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Photographer
Silvia D Photography
Posts: 9
Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom


Hi all,

I have been playing with a Nikon D40 for quite a while and I as I have some money now I want to update my gear.
My current lenses: Nikkor 18-55, 55-200, 35mm

I was thinking D7000 but heard about the focus issues and I'm not sure how bad they are. If I get the D7000 should I still get the kit lens for it? (I kinda already have that range from my other lenses)

People are advising D90 (But I would prefer the higher ISO) or a full frame D300 (but I can't afford new lenses:( )

What do you think?

What about a good flash? Was thinking Nikon sb-700?

Any advice would be appreciated.
May 19 13 05:50 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
pdxROCKpix
Posts: 117
Hillsboro, Oregon, US


D300 isn't full frame, it's still a crop.

People are recommending the D90 because it's a very good camera. Don't let the fact that it's been around for awhile fool you. I've seen some very good pictures taken with D90s.
May 19 13 06:33 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Photos by Lorrin
Posts: 6,903
Eugene, Oregon, US


D7000 has issues like every other camera Nikon makes - but most issues in quality control are solved quickly.

I have not seen focus issues with mine.

The 18-105 lens is a very good range and the one I know of is very sharp.
May 19 13 07:37 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
ELiffmann
Posts: 1,388
Baton Rouge, Louisiana, US


Are you talking about the af fine-tune?  Totally not a big deal. D300 and 7000 will roughly be the same price. I think you meant 6/700. Age difference between 90/300 and 7000 is significant.  Check out tests at dp review at higher isos. Depends on what you're shooting but I'd say 300s for sports and 7000 for pretty much everything else. G'luck
May 19 13 08:30 am  Link  Quote 
Clothing Designer
GRMACK
Posts: 1,611
Bakersfield, California, US


Fwiw, when I was in Nikon in LA to get some "new stuff" fixed (Their factory Q.C. sure lags at times!), I asked the customer service girl "What Nikon would she buy?"  She said "A D90" without hesitation.  Go figger.
May 19 13 09:02 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Silvia D Photography
Posts: 9
Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom


Thank you for the advises.

I can see that the opinions are again either d7000 or d90. Which makes it difficult for me sad
I think d7000 is what attracts me most but I would like to know why I shouldn't buy it and go for something else if there is a good reason.


Regarding to the kit lens - if I already have 18-55 and 55-200 is there a point to but the 18-105? Except for the fact that it will be one lens instead of two?
May 19 13 09:30 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
pdxROCKpix
Posts: 117
Hillsboro, Oregon, US


Get rid of both the kit lenses and buy a better one. Both of them aren't very good. Figure out what focal length you need and start with one good lens then add more as money allows. Even the 50 f/1.8 which is only about $200 is much better than either of the kit lenses. This is a place where buying used can really save you some money.

As far as e D90 vs D7000 you really need to think about what you need for the type of photography you want to do and then research the pros and cons of each camera. They are both going to have areas where they are better or worse and in the end only you can decide which one will suit you best.
May 19 13 09:38 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Photography of Eddie
Posts: 39
Antioch, California, US


Silvia D Photography wrote:
I can see that the opinions are again either d7000 or d90. Which makes it difficult for me sad
I think d7000 is what attracts me most but I would like to know why I shouldn't buy it and go for something else if there is a good reason.

....I'd say go with your gut, the one you are drawn to most. If you don't pick that one then you'll always wonder what if you would've went with your gut feeling... They are both real good cameras and all cameras will have some minor issues, like cars do, nothing is perfect!  I had the same dilemma a few months back D90 or 7000....spent a whole month researching, going over the pros and cons of both before I made my move. Ultimatley I went with my intuition and haven't looked back!

May 19 13 11:40 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Erlinda
Posts: 7,036
London, England, United Kingdom


I honestly don't understand why people spend so much money on equipment. Just buy a camera that has the amount of pixels you would like, full frame (if you want) and your done.

I mean I use a film lens that was made the year I was born (1987) and it works fine and does what I need it to do (all my photos are shot with that lens and it cost 100 bucks big_smile ). There is no need to go crazy just because you have the money. If anything I recommend you buy hard-drives and a nice laptop (those are way more important)
May 19 13 11:46 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Mark Salo
Posts: 8,009
Olney, Maryland, US


I recommend that you hold off on buying lenses until you know what YOU need.

Re flash: If you will be using iTTL on camera or remote, Nikons give the best compatibility.  Youngo (sp?) have a range of less expensive units and are well recommended.

Silvia D Photography wrote:
If I get the D7000 should I still get the kit lens for it? (I kinda already have that range from my other lenses)

No, get the body and stay with what you have.

May 19 13 11:57 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
DOUGLASFOTOS
Posts: 7,961
Los Angeles, California, US


May 19 13 12:17 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Guy Frotto
Posts: 67
San Francisco, California, US


Silvia D Photography wrote:
People are advising D90 (But I would prefer the higher ISO) or a full frame D300 (but I can't afford new lenses:( )

What do you think?

What about a good flash? Was thinking Nikon sb-700?

Any advice would be appreciated.

Let me correct that the D300 is not a full frame camera. It is still a crop sensor camera, which is very much dated.

New camera bodies come out every few years so it is hard to keep up with them. Make your decisions based on your budget and needs.

As you gain more experience in the field of photography, you will realize having good lenses is more important than camera bodies. I'm not arguing that having the latest camera body is not important.

The point is learning photography skills is as important as having the latest gadgets. The flagship camera body lets you capture images faster, easier, and more durable.

Photography skills are still required for proper composition and skills require lots of practice. Buying the latest camera body without using it or not getting enough use is worst than having an old camera body and using it constantly.

My advice is to get the camera body that fits into your budget and buy good glasses. Then go out and practice as much as possible.

May 19 13 08:59 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
afplcc
Posts: 5,971
Fairfax, Virginia, US


I'm a long time Nikon shooter.  Let me offer my take.

1.  Whatever you buy, just get the body.  Don't buy the kit lens.  It's worth saving up to get a professional (or near professional caliber) lens.  That means (as a baseline) probably spending at least $1,000 USD (and far more for the better zooms).  Buying with the kit lens will be a waste of money for you considering the kit lens you already have.

2.  I have a D7000.  Fine camera.  Some people have complained about the AF, not b/c it's "broken" or doesn't work but b/c they don't know how to use the AF on the camera.  They just pop in a battery and SD card, set to auto and start shooting and are convinced the camera is buggy b/c it focused on the foreground or the background or a side prop.  No, they didn't learn how to adjust the AF area, how to lock the AF and then recompose.  D7000 is big on menus (so you need to decide if that works for you).  Outstanding at very low light--best of your 3 options you're considering when it comes to ISO and noise.

3.  I had a D90 (it was stolen).  You keep getting recommendations for a D90 b/c it's a great "all-around" camera.  I'd argue that the D90 does nothing superbly but it does everything very well.  I know a number of wedding photographers where a D90 is their backup or second body.

4.  I've used a D300.  Outstanding camera.  Probably better at handling wear and tear or dealing with bad weather/dust than the D7000.  It's a much older camera than the D7000 (which is a pro for some people--b/c it's simpler, a con for others--b/c the D7000 has far more features).

Each of these 3 are very good bodies with lots of fans.  Which one is for you?  Get clear about what you want to shoot and what stuff matters the most to you--that will tell you which body fits your needs.  But be totally clear:  none of these is a bad body--there are thousands of serious shooters around the globe who would all swear by each of these bodies.

Ed
May 20 13 01:25 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Amul La La
Posts: 774
Plymouth, England, United Kingdom


If you had to guess what camera would you say I use//had ?.



I'll tell you if your right, I reckon you'd be pleasantly surprised!



what would it matter anyway ?.


I don't really care about equipment, I've had the same stuff, for almost 2years, (when I look back the whole excitement over equipment was vastly overrated, I have nothing against techies, I'm just not one, I grew out of that phase very quickly, it's also partly to do with my persona).


I capture with my mind, and shoot with my camera !
May 20 13 01:59 pm  Link  Quote 
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