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Forums > Model Colloquy > Question for Models; Do you care the camera? Search   Reply
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Photographer
Patrick Walberg
Posts: 42,430
Salinas, California, US


There is a thread about some of the great images that some photographers are getting from their iPhones http://www.modelmayhem.com/po.php?thread_id=894676

This begs the question; Do you care what kind of camera a photographer shoots with?   Would you be alright with a photographer using an iPhone?

If it's cool with models, perhaps I should put away the DSLR's and start using the iPhone exclusively?
Jun 15 13 11:21 am  Link  Quote 
Model
Elizabeta Rosandic
Posts: 939
Santa Fe, New Mexico, US


I knew a photographer who did a series of *fantastic* street photos with an iphone.

I love serious (I use that term liberally- I'm referring to anyone who has a legitimate artistic vision and isn't just photographing his personal fap material) photographers who experiment with medium. It's just more experience that I can have under my belt as a model. For instance, posing for film photography is a lot different than posing for digital photography. But, because I have posed for film before, the next photog who shoots film with me won't have to teach me how to model for it, saving us both a lot of time.
Jun 15 13 11:27 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
J O H N A L L A N
Posts: 9,734
Santa Ana, California, US


Elizabeta Rosandic wrote:
For instance, posing for film photography is a lot different than posing for digital photography. But, because I have posed for film before, the next photog who shoots film with me won't have to teach me how to model for it, saving us both a lot of time.

Interesting comment. How so?

Jun 15 13 11:37 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
nyk fury
Posts: 2,900
Port Townsend, Washington, US


Patrick Walberg wrote:
If it's cool with models, perhaps I should put away the DSLR's and start using the iPhone exclusively?

i carry 3 cameras: DSLR, compact, iphone. the latter 2 fit in one pocket.

Jun 15 13 11:39 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
dave phoenix
Posts: 1,257
Phoenix, Arizona, US


Patrick Walberg wrote:
If it's cool with models, perhaps I should put away the DSLR's and start using the iPhone exclusively?

If you have no interested in shooting with a DSLR anymore, then yes - you should put it down.

Jun 15 13 11:53 am  Link  Quote 
Model
Natasha Laws Mick
Posts: 64
Carbondale, Illinois, US


I don't believe it has anything to do with the camera a photographer is using whatsoever.
Jun 15 13 11:56 am  Link  Quote 
Model
Laura UnBound
Posts: 26,985
Toronto, Ontario, Canada


If your portfolio is only built with a dslr and you show up to our shoot with just a phone, yes I'll be upset.

If the part of your portfolio I loved and wanted to shoot with you was your wet plate photography and you only show up with a dslr, yes I'll be upset.

If I loved your iPhone series but you only want to shoot film, yes I'll be upset.



If I tell you I love the photos you took with your iPhone and you show up to our shoot with an iPhone, no, I won't be upset.



Any time that I book a trade shoot with someone based on what they're showing in their portfolio, and I come to find out they're trying to use me as a guinea pig for something completely different, I'm upset, be it the camera or the content or the post work. I didnt realize I actually had to say "I'd like to shoot with you for ONLY what you CURRENTLY showcase in your portfolio", I thought that was sort of self-evident, but apparently not.

As long as you're honest about what you're shooting and its something the model actually wants to shoot, doesn't matter if you're using a phone, a dslr, or a rock.
Jun 15 13 11:57 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
KonstantKarma
Posts: 2,513
Hickory, North Carolina, US


Post hidden on Jun 15, 2013 01:25 pm
Reason: off-topic
Comments:
Please discuss the topic at hand if you wish to participate in an industry forum
Jun 15 13 12:02 pm  Link 
Model
Danielle Reid
Posts: 3,779
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, US


I don't care what camera you use as long as they come out looking better than selfies that I can take on my own time.

What bugs me is when photographers message me and tell me what type of camera they use. As if having an expensive camera is going to make me want to pay you.

I don't know much about cameras, but like most people, I know what looks good to ME. Shoot me with a toy camera, as long as I look professional in the returned photos I'm good.
Jun 15 13 12:10 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
PhotographybyT
Posts: 7,596
Monterey, California, US


Elizabeta Rosandic wrote:
For instance, posing for film photography is a lot different than posing for digital photography. But, because I have posed for film before, the next photog who shoots film with me won't have to teach me how to model for it, saving us both a lot of time.
J O H N  A L L A N wrote:
Interesting comment. How so?

I'm curious as well.

Jun 15 13 12:14 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
DOUGLASFOTOS
Posts: 7,972
Los Angeles, California, US


PhotographybyT wrote:

Elizabeta Rosandic wrote:
For instance, posing for film photography is a lot different than posing for digital photography. But, because I have posed for film before, the next photog who shoots film with me won't have to teach me how to model for it, saving us both a lot of time.

I'm curious as well.

I Too...am Curious.

Jun 15 13 12:17 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
LA StarShooter
Posts: 1,753
Los Angeles, California, US


DOUGLASFOTOS wrote:

I Too...am Curious.

Extremely Curious.

Jun 15 13 12:25 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
salvatori.
Posts: 3,692
State College, Pennsylvania, US


Elizabeta Rosandic wrote:
For instance, posing for film photography is a lot different than posing for digital photography.

I'm not speaking for the model, but I see that a lot of people are curious what she means by this. I am curious as well.

I will say that, as a person who shoots films exclusively (save for one session I did this past week), is that experienced models tend to like film shots, as they are different than what they usually have in their portfolios.

I have encountered several noobie-models that won't do a tf* session with me because I am up front with them concerning the fewer pics they are going to get, and they are often times looking for someone to shoot hundreds of pics so they can receive more shots.

Jun 15 13 12:28 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Shandra Stark
Posts: 13,588
Los Angeles, California, US


J O H N  A L L A N wrote:
Interesting comment. How so?

Film= much, much, much different, for the model.

Working with a film photographer is not very dissimilar from sitting for a painter (sitting super, super still for potentially a long period of time), but requires even a bit more, since everything needs to be so unbelievably precise, and in a painting, a small movement doesn't matter.

Every time I work for a film photographer, I feel honored, because it feels like you have to REALLY have a certain skill set to move and sit so precisely- not for beginner models.

I mean, obviously people who shoot film do shoot everyday people who've never modeled, but if they want something specific...they need to/should go with a pro.

Jun 15 13 12:30 pm  Link  Quote 
Artist/Painter
3068875
Posts: 881
Los Angeles, California, US


Patrick Walberg wrote:
There is a thread about some of the great images that some photographers are getting from their iPhones http://www.modelmayhem.com/po.php?thread_id=894676

This begs the question; Do you care what kind of camera a photographer shoots with?   Would you be alright with a photographer using an iPhone?

If it's cool with models, perhaps I should put away the DSLR's and start using the iPhone exclusively?

This raises the question: can you get the results you want with an iPhone?

Jun 15 13 12:43 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Ken Warren Photography
Posts: 575
GLENMOORE, Pennsylvania, US


Shandra Stark wrote:
Film= much, much, much different.

I don't really agree with this. I shot film for 25 years before I switched to digital. When I made the switch, not a lot changed (except that my film processing, and printing costs went down a bit:) ). I shoot about the same number of frames with a model as I always did, I use the same types of equipment and locations, I do some post-processing to produce the desired results, just like always (not much is usually required).

Jun 15 13 12:47 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
K I C K H A M
Posts: 14,489
Los Angeles, California, US


I don't mind what camera is used so long as I can get the results I need.

However, the results I need include hi-rez images to use for my agency book, so that probably rules out iphones.
Jun 15 13 12:47 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Select Models
Posts: 35,300
Upland, California, US


Dude... honestly... just how much confidence do you think your model will have in you when you're shooting images of her with a phone?... roll   It doesnt' have the ability to sync to professional lights... you can't control depth of field or shutterspeed... and I'm quite sure the noise will be INSANE on any kind of enlargement... wink
Jun 15 13 12:58 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
LA StarShooter
Posts: 1,753
Los Angeles, California, US


Shandra Stark wrote:

Film= much, much, much different.

Working with a film photographer is not very dissimilar from sitting for a painter (sitting super, super still for potentially a long period of time), but requires even a bit more, since everything needs to be so unbelievably precise, and in a painting, a small movement doesn't matter.

Every time I work for a film photographer, I feel honored, because it feels like you have to REALLY have a certain skill set to move and sit so precisely- not for beginner models.

I mean, obviously people who shoot film do shoot everyday people who've never modeled, but if they want something specific...they need to/should go with a pro.

Cindy Crawford was shot on a film for her high school newspaper. She looked great and she did continue to look great for quite a few years in the sense of booking major campaigns. For those photographers who have never shot on film it can be more of a test if they are crossing over from digital, but for models? A photographer can shoot a fast burst of film, it just the cost adds up to a large amount of money. If the model has the look and the photographer has the skill, film isn't that different or difficult for a model from digital. And Cindy Crawford looked good in her first photoshoot for her high school newspaper. On film.

Jun 15 13 01:05 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Shandra Stark
Posts: 13,588
Los Angeles, California, US


LA StarShooter wrote:
Cindy Crawford was shot on a film for her high school newspaper. She looked great and she did continue to look great for quite a few years in the sense of booking major campaigns. For those photographers who have never shot on film it can be more of a test if they are crossing over from digital, but for models? A photographer can shoot a fast burst of film, it just the cost adds up to a large amount of money. If the model has the look and the photographer has the skill, film isn't that different or difficult for a model from digital. And Cindy Crawford looked good in her first photoshoot for her high school newspaper. On film.

Cindy Crawford always looks good.  Totally null.

I never said an image on film will magically make a model look like shit, and that digital is in any way better than film.

As an art model, who has been doing this just about every day for the better part of a decade, I can feel a difference.  I can't just randomly move through dozens of poses rapid-fire.

Working with someone who is spending the money to shoot film, and who only has a few precious shots who needs you to do everything "just so" is different than working with someone with endless memory cards.

Have you modeled before?

Jun 15 13 01:19 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Shandra Stark
Posts: 13,588
Los Angeles, California, US


Ken Warren Photography wrote:

I don't really agree with this. I shot film for 25 years before I switched to digital. When I made the switch, not a lot changed (except that my film processing, and printing costs went down a bit:) ). I shoot about the same number of frames with a model as I always did, I use the same types of equipment and locations, I do some post-processing to produce the desired results, just like always (not much is usually required).

Everyone's process is different.

The people I work with shoot about 12 images, total, and could not possibly have a wiggly, squirmy, new model.

I am not saying that shooting film is drastically different.  I'm saying that being a model for someone working with film is different.  This is the modeling forum, after all.

Jun 15 13 01:23 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Dark Shadows
Posts: 2,269
Miami, Florida, US


I've been doing about one photoshoot a week with a phone just for fun. No one has complained or anything.
Jun 15 13 01:25 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
J O H N A L L A N
Posts: 9,734
Santa Ana, California, US


Shandra Stark wrote:
Film= much, much, much different.

Working with a film photographer is not very dissimilar from sitting for a painter (sitting super, super still for potentially a long period of time), but requires even a bit more, since everything needs to be so unbelievably precise, and in a painting, a small movement doesn't matter.

Every time I work for a film photographer, I feel honored, because it feels like you have to REALLY have a certain skill set to move and sit so precisely- not for beginner models.

I mean, obviously people who shoot film do shoot everyday people who've never modeled, but if they want something specific...they need to/should go with a pro.

Oh - maybe you're thinking about large format film (8x10).
I shot transparency film (35mm and some MF) for like 8 years and now digital. In terms of model movement / model interaction / anything the model needs to be concerned about, there's not really much difference.

Jun 15 13 01:25 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
K I C K H A M
Posts: 14,489
Los Angeles, California, US


Shandra Stark wrote:

Everyone's process is different.

The people I work with shoot about 12 images, total, and could not possibly have a wiggly, squirmy, new model.

I am not saying that shooting film is drastically different.  I'm saying that being a model for someone working with film is different.  This is the modeling forum, after all.

I agree to an extent, but I know a few photographers that used to shoot film that still shoot the same-- very slowly, very few frames. It makes me process a little slower, but not to a huge degree.

Jun 15 13 01:30 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Shandra Stark
Posts: 13,588
Los Angeles, California, US


J O H N  A L L A N wrote:

Oh - maybe you're thinking about large format film (8x10).

Yep!

Jun 15 13 01:45 pm  Link  Quote 
Clothing Designer
GRMACK
Posts: 1,624
Bakersfield, California, US


There is one model who put into her profile: "If you show up with some Instamatic or Polaroid, she would bitch-slap you.  Stab you.  And probably find some nearby gutter drain to shove your rotting carcass into."  I thought it funny and wondered what led her to that.  Never worked with her though. Scared me off I guess.

I agree somewhat on the film thing, especially when one works in some larger format like 4x5 or 8x10.  Takes a heck of a long time to set up over a smaller 35mm or digital where you can fire off a barrage of frames, or sit around and view them tethered too.  Even the old Hass'y guys who shot weddings with only 3 rolls of 120 film had to work a lot more for their shots too.  Much more planning involved, or "previsualization" aka the Minor White and Ansel Adams era.  Firing the shutter once back then cost a lot more money to do.  Can't imagine trying to shoot Playboy spread with an 8x10 film and 40 flash heads both - or even old "flash bulbs."

It's a lot easier to "Get a lucky shot" in digital too.
Jun 15 13 01:47 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Elizabeta Rosandic
Posts: 939
Santa Fe, New Mexico, US


Shandra Stark wrote:

Film= much, much, much different, for the model.

Working with a film photographer is not very dissimilar from sitting for a painter (sitting super, super still for potentially a long period of time), but requires even a bit more, since everything needs to be so unbelievably precise, and in a painting, a small movement doesn't matter.

Every time I work for a film photographer, I feel honored, because it feels like you have to REALLY have a certain skill set to move and sit so precisely- not for beginner models.

I mean, obviously people who shoot film do shoot everyday people who've never modeled, but if they want something specific...they need to/should go with a pro.

This.

Jun 15 13 02:32 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Dan Dozer
Posts: 538
La Quinta, California, US


Shandra Stark wrote:

Film= much, much, much different, for the model.

Working with a film photographer is not very dissimilar from sitting for a painter (sitting super, super still for potentially a long period of time), but requires even a bit more, since everything needs to be so unbelievably precise, and in a painting, a small movement doesn't matter.

Every time I work for a film photographer, I feel honored, because it feels like you have to REALLY have a certain skill set to move and sit so precisely- not for beginner models.

I mean, obviously people who shoot film do shoot everyday people who've never modeled, but if they want something specific...they need to/should go with a pro.

I'm glad that at least a few people understand this.  Thanks for explaining it this way.

Jun 15 13 02:41 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
MelissaAnn
Posts: 3,819
Seattle, Washington, US


The camera has to be HUGE, or really tiny.  I refuse to compromise & shoot with people who own medium-sized cameras.
Jun 15 13 05:18 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Risen Phoenix Photo
Posts: 1,152
Minneapolis, Minnesota, US


PhotographybyT wrote:

Elizabeta Rosandic wrote:
For instance, posing for film photography is a lot different than posing for digital photography. But, because I have posed for film before, the next photog who shoots film with me won't have to teach me how to model for it, saving us both a lot of
Jun 15 13 05:33 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
PhotographybyT
Posts: 7,596
Monterey, California, US


MelissaAnn  wrote:
The camera has to be HUGE, or really tiny.  I refuse to compromise & shoot with people who own medium-sized cameras.

Is this huge enough?? tongue

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-Dk78LJ6CF0s/UAK-CyiXy9I/AAAAAAAAEU8/GtM1xQVk2Og/s1600/Huge+camera.jpg

Jun 15 13 05:33 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Risen Phoenix Photo
Posts: 1,152
Minneapolis, Minnesota, US


Oh ok i get it now. however  I spend equal time setting up my shot and exposure prior to the snap of the shutter. In 3 hours I shoot about 200 images and I did about the same with my 35 mm film camera in the old days. I can understand wet plate and large format cameras require more patience from all involved.
Jun 15 13 05:37 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Michelle Genevieve
Posts: 928
Austin, Texas, US


To answer the question - No, I care not what the photographer captures an image with as long as he can use the tools he or she chooses to create the image that's inside his or her head. 

THAT'S the thing that has to sell me.  If the photog lacks creative vision no amount of high end gear will make a bit of difference to me.  But when the creative juices are flowing I feed off that and it brings even better performance from me.

Not too long ago a photographer asked me if I wanted to work with him (answer = Yes) and then he added that he wanted to do some iPhone stuff.  Short discussion followed and before I knew it I was really excited about the idea.  Scheduling issues prevented the shoot from happening but I am dying to give it a go now that my curiosity's been piqued!
Jun 15 13 05:42 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
MelissaAnn
Posts: 3,819
Seattle, Washington, US


PhotographybyT wrote:
Is this huge enough?? tongue

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-Dk78LJ6CF0s/UAK-CyiXy9I/AAAAAAAAEU8/GtM1xQVk2Og/s1600/Huge+camera.jpg

oh yeah....

Jun 15 13 05:42 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
GER Photography
Posts: 7,496
Imperial, California, US


The subject and how it's presented in a photograph is what's important. The camera no mater the type or brand is simply the tool that records what the photographer sees.
Jun 15 13 05:48 pm  Link  Quote 
guide forum
Photographer
Giacomo Cirrincioni
Posts: 20,904
New York, New York, US


I shoot all formats both film and digital, but for my personal work it's all medium and large format film with a HEAVY focus on LF (4x5 and 8x10).

It's difficult to find models that work well with that medium and I have found the best are ones I have a pre-existing relationship with and who already have a sense of what goes into it.

I rarely shoot more than six frames when I do those portraits and, if I were to be honest, at least four of those are either just insurance, or to make the model feel better (some think they've done something wrong if you're one and done). 

It's nice to know that there are some models who actually appreciate the medium.
Jun 15 13 05:51 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Jolly Rauncher
Posts: 1,515
Seattle, Washington, US


If I've seen photos they've taken on an iPhone (or similar phone) and it's really cool, then no I don't mind. I've seen some pretty cool shots caught on one of those so I know it can be done.
However if I show up for a shoot thinking it's going to be a certain way, and then said photographer just whips out a phone, not so much.
Jun 15 13 06:02 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
T-D-L
Posts: 10,110
Los Angeles, California, US


I recently sold my DSLR and switched to a mirrorless camera.  For those that don't  know, it's a tiny thing, not much bigger than the point & shoots.  I have been waiting for the day a model would have that surprised "Ummm, where's your real camera" look when I pull it out the bag, but none have cared one way or the other.  The few times I've brought it up they were like "Well, I assume your book was shot with that, so why should it matter?" much to my surprise.  I've come to realize that as long as the work you display is strong no one will second guess your judgement or equipment.  I remember when one photographer (popular guy on here) was shooting with just his iPhone....no complaints there either from what I saw.
Jun 15 13 06:12 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Yugoboy
Posts: 77
Rochester, New York, US


Many responses here.  I kind of understand the appeal of the iPhone.  My wife's got one, and the pix generally come out decent.

One major reason I would never do that is one of the reasons I shoot with a dSLR (and a film SLR before that) - being an anal retentive control freak about the settings.

I want to be able to change my f-stop at will, or the shutter speed to achieve different effects.  I want to be able to do optical telephoto and not just a digital zoom.  Some effects are just hard (if not impossible) to do with an iPhone (or other automatic pocket camera) - like shaped bokeh or long-exposure zooms.

Much of my own personal derision for iPhone work is the overall laziness and the assumption that getting a great image is easy (if it sucks, just Instagram it!  Problem solved...)

Sure, good photographers (great photographers) only need something to capture the image in front of them, framed as they see it in their head.  Artists have a different take, I guess.

Many of my examples above pertain less to model-based photography, I suppose.  However, I would feel like an ass showing up for a shoot with a model and whipping out an iPhone.  Although, I can kind of see the use in terms of doing some walk-through pre-shooting and the ease of zooming to show a model what I liked or wanted to see different.  That would be more for advertising-style shots and less for fashion or portraiture.  For the actual publishable/portfolio shots though... dSLR or film.
Jun 15 13 06:19 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Ken Warren Photography
Posts: 575
GLENMOORE, Pennsylvania, US


Shandra Stark wrote:

Yep!

Okay. Large format is completely different from 35mm film. The transition from 35mm to digital was basically seamless for me, and (I suspect) for most that made it.

Jun 15 13 07:13 pm  Link  Quote 
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