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Photographer
Grant Foto
Posts: 20
Houston, Texas, US


Ok I have been trying to get skin like this forever and I can never get it down! Its so frusterating, anybody know how to get rid of the reds and just get that nice even tan skin? I've tried desaturating the reds a bit and I get a dull skin...like my example in the bottom pic.

https://www.facebook.com/?ref=logo#!/ph … =3&theater


This is my attempt and its nowhere close =/ Mine looks dull and lifeless...

https://www.facebook.com/#!/photo.php?f … =1&theater
Jun 18 13 09:14 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
kane
Posts: 1,536
Biarritz, Aquitaine, France


Try pulling the high end of a blue curves layer down to pump a bit more gold into the skintones.
Jun 18 13 09:25 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Laura Bello
Posts: 1,236
Rochester, New York, US


Honestly I like the colors in yours better but either way.  When I correct skin color I select a color on the forehead or anywhere where the color is even toned and make a solid color layer and change the blending mode to color.  Then I mask out the areas that aren't skin.  You can also make the layer more saturated if you'd like her to look more tanned.

Now this leaves you with some over saturated shadows so what I do is a duplicate the solid color layer and shift the tones to match the shadows better.  You'll probably have to darken and desaturated them, take a color sample to best match them up.  Now this will effect all the colors but if you double click on the layer it'll open up the blending options.  Slide the white slider over to reduce the color in the lights and have it only affect the shadows.  If you hold alt and click it'll let you split the slider which will give you a smoother blend.

Normally at the end I put in a hue/sat layer and desaturate the highlights using the blending mode option mention above but you don't have to do that, I just feel it looks more realistic.  I also will often bump the flow of the color layer down to around 50% so it doesn't look overdone.

I hope that makes some kinda sense, anyways that's how I adjust skin tones :p

http://i1223.photobucket.com/albums/dd518/ariadnese8/thing-2_zps5c07f697.jpg

http://i1223.photobucket.com/albums/dd518/ariadnese8/thing_zps3f145e44.jpg
Jun 18 13 09:32 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Grant Foto
Posts: 20
Houston, Texas, US


Thank you both so much for the suggestions! I'm going to try these!
Jun 18 13 10:21 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
TMA Photo and Retouch
Posts: 709
New York, New York, US


Your first image... I would characterize the skin as looking in the orange family.

Your image... it lacks red saturation and yellow.

I would create the skin color you are after dynamically and interactively and in real time... so it looked just right to me. Heres how:

1. Put the original image on layer 1.

2. Create a new layers adjustment layer by going to the half moon icon on the bottom center of the layers pallet.  Choose curves from the choices.  Look for the Master pulldown or the RGB pulldown in the curve dialogue box.

3. Selecting the red curves channel... take the top right part of the curve...click on it... and then drag it left... across the top of the adjustment area...until you see the skin beginning to become red.  Now, change to the blue channel... and take the top right part of the curve... click on it... and move it to the right and down the edge of the adjustment area... until you see yellow being added to your image.  At some point now... you may have the colors on the skin that you are after!  If you want a more tanned / darker look to the skin...take the green channel and move the top right part of the curve to the right and down...this will add magenta... and will darken the skin colors towards a deeper orange tan.

Apply the new skin color:  Once you see the skin colors looking like you want them to be...then you can select and highlight this curves layer itself... and do a control or command "I" to invert the mask from a white mask to a black mask. Your color corrections will temporarily disappear...dont worry.  NOW, select and paint on that black mask with a 12% opacity soft white brush... and it will now add your new skin color to the areas you want. Paint in the skin where you want it... and however strong you want it... in each area.   The color will be totally transparent so it wont block up any pixels underneath.  You can continue to Adjust the curves to get the colors to look just perfect.  You can also adjust the opacity slider on the layer itself to adjust the overall strength to your liking. 

Some people might also want to create a lighter highlight skin color and a darker shadow side color and paint/blend those in with low opacity soft brush to get some shading of several skin colors.

Good luck

Cheers,

Ray
Jun 18 13 08:04 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Gulag
Posts: 1,222
Duluth, Georgia, US


1. dup the background, use Apply Image command to blend the red channel with the blue channel twice in multiply blend mode twice, and put the dup layer in luminosity mode. add a luminosity mask with just half the strength.

2. add a b&w adjustment layer, check the tint box, select darker brown color, in multiply blend mode, adjust to taste, and finally add a mask so that the effects only apply to skins. I created the skin mask using Select Color Range command.

http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3769/9083575188_3a11c7c9ba_b.jpg
Jun 19 13 12:25 am  Link  Quote 
Retoucher
CLICK retouch
Posts: 181
Denver, Colorado, US


Either do all form the above, and although it does work, isn't it just easier to select the area you want affected with pen tool, use gradient maps to color it?
Jun 19 13 05:41 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Grant Foto
Posts: 20
Houston, Texas, US


Thank you all so much for the suggestions!!!

I've actually tried to create a new layer set to color but it makes the shadows like a muddy muted color. I'm sure I'm not doing something correct though.
Jun 19 13 07:10 am  Link  Quote 
Retoucher
CLICK retouch
Posts: 181
Denver, Colorado, US


Grant Foto wrote:
Thank you all so much for the suggestions!!!

I've actually tried to create a new layer set to color but it makes the shadows like a muddy muted color. I'm sure I'm not doing something correct though.

Of course, that's why gradient map is used. smile

The same color on different luminosity gives either over saturated or under-saturated results.

Jun 19 13 08:01 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Grant Foto
Posts: 20
Houston, Texas, US


CLICK retouch wrote:

Of course, that's why gradient map is used. smile

The same color on different luminosity gives either over saturated or under-saturated results.

Gradient maps is something I still don't understand how to work. Lol! I've tried to read up on it but it confuses me.

Jun 19 13 08:05 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Gulag
Posts: 1,222
Duluth, Georgia, US


Grant Foto wrote:
Thank you all so much for the suggestions!!!

I've actually tried to create a new layer set to color but it makes the shadows like a muddy muted color. I'm sure I'm not doing something correct though.

Instead, set it to either Multiply or Soft Light depending on the colors you pick. Maybe you need to remap the colors of bright/mid/dark points.

Jun 19 13 08:07 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
DaveG Photo
Posts: 3
Los Angeles, California, US


Jul 03 13 09:39 pm  Link  Quote 
Retoucher
Peano
Posts: 4,106
Lynchburg, Virginia, US


Selective color adjustment layer, set to multiply mode. Apply to skin only. If tweaking is desired, make adjustments in the reds panel.

http://img521.imageshack.us/img521/5466/2n33.jpg
http://img507.imageshack.us/img507/8813/t69i.jpg
Jul 04 13 06:39 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Robert Randall
Posts: 13,842
Chicago, Illinois, US


Peano wrote:
Selective color adjustment layer, set to multiply mode. Apply to skin only. If tweaking is desired, make adjustments in the reds panel.

http://img521.imageshack.us/img521/5466/2n33.jpg
http://img507.imageshack.us/img507/8813/t69i.jpg

As a result of your technique, there appears to be a significant amount of posterization on the shoulder and face of the first model. What technique do you use to eliminate the posterization?

Jul 04 13 07:18 am  Link  Quote 
Retoucher
Peano
Posts: 4,106
Lynchburg, Virginia, US


Robert Randall wrote:
As a result of your technique, there appears to be a significant amount of posterization ...

That isn't a result of the technique.

Jul 04 13 07:48 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Robert Randall
Posts: 13,842
Chicago, Illinois, US


Peano wrote:

That isn't a result of the technique.

It wasn't there before the technique, what else could be the cause?

Jul 04 13 08:10 am  Link  Quote 
Retoucher
Peano
Posts: 4,106
Lynchburg, Virginia, US


Peano wrote:
That isn't a result of the technique.
Robert Randall wrote:
It wasn't there before the technique, what else could be the cause?

Yes it was. The image is only 55K and was originally saved at around quality level 3. It's loaded with blocking and other jpeg artifacts. The multiply layer is simply making those more obvious:

http://i1005.photobucket.com/albums/af171/retouch46/Forums/blocking2_zpsc13b4815.gif

Jul 04 13 09:26 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Robert Randall
Posts: 13,842
Chicago, Illinois, US


Peano wrote:

Peano wrote:
That isn't a result of the technique.

Yes it was. The image is only 55K and was originally saved at around quality level 3. It's loaded with blocking and other jpeg artifacts. The multiply layer is simply making those more obvious:

http://i1005.photobucket.com/albums/af171/retouch46/Forums/blocking2_zpsc13b4815.gif

I suppose that's a persuasive argument, until you realize it's the technique embellishing flaws. I've found that simple tool techniques almost always carry a downside with them. Personally, I think channel swapping via apply image is a less problematic technique. It's not a simple fix, but it usually works out better.

Jul 04 13 09:48 am  Link  Quote 
Retoucher
Peano
Posts: 4,106
Lynchburg, Virginia, US


Robert Randall wrote:
I suppose that's a persuasive argument, until you realize it's the technique embellishing flaws.

Flaws that won't be present in a high-res image:
http://i1005.photobucket.com/albums/af171/retouch46/Forums/troll_zps6daf125c.gif

If you have a better approach, post it and stop trolling.

Jul 04 13 09:59 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Robert Randall
Posts: 13,842
Chicago, Illinois, US


Peano wrote:

Flaws that won't be present in a high-res image:
http://i1005.photobucket.com/albums/af171/retouch46/Forums/troll_zps6daf125c.gif

If you have a better approach, post it and stop trolling.

Sorry for the delay, I was away with friends and family for the holiday.


I wasn’t aware that pointing out the failings in a technique was trolling; where I come from we call that being helpful.

Your technique embellishes flaws. The basic result of using the Multiply blend mode increases the density of darker tones, it has no effect on white. The result isn’t just a darkening of the image; it also increases the contrast of the image. In the first instance you posted, while flaws were present in the image, posterization was not. That only occurred after you applied your multiply method.

“Posterization of an image entails conversion of a continuous gradation of tone to several regions of fewer tones, with abrupt changes from one tone to another. This was originally done with photographic processes to create posters. It can now be done photographically or with digital image processing, and may be deliberate or may be an unintended artifact of color quantization.
The effect may be created deliberately, or happen accidentally. For artistic effect, most image editing programs provide a posterization feature, or photographic processes may be used.
Unwanted posterization, also known as banding, may occur when the color depth, sometimes called bit depth, is insufficient to accurately sample a continuous gradation of color tone. As a result, a continuous gradient appears as a series of discrete steps or bands of color — hence the name.”


In the second, higher res image you posted, posterization was not apparent after the application of the multiply layer, but increased contrast was. The increase in contrast led to an embellishment of flaws in the skin, thus increasing the retouch load for the picture. While your method might be suitable for the hobby enthusiast, it is far from desirable for the professional retouch artist.



I think the following method leads to less of a retouch load, and it’s a bit simpler than plate swapping.

Create a duplicate layer of your base image. Set the blending mode of the dupe layer to Luminosity. Click on the channel of the dupe layer with the least amount of detail (usually the red channel), and ask for a curve by clicking Command M. Drag the highlight point down from 255 to 128, or lower if you prefer. This method darkens the image without increasing contrast, thus eliminating the need for additional retouch caused by the technique used. If you feel this move dulls the image too much, simply apply a strong salt and pepper inverted HL mask to the dupe layer to allow the original HL values to shine through the technique. While this last part might increase unwanted contrast in certain areas, the simple fix is to paint away the part of the inverted HL mask that offends you.

Jul 06 13 03:46 pm  Link  Quote 
Retoucher
Peano
Posts: 4,106
Lynchburg, Virginia, US


Robert Randall wrote:
I wasn’t aware that pointing out the failings in a technique was trolling;... Your technique embellishes flaws.

So does sharpening. So does increasing contrast. So does increasing saturation. I didn't read any further, Robert. I'm just not interested in your trolling.

The increase in contrast led to an embellishment of flaws in the skin

Flaws in the skin. Not flaws in the image.

Jul 06 13 07:47 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Kevin Connery
Posts: 16,665
El Segundo, California, US


Moderator Warning!
Play nice, or you may not be able to play at all.
Jul 07 13 12:15 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Ruben Vasquez
Posts: 3,090
Puyallup, Washington, US


Robert Randall wrote:
I think the following method leads to less of a retouch load, and it’s a bit simpler than plate swapping.

Create a duplicate layer of your base image. Set the blending mode of the dupe layer to Luminosity. Click on the channel of the dupe layer with the least amount of detail (usually the red channel), and ask for a curve by clicking Command M. Drag the highlight point down from 255 to 128, or lower if you prefer. This method darkens the image without increasing contrast, thus eliminating the need for additional retouch caused by the technique used. If you feel this move dulls the image too much, simply apply a strong salt and pepper inverted HL mask to the dupe layer to allow the original HL values to shine through the technique. While this last part might increase unwanted contrast in certain areas, the simple fix is to paint away the part of the inverted HL mask that offends you.

I know how to make a highlight mask, but I'm not sure what you mean by salt and pepper. Can you elaborate on that?

Jul 07 13 12:06 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Robert Randall
Posts: 13,842
Chicago, Illinois, US


Ruben Vasquez wrote:

I know how to make a highlight mask, but I'm not sure what you mean by salt and pepper. Can you elaborate on that?

A salt n pepper mask is a term engravers applied to a method of creating a mask that held back pin dot highlights. It is nothing more than a deep highlight mask thats been inverted. I use engravers terms a lot because old habits die hard.

http://www.robert-randall.com/MM/SaltPepper.jpg

Jul 07 13 07:12 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Honey Stinger
Posts: 6,315
Madison, Wisconsin, US


Post hidden on Jul 07, 2013 10:44 pm
Reason: violates rules
Comments:
Please see earlier warning.
Jul 07 13 09:02 pm  Link 
Photographer
richy01
Posts: 153
Amsterdam, Noord-Holland, Netherlands


What is the problem between robert Randall and Peano here and in other threads?...it isn't contributing anything but waste of time and space...
Jul 12 13 09:25 am  Link  Quote 
Retoucher
name changed by admin
Posts: 43
Saint Petersburg, Saint Petersburg, Russia


you need some more texture and try to put out the blue from the highlights
Jul 12 13 12:56 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Nathanized
Posts: 10
Singapore, Singapore, Singapore


after experimenting and some combinations suggestion from above...did a 2 edits (middle and right)

view larger size here:
http://i261.photobucket.com/albums/ii43 … g~original

http://i261.photobucket.com/albums/ii43/Ur_Fantasy_Guy/sample_zps95a3291f.jpg
Jul 13 13 04:34 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Garrett Sanders
Posts: 1,106
Columbia, South Carolina, US


Using Adobe PS Bridge, it should be as simple as bringing up the temperature, lower the exposure a tad, and adjusting the hue to ensure it doesn't go too orange or yellowish.
Jul 13 13 05:03 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Trill Imagery
Posts: 125
Palmdale, California, US


NS Berlyn wrote:
you need some more texture and try to put out the blue from the highlights

sounds about right

Jul 14 13 07:19 pm  Link  Quote 
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