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first12
Model
Big A-Larger Than Life
Posts: 33,400
The Woodlands, Texas, US


Tropical Photography wrote:

Stress I doubt but I know a gas passer here that has 16 weeks off a year.. Granted, he's running pretty much full on from the week after Thanksgiving until about Easter..

Okay well gassers have awesome lifestyle, hours, and pay lol.  And no call.   big_smile.  Even residents have it nice.  And the patients can't spit on you, cuss you out, or bite you once they get a nice cocktail of peace the fuck out...    big_smile

Jun 11 13 07:37 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Mad Hatter Imagery
Posts: 1,280
Buffalo, New York, US


MyrnaByrna Jen B wrote:

Are you hating on nurses?

I am a former lab tech and a current nurse and I cannot believe how EASY my lab tech job was compared to being a nurse. There is no comparison.

Different jobs. I think people don't really know what nurses do sometimes.

It took me 15+ years to get the degree and I worked as a tech and other minimum entry certificate positions while working towards that degree. They are totally different skill sets and totally different jobs. Maybe it was the nurse who recommended the doctor order some tests for that patient because it may be likely that there was something going on based on her observation and knowledge and interpretation of the patient's presentation.

I'm not hating on nurses as you put it. I just think a lab tech's education should get them more pay. Particularly if by ratio there are fewer of them. I don't know when you were a lab tech, but I've been told that practically only within the last 4 years or so have lab techs been a licensed profession with credientials that are to be taken seriously. My only point was that a lab tech with a bachelor's degree will get paid less than a nurse with an associate's.

Jun 11 13 08:26 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Jay Dezelic
Posts: 4,625
Seattle, Washington, US


Erin Holmes wrote:
Exactly. Some of my fashion/photography friends think I'm insane for continuing a degree in healthcare and should concentrate on photography. They're the crazy ones!

People are eventually willing to pay anything to live.

AOP Studios wrote:
Already predicted to be the next HUGE bubble like construction and 100's of layoffs.

The only bubble is on the administrative side.  Unless a high number of people suddenly change their diets, there is no shortage of sickness in the foreseeable future.  Chronic disease will continue to be on the rise.  Those in power know that needy people make better subjects. smile

Jun 11 13 08:53 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Erin Holmes
Posts: 6,330
Albuquerque, New Mexico, US


T A X I wrote:

I can validate that as a son of an emergency room nurse of 20+ years. I would never wish my daughter to become an ER nurse. As a kid I volunteered in the same ER as my mother and walked away with a boat-load of respect for the woman. An ER nurse is probably the extreme when discussing nursing but still, the experience was enough for me to know I didn't want to be in the medical field. I didn't want to witness anymore broken legs, car crash victims, volleyball-sized hernias, doctors pulling moths out of kids ears, spurting blood vessels, Psych-ward crazies, or anything else that prevented me from finishing my lunch.

The jobs might pay (overtime) well but I would compare the stress level with that of a Police Officer or combat vet. Many of them after years of wear down become alcoholics, smoke heavily or even worse commit suicide (may Mom lost 2 co-workers just last year, one to self-inflected death the other from a heart attack in her sleep). The hours they work are murderous (10-12 hr shifts 4 days straight) as well. Heck, my mom missed most of my teenaged years because she was either working or sleeping.

Fact is most of the jobs nursing and medical students are actually going to get will be in hospice care. You couldn't pay me enough money to swipe someone else's ass or clean up their vomit daily.

Much respect.

You get used to it. Now cleaning up dog shit? Fuck that, makes me gag.

Jun 11 13 10:46 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
misszara
Posts: 6,715
Sydney, New South Wales, Australia


Mad Hatter Imagery wrote:

Oh, what is your degree?

I completed my first degree in psychology, then studied ABA therapy and worked with children with autism, I also did dental nursing.
I originally wanted to study dentistry, but went with the Dr of Speech Pathology as I could specialise with autistic children smile I also do anatomy & physiology subjects on top of our basic anatomy smile

Jun 12 13 02:54 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Mad Hatter Imagery
Posts: 1,280
Buffalo, New York, US


misszara wrote:

I completed my first degree in psychology, then studied ABA therapy and worked with children with autism, I also did dental nursing.
I originally wanted to study dentistry, but went with the Dr of Speech Pathology as I could specialise with autistic children smile I also do anatomy & physiology subjects on top of our basic anatomy smile

Cool. My most recent degree would be my BA in psych. My previous 2 were in programming and business which have nothing so much to do with medicine as psych sometimes does.

Jun 12 13 09:11 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Merlinpix
Posts: 7,098
Farmingdale, New York, US


OK, 30+ years as an RN..always  been  employed, underpaid, poor  retirement prospects.....increasing  complex  tasking. Don't  get  me  wrong,  I love  working  with  people and  being a  nurse.  However, hospitals have taken  on a corporate model in the  past  10-15 years....do more  with  less, be thankful you  have a job attitude. They  treat  nurses  like an expendable, part  of  the  equation...motherfuckers..we are the  equation. A hospital without  nurses is a shabby  hotel  with  oxygen outlets.
Jun 13 13 01:00 am  Link  Quote 
Model
Big A-Larger Than Life
Posts: 33,400
The Woodlands, Texas, US


Merlinpix wrote:
OK, 30+ years as an RN..always  been  employed, underpaid, poor  retirement prospects.....increasing  complex  tasking. Don't  get  me  wrong,  I love  working  with  people and  being a  nurse.  However, hospitals have taken  on a corporate model in the  past  10-15 years....do more  with  less, be thankful you  have a job attitude. They  treat  nurses  like an expendable, part  of  the  equation...motherfuckers..we are the  equation. A hospital without  nurses is a shabby  hotel  with  oxygen outlets.

^^^ well said!!!!    lol

Jun 13 13 08:03 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Mad Hatter Imagery
Posts: 1,280
Buffalo, New York, US


Merlinpix wrote:
... A hospital without  nurses is a shabby  hotel  with  oxygen outlets.

Awesome. lol.

Jun 13 13 08:10 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
MB Jen B
Posts: 2,860
Clarksville, Tennessee, US


T A X I wrote:
... still, the experience was enough for me to know I didn't want to be in the medical field. I didn't want to witness anymore broken legs, car crash victims, volleyball-sized hernias, doctors pulling moths out of kids ears, spurting blood vessels, Psych-ward crazies, or anything else that prevented me from finishing my lunch.


Much respect.

Yup. A bunch of coworker nurses and I at one unit were swapping stories once and just concluded that, "You just can't make this stuff up!!" wink

Jen, respect back to nurses.

Jun 13 13 10:27 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
MB Jen B
Posts: 2,860
Clarksville, Tennessee, US


Mad Hatter Imagery wrote:

I'm not hating on nurses as you put it. I just think a lab tech's education should get them more pay. Particularly if by ratio there are fewer of them. I don't know when you were a lab tech, but I've been told that practically only within the last 4 years or so have lab techs been a licensed profession with credientials that are to be taken seriously. My only point was that a lab tech with a bachelor's degree will get paid less than a nurse with an associate's.

Hi,
It may be were you are located. I felt fully respected when I worked as a tech in several hospitals in Chicago. this was in the 90's. We were only certified then but, it was respected. Sorry you are having such a bad way. Might be the health care field in general as no one gets respect, not even nurses...or docs...

Jen

Jun 13 13 10:30 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
MB Jen B
Posts: 2,860
Clarksville, Tennessee, US


Big A-Larger Than Life wrote:
...
Go pull a typical ER/ICU/step down/telemetry/ psych schedule for one month and tell me how great it is and how much time or energy you have to spend the money you do make....

Big A, I like you more now! smile

Jen

Jun 13 13 10:33 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
MB Jen B
Posts: 2,860
Clarksville, Tennessee, US


Merlinpix wrote:
OK, 30+ years as an RN..always  been  employed, underpaid, poor  retirement prospects.....increasing  complex  tasking. Don't  get  me  wrong,  I love  working  with  people and  being a  nurse.  However, hospitals have taken  on a corporate model in the  past  10-15 years....do more  with  less, be thankful you  have a job attitude. They  treat  nurses  like an expendable, part  of  the  equation...motherfuckers..we are the  equation. A hospital without  nurses is a shabby  hotel  with  oxygen outlets.

I've thought for years that nurses should bill insurance directly and NOT be "employees" of the hospitals.

It isn't a new concept and has been talked about but, just as hospitals try to "woo" docs in and docs bill insurances I think nurses should do the same. "quit" the hourly worker and "employee" mentality. Health care isn't a factory, nurses are professionals and well, I am against "hourly" wages and think billing ability would change things.

Rant over,
Jen

Jun 13 13 10:39 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
misszara
Posts: 6,715
Sydney, New South Wales, Australia


Mad Hatter Imagery wrote:

Cool. My most recent degree would be my BA in psych. My previous 2 were in programming and business which have nothing so much to do with medicine as psych sometimes does.

Psychology is insane! haha. Did you enjoy it? Will you use it? I know a lot of people (including me) only did psychology as an undergraduate bachelor's degree to get into post-grad medical courses smile
But it is very interesting!

Jun 13 13 11:38 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Jules NYC
Posts: 15,626
New York, New York, US


A woman that I am working with is about to be married, wants a baby and snubbing the idea of taking a 70k nursing job.

No, selfishly pursue music and have your kid struggle with all of their necessities because you want to make quick $ touring!

Guess that justifies that music degree while I have to pay 40k back for my non-music education as well.

I fucking despise people that cry poor then have a baby.
Great choice for your kid!
Jun 14 13 06:42 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Mad Hatter Imagery
Posts: 1,280
Buffalo, New York, US


misszara wrote:

Psychology is insane! haha. Did you enjoy it? Will you use it? I know a lot of people (including me) only did psychology as an undergraduate bachelor's degree to get into post-grad medical courses smile
But it is very interesting!

There is a long list of common reasons people become psych majors.

a). They want to figure out what's wrong with themselves.
b). They want to figure other people out.
c). They want to be able to counsel other people effectively.
d). They find the topic interesting and don't know what else to major in.
e). In general the degree can be applied to many things in counseling, human resources, industrial product psych research, etc.

I did enjoy learning the vast topics in psychology, but I don't think I've found a use for it directly. It is often a hard sell as a specialty without graduate course work. You can be a nurse with a 2 year degree and earn $60k/yr, or get a doctorate in psychology which could take 9 years and maybe make $50k/yr. lol. I wasn't interested enough to make it a profession. I just felt it enriched my life to better understand why people do the things they do.

Jun 14 13 05:31 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
MB Jen B
Posts: 2,860
Clarksville, Tennessee, US


Mad Hatter Imagery wrote:

There is a long list of common reasons people become psych majors.

a). They want to figure out what's wrong with themselves.
b). They want to figure other people out.
c). They want to be able to counsel other people effectively.
d). They find the topic interesting and don't know what else to major in.
e). In general the degree can be applied to many things in counseling, human resources, industrial product psych research, etc.

I did enjoy learning the vast topics in psychology, but I don't think I've found a use for it directly. It is often a hard sell as a specialty without graduate course work. You can be a nurse with a 2 year degree and earn $60k/yr, or get a doctorate in psychology which could take 9 years and maybe make $50k/yr. lol. I wasn't interested enough to make it a profession. I just felt it enriched my life to better understand why people do the things they do.

smile My undergrad minor was Psych. Hey, I never replied to your post saying you weren't hating on nurses. Sorry about that. Message received, and I see.
Jen
p.s. My entry to nursing degree was a Masters, not an associates 2 year degree. I know, there are associate degrees that allow you to sit for the RN license but, not every RN has the same training, (on the job or in the books.) Its such a vague name, "nurse."

Jun 14 13 10:23 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Steve Rh
Posts: 57
Orlando, Florida, US


MyrnaByrna Jen B wrote:

I've thought for years that nurses should bill insurance directly and NOT be "employees" of the hospitals.

It isn't a new concept and has been talked about but, just as hospitals try to "woo" docs in and docs bill insurances I think nurses should do the same. "quit" the hourly worker and "employee" mentality. Health care isn't a factory, nurses are professionals and well, I am against "hourly" wages and think billing ability would change things.

Rant over,
Jen

The key piece of the picture that you are missing is that all patients in a private hospital have either private insurance or Medicare/Medicaid. With these providers, there are set rates on what can be charged by the hospital for care. Doctors and hospitals try and charge above the set rates, but they rarely get above set rates. The hospital bills the insurance companies and Medicare/Medicade for the care provided. The doctor’s do not submit bills to the insurance companies or Medicare/Medicade so your concept does not work.

To stay below the set rates, large private hospitals have gone to using a bunch of CNA’s with a couple of RN’s and Nurse Practitioner’s monitoring the CNA’s. The large private hospitals have also gone to outside management companies that manage the hospital. All of the hospital employees from the janitor to the nurses work for the management company, not the hospital. If the hospital decides to change management companies, the staff loses their jobs.

...FYI, I am talking about this area. Your neck of the woods may be different.

Jun 15 13 09:43 am  Link  Quote 
Model
MB Jen B
Posts: 2,860
Clarksville, Tennessee, US


Steve Rh wrote:
The key piece of the picture that you are missing is that all patients in a private hospital have either private insurance or Medicare/Medicaid. With these providers, there are set rates on what can be charged by the hospital for care. Doctors and hospitals try and charge above the set rates, but they rarely get above set rates. The hospital bills the insurance companies and Medicare/Medicade for the care provided. The doctor’s do not submit bills to the insurance companies or Medicare/Medicade so your concept does not work.

To stay below the set rates, large private hospitals have gone to using a bunch of CNA’s with a couple of RN’s and Nurse Practitioner’s monitoring the CNA’s. The large private hospitals have also gone to outside management companies that manage the hospital. All of the hospital employees from the janitor to the nurses work for the management company, not the hospital. If the hospital decides to change management companies, the staff loses their jobs.

...FYI, I am talking about this area. Your neck of the woods may be different.

Oh, this isn't new. When I was a cna at a major metropolitan hospital in Chicago on an intense unit I had 20 patients and two nurses, (who had ten each...)
Jen
edit:
and at that times they'd already upgraded CNAs to doing Licensed practical nurses basic clinical skills too...They called us "techs" but, we were similar to Practical/Vocational nurses but didn't do anything with meds.

Jun 15 13 03:48 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Sabine Luise
Posts: 890
Boston, Massachusetts, US


I get paid well, IMO. So, it depends on what Specialty of nursing you are in, your experience level, and location. Plus, I actually like my job.

There seem to be many jobs in healthcare when you look in the newspaper or online, but it isn't what it seems. These days, New Grads seem to complain they can't find work. Some get jobs right before they graduate, which others have to wait years. Experienced nurses can't find work because the hospitals are hiring New Grads to save money from having to pay a well experienced nurse. Nurses get paid by years experience, not by the time you start working in a facility. It is a catch 22 really. Now that hospitals are getting paid incentives by scores on patient surveys they are even cutting out more budgets for staff when they lose out on that incentive. Just saying... I could go on all day about the politics.
Jun 18 13 08:44 pm  Link  Quote 
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