and get some great images (or ca$h - or both) in the process.

The models that DO want good images, know that a few bucks here and there is not the fastest way to upgrade their portfolios. They will sometimes test with the better photographers, and ask for monetary compensation from the ones with developing skills.

Unlike what most people that have friends that freelance, say...
a model (even a professional one) is not here to teach you photography.

Workshops or private instruction is a better use of your money. I know that models do not like to hear that, and they (and their friends) get enfuriated, but it is a FACT.


A bad photo with a pretty model, is still a photo taken by a bad photographer.

Sign up for workshops in your area. Contact fellow photographers and offer to assist. The knowledge you get from the people behind the camera is priceless, compared to a bunch of very bad (and expensive) photos of pretty girls.

Once your have something to offer, which models cannot get from every other guy with a camera, then your problem will be a thing of the past.

Edit: Don't sign up to just any workshop. Look at the  instructors' resumes (both portfolio AND experience teaching).

If you are paying in order to be one of 20 students falling over each other trying to get some studio time with a model, then  you are wasting your time.

The person running the workshop should be TEACHING you, not giving you access to pretty "glamour" models, which is typical of badly-run workshops.

I agree with this to a certain extent BUT I do not agree with you that a pretty model will not increase the views you get and likes you get reguarding your portfolio.

Case in point, check out any nude photographers photos and he will have atleast have views in the triple digits even if his photo is "bad".

Also, when I first started out I shot a friend for the fun of it and then I shot my first model and the photos were taken using direct on camera flash and in my opinion sucked......they got a ton of views only because she looked attractive......having beautiful women in your portfolio will boost your portfolio thats just the raw truth.

You can take a photo of a beautiful women using the worst lighting possible and it will still get a ton of views.

Other than that if hes looking for a model to practice on I'd suggest going on photoshoots with your girlfriend as thats what really made me make the most progress as I used to go on photoshoots with my girlfriend as the model almost every day and I still shoot her on occasion or when I'm trying out different concepts and we both enjoy it, theres no tension, and it costs me or her nothing and we both get photos that we enjoy.

May 17 13 06:02 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Warrenjrphotography
Posts: 67
Hammonton, New Jersey, US


With that said, I suggest to the OP that he/she takes photos of his/her significant other so that you have some sort of a portfolio and then you spend a few dollars on a beautiful model, go to a beautiful location, and take standard photos by copying the poses that you already see people do on here and your portfolio will be boosted 10 fold and once you get a studio set up you can probably start to charge money if your business skills are up to par.

That's just the raw truth right there.
May 17 13 06:18 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
AJScalzitti
Posts: 12,249
Atlanta, Georgia, US


Fotopia wrote:
Having worked in a number of large cities, I can tell you that Atlanta is a rather underdeveloped community for reliable modeling talent, even if discussing rank beginners.

I don't subscribe to the Daisy Dukes esthetic, so my portfolio hasn't resulted in  local talents lining up by the studio door. Over 20 casting calls, even for legitimate paid work, have proven completely ineffective.

Resultingly, my portfolio has a grand total of 1 Georgia model, and zero  from Atlanta. The others are all agency talents who have been taught the value of continually doing test shoots to broaden their books and studio experience.

Try other venues, enquire at SCAD for their proven modeling talent, Paul Mitchell schools have many photogenic students, and you  can try a paid casting call to see if your luck improves.

Also consider some of the very reliable, professional travelling models as they could be an excellent way of building a competitive portfolio quickly. Many of the travelling pro models are "newbie friendly," and are less drama prone than some of the locals.

Good luck.

All of mine are from Atlanta minus the retro pinup of Jessi June that I recently reposted.  I have a shoot in the morning using 3 professional models (Factor and Click) from Atlanta.

Its not a problem to find great talent in Atlanta, perhaps there are more commercial models than fashion but there are still plenty of choices.

May 17 13 06:18 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Dark Shadows
Posts: 2,269
Miami, Florida, US


That depends. For anything that doesn't involve nudity I would classify it as very easy to find a model.

Finding nude friendly models is more difficult, but I also think it's more rewarding to the point that I prefer them even for non-nude concepts. It's just a different mindset.
May 17 13 06:28 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
AJScalzitti
Posts: 12,249
Atlanta, Georgia, US


Anzhelika Yakimenko wrote:
Anybody having trouble getting a model should....email me wink

That is a fine idea smile

(hope you are doing well this summer)

May 17 13 06:38 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Wheeltracks Photography
Posts: 8
Grayson, Georgia, US


Thank you all for your responses. Greatly appreciated. I have been having an issue with myself as far as having the competence to "test up" as someone in a previous post. I know what I am doing, I have a knowledge of lighting, posting, what looks good and what does not. and i have ideas to shoot. I do agree though that I don't necessarily need to do photoshoots based around the "twisted fairy tale" aspect that I have been wanting to do. I do need more "generic" if you will style shots in my portfolio as well. And honestly, on the fact of compensation. I do not have the amount of money to offer models to shoot with me. I am still a student in school building my final portfolio and have not had many opportunities to have paid gigs if you will. It's but I am devoted to the craft, which is why I would never ask to shoot someone if I didn't feel competent in shooting them, but compensation other then "for trade" is at this point out of the question in a sense.

Also to answer this question regarding why I only have 5 images on the profile and I have been here since 2011. That is because when I first signed up, I was not taking it up as seriously I am now. Modeling at first was never my intent. I originally loved wedding photography and children/family portraits. It's only recently that I have gotten into shooting models.

A good friend of mine who is very good ad what he doe and shoots a lot of models for agencies and for his personal portfolio building from time to time is helping me but there is still much to learn. you can have all the technical knowledge and know how and know a camera like the back of your hand, but if you can't direct well and have a vision for what a picture will look like, especially in terms of models and what, thats where the issue lies. and lies for me.
May 17 13 07:42 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Warrenjrphotography
Posts: 67
Hammonton, New Jersey, US


Wheeltracks Photography wrote:
Thank you all for your responses. Greatly appreciated. I have been having an issue with myself as far as having the competence to "test up" as someone in a previous post. I know what I am doing, I have a knowledge of lighting, posting, what looks good and what does not. and i have ideas to shoot. I do agree though that I don't necessarily need to do photoshoots based around the "twisted fairy tale" aspect that I have been wanting to do. I do need more "generic" if you will style shots in my portfolio as well. And honestly, on the fact of compensation. I do not have the amount of money to offer models to shoot with me. I am still a student in school building my final portfolio and have not had many opportunities to have paid gigs if you will. It's but I am devoted to the craft, which is why I would never ask to shoot someone if I didn't feel competent in shooting them, but compensation other then "for trade" is at this point out of the question in a sense.

Also to answer this question regarding why I only have 5 images on the profile and I have been here since 2011. That is because when I first signed up, I was not taking it up as seriously I am now. Modeling at first was never my intent. I originally loved wedding photography and children/family portraits. It's only recently that I have gotten into shooting models.

A good friend of mine who is very good ad what he doe and shoots a lot of models for agencies and for his personal portfolio building from time to time is helping me but there is still much to learn. you can have all the technical knowledge and know how and know a camera like the back of your hand, but if you can't direct well and have a vision for what a picture will look like, especially in terms of models and what, thats where the issue lies. and lies for me.

I personally say continue to shoot photos that are your style but consider them more of projects as most people more than liekly won't pay for them right away and plus you shoot those photos for fun.

As far as vision goes, I don't really buy into that as most of the photographers that I have worked with have a laptop loaded with poses on them so that they can show their model on the spot what pose to do or they direct them by looking at the poses.

Even the simplest poses can look good as well and most good models know what poses look good already and fit their style.

If you have the understanding of lighting and everything else I'd start to charge money and advertise yourself & get a website up and only do TFP for your personal project photoshoots.

Just my $0.02.

May 17 13 08:06 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
PictureItYakima
Posts: 372
Seattle, Washington, US


Anzhelika Yakimenko wrote:
Anybody having trouble getting a model should....email me wink

^
+1

Seriously dude. Looks like July will be your month.

May 17 13 08:08 pm  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
Jessica Vaugn Makeup
Posts: 258
Atlanta, Georgia, US


You should probably ditch the silly themed shoots (in your casting titles) no one really cares about and focus on development of your skill sets. Ideas/themes should come AFTER you learn the basics.

I'd hire a mentor locally.
If I were a new photographer in Georgia interested in developing a fashion book, I'd contact Laretta in Atlanta about training rates and if you are broke, volunteer to assist her for free and simply observe hoe she does what.

http://www.larettahouston.com/

Good luck!
May 17 13 08:17 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Tony Lawrence
Posts: 18,978
Chicago, Illinois, US


Joseph William  wrote:

These are two different things.  Should someone pay models for all the practicing it takes to get good at this? If I did it would have cost me thousands of dollars, on top of the 30 grand I owe Columbia. (heck if I paid all the folks I have shot with from MM this year I would already be out $760). Not commenting on OPs work if someone wants to learn how to compose and light people it would be best if they had friends to shoot (regardless of their prettines) or go to workshops or group shoots or take a class somewhere.

the question though is how (assuming ability to use a camera) to get models to work with you.  If you are just starting out on MM or have been dormant for 2 years you gotta prime the pump some how.  If paying a few models 20 bucks gets the ball rolling and opens more opportunities for trade shoots, that is pretty good ROI.

Also keep in mind that some people have more money than we do so spreading it around is not so hard for them.  Also too some people are less worried about ROI than we are.

Joe... You're making this difficult because I did review the OP the work.   This isn't a critique thread but I would say right now it might be better to find friends and people who want to be photographed rather then investing in models.   There is nothing wrong with paying models.   I have and do and that isn't too say I'm better then the OP.   Your workshop suggestion is good.   There are lots of small group shoots around.   If it were as simple as paying a few beautiful models from MM to radically improve my work.   Sign me up but no camera or model is going to shine up the turds I produce.   Its been my experience that when people say they can't do a thing its because they haven't really tried.   

The OP has been here two years and has ten friends.    If you want to get models then you have to be be proactive.   If you can't pay then find local designers who might trade with you.   You can offer dresses to shoot in.   No designers?   Go on Ebay and find dresses.   I have found nice ones under $25.00.   That could be offered in addition to the images.   Be creative is the ideal.   When I lived in Texas I asked women who went to my health club too shoot.

May 17 13 08:38 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
rp_photo
Posts: 42,488
Houston, Texas, US


As a general rule, it fairly easy to get any type of modeling for TF except for "mainstream" female nudes.
May 17 13 08:48 pm  Link  Quote 
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