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Photographer
Looknsee Photography
Posts: 21,175
Portland, Oregon, US


Jun 14 13 10:12 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Lohkee
Posts: 12,291
Maricopa, Arizona, US


Yeah, except they are all not very good -

http://memeburn.com/2011/07/microsoft-a … sdropping/
Jun 14 13 10:57 am  Link  Quote 
Model
Jules NYC
Posts: 16,096
New York, New York, US


If there was a time machine, I'd get in it immediately where these issues would never be a problem.
Jun 14 13 12:24 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
rfordphotos
Posts: 4,709
Antioch, California, US


Jules NYC wrote:
If there was a time machine, I'd get in it immediately where these issues would never be a problem.

Good plan Jules smile

Sad thing is, you most likely would just be trading issues.

People have been prying into each other business since the dawn of time, looking for some advantage over each other.

When I was a kid, we had "party line" phones-where several families shared the same line---You picked up the phone to see if it was in use.... or to listen in on your neighbor. You learned not to say anything "sensitive".

Opening snail mail was just one way to snoop.

As technology advances, we seem to always be at least one step behind in protecting our privacy...

There are ways to become invisible. You can just drop out and live in the woods, but most of us dont  want to do that....

Jun 14 13 01:36 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Looknsee Photography
Posts: 21,175
Portland, Oregon, US


I've admitted that I'm an Internet pioneer.  As a graduate computer science student in the early 1970s, we students used to play semi-harmless pranks on each other.  Because of that activity (and others that were going on at the time), we kinda created the first...
...  Computer security,
...  Network security,
...  Redundancy planning,
...  Backup & Restore planning, and
...  The electronic bulletin board (which was the predecessor to these forums).

In any case, I have always been overly protective of my privacy & on-line security.  Yes, I know I could do better, but some things I've done...

...  I don't have a cell phone.
...  I back up to four different places.
...  I don't use my real name when signing up for stuff.
...  I have a special credit card (with a low limit) for online purchases.
...  My web site's WHOIS refers to my web host, not me.
...  I don't use social networking -- it scares me,
...  I use call screening,
...  And other things.

I'm not as protected as I'd like to be, but I think I'm more protected than most.
Jun 14 13 02:52 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Virtual Studio
Posts: 5,619
Toronto, Ontario, Canada


Looknsee Photography wrote:
I've admitted that I'm an Internet pioneer.  As a graduate computer science student in the early 1970s, we students used to play semi-harmless pranks on each other.  Because of that activity (and others that were going on at the time), we kinda created the first...
...  Computer security,
...  Network security,
...  Redundancy planning,
...  Backup & Restore planning, and
...  The electronic bulletin board (which was the predecessor to these forums).

In any case, I have always been overly protective of my privacy & on-line security.  Yes, I know I could do better, but some things I've done...

...  I don't have a cell phone.
...  I back up to four different places.
...  I don't use my real name when signing up for stuff.
...  I have a special credit card (with a low limit) for online purchases.
...  My web site's WHOIS refers to my web host, not me.
...  I don't use social networking -- it scares me,
...  I use call screening,
...  And other things.

I'm not as protected as I'd like to be, but I think I'm more protected than most.

>>>...  I don't use social networking -- it scares me,

He says on a social networking web site.

When did you last check your tinfoil hat for holes? smile

Jun 14 13 02:56 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Bob Helm Photography
Posts: 18,176
Cherry Hill, New Jersey, US


Simple..do not use a computer or telephone.
Or at least use a computer not connected to anything other than a power outlet for any data you do not want to share.
Jun 14 13 03:48 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
matt-h2
Posts: 521
Oakland, California, US


Lohkee wrote:
Yeah, except they are all not very good -

http://memeburn.com/2011/07/microsoft-a … sdropping/

Did you go to OP's link? None of it has to do with Skype or M$.
I'm not sure there is much that is truly beyond NSA's routine vacuuming of data, but the link will prevent or discourage much casual data theft.

Jun 14 13 04:21 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Lohkee
Posts: 12,291
Maricopa, Arizona, US


matt-h2 wrote:

Did you go to OP's link? None of it has to do with Skype or M$.
I'm not sure there is much that is truly beyond NSA's routine vacuuming of data, but the link will prevent or discourage much casual data theft.

From the article - LONDON (AP) — Phone call logs, credit card records, emails, Skype chats, Facebook message, and more: The precise nature of the NSA's sweeping surveillance apparatus has yet to be confirmed.

Jun 14 13 07:12 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
255 West
Posts: 6,468
New York, New York, US


Nothing you can do, unless you go completely off grid.

George Bush, and most delusional Americans, think we are too strong to be affected by terrorist -- we've swallowed the fear hook, line, and sinker -- or we wouldn't accept the government intrusion.
Jun 14 13 07:20 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Instinct Images
Posts: 22,507
San Diego, California, US


255 West wrote:
Nothing you can do, unless you go completely off grid.

George Bush, and most delusional Americans, think we are too strong to be affected by terrorist -- we've swallowed the fear hook, line, and sinker -- or we wouldn't accept the government intrusion.

The intrusion started long before Bush or 9/11. I have personal first-hand knowledge of how some of the internet snooping started because I worked for one of the major internet equipment manufacturers in 2000 when it was in the works and the tap was developed.

Jun 14 13 10:01 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Vintagevista
Posts: 10,861
Sun City, California, US


https://sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-frc1/1002960_682373798458743_1694330522_n.jpg
Jun 14 13 10:15 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Salater Photography
Posts: 7
Los Angeles, California, US


There are ways to keep your data safe.

If you have files on your computer you want to keep private, you can encrypt them and it is extremely difficult for anyone else without the password to access. In fact, to date, there is not one single case of it being cracked or hacked by any law enforcement agency in the world. They have had to testify in court that they were unable to crack the encryption. It is TrueCrypt. I'm not spamming them because it's free. You download the program and you can encrypt an entire external drive or files on your main drive and it has not been cracked or hacked yet.  I've used TrueCrypt for years and love it.

For online activity, you can use a virtual privacy network or VPN, a good list of them are here:

http://torrentfreak.com/vpn-services-th … on-130302/

(TOR is too slow, I never use it)

The VPN isn't foolproof but then again, you're not Osama bin Laden. What I mean by that is that your security should match the level of whoever is looking for you. If you're just some guy downloading pirated movies or hiding your porn collection from your wife, retail proxies and encryption services are fine for that level. But if you're some terrorist or whatever, you have to watch every single thing: throw away cell phones, disguises, facial recognition, total drive encryption, etc.

A good snoop will probably find you. Example: a guy had total security on his computer, had the best proxies, VPN's, encrypted his entire hard drive, thought he was safe. The snoop waited until he left, picked the guy's front door lock, installed a wireless mini camera and pointed it at the guy's computer and keyboard, parked across the street, and recorded everything the guy did.

(that was me back in the days I was a private investigator for Pinkerton in Chicago)

There's always a way.
Jun 15 13 07:46 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Lohkee
Posts: 12,291
Maricopa, Arizona, US


Salater Photography wrote:
There's always a way.

Chuckles. There sure is (25 years IT investigator for IRS).

Jun 15 13 07:57 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Cherrystone
Posts: 36,421
Columbus, Ohio, US


Jules NYC wrote:
If there was a time machine, I'd get in it immediately where these issues would never be a problem.

Like 1988? smile

Jun 15 13 08:42 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Light Writer
Posts: 18,387
Oakland, California, US


Jules NYC wrote:
If there was a time machine, I'd get in it immediately where these issues would never be a problem.

Did such a time ever exist?

Jun 15 13 08:43 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
rp_photo
Posts: 42,490
Houston, Texas, US


Rumor has it that the NSA guys have been spending their time in a darkened room with plenty of Vaseline reviewing my Internet traffic smile
Jun 15 13 08:45 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
rp_photo
Posts: 42,490
Houston, Texas, US


Looknsee Photography wrote:
I'm not as protected as I'd like to be, but I think I'm more protected than most.

Yes, but at the cost of giving up some modern innovations.

Jun 15 13 08:50 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Lohkee
Posts: 12,291
Maricopa, Arizona, US


rp_photo wrote:
Yes, but at the cost of giving up some modern innovations.

Not to mention sanity. Products like TrueCrypt are very very good when it comes to protecting data against your average burglar (and highly recommended). Against a state actor with resources? Worthless.

There is however a bullet-proof solution. Don't use technology for illegal purposes. That way, the worst you will be facing is the death penalty for boring the feds to death. lol

Jun 15 13 10:57 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Patrick Walberg
Posts: 42,577
Salinas, California, US


rp_photo wrote:
Rumor has it that the NSA guys have been spending their time in a darkened room with plenty of Vaseline reviewing my Internet traffic smile

No wonder I've got so many "views" on certain images!  lol

Jun 15 13 11:00 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Salater Photography
Posts: 7
Los Angeles, California, US


Lohkee wrote:

Chuckles. There sure is (25 years IT investigator for IRS).

Oh my gosh, I can only imagine what you know and what you did. Love to sit down and have a few beers with you.

Jun 15 13 10:31 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Michael Bots
Posts: 5,688
Kingston, Ontario, Canada


Windows NSA key      --- google it


Not a surprise to anyone who did IT support.


How NSA access was built into Windows
http://www.heise.de/tp/artikel/5/5263/1.html
"04.09.1999
Careless mistake reveals subversion of Windows by NSA."


Crypto expert: Microsoft products leave door open to NSA
http://www.cnn.com/TECH/computing/9909/03/windows.nsa/
September 3, 1999


Microsoft Stonewalls NSA_key Questions - Cryptome
http://cryptome.org/nsakey-ms-dc.htm


Facebook got 10,000 requests for data from NSA in just six months (and Microsoft received 7,000 orders)
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article … rders.html


Revealed: Yahoo FOUGHT against NSA's warrantless spying program but lost and was forced by secret court to join PRISM
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article … PRISM.html


Jailed Qwest CEO claimed that NSA retaliated because he wouldn’t participate in spy program
http://dailycaller.com/2013/06/13/jaile … y-program/


Google versus the NSA, choice versus trust
http://www.zdnet.com/google-versus-the- … 000016835/


G20 surveillance: why was Turkey targeted?
http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013/ju … geted-gchq

"Being a Nato ally seems to offer little protection against covert monitoring. The only boundary GCHQ appears to recognise is membership of Five Eyes, the tight coalition of western English-speaking states that share their signals intelligence: the US, UK, Canada, Australia and New Zealand. When it comes to eavesdropping on a national of a "second party", as Five Eyes members are called, that government has to be informed.

Anyone outside that select group is potentially fair game. In fact, the question the Turkish G20 document leaves unanswered is: if GCHQ was actively contemplating wiretaps on mid-level treasury officials in the hope of capturing their thoughts on the regulatory architecture of global finance, who would it not spy on?"
Jun 16 13 03:45 pm  Link  Quote 
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