login info join!
Forums > Newbie Forum > Poses Search   Reply
Model
Angie Angelina
Posts: 15
New York, New York, US


Sometimes it's so hard not to keep doing the same poses.

As your shooting, you feel like your doing well & when you go over them later, so many with the arm(s) over the head....Again!

So, any advice on what to do with the arms....when your not holding anything, can't keep going for the hair!!!

Thanks!
Jun 26 13 01:35 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Marin Photography NYC
Posts: 6,995
New York, New York, US


Practice putting them someplace else. big_smile You tube videos, magazines, here you can search other models profiles and try different poses. Practice nude in front of a mirror, that helps.
Jun 26 13 01:42 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Simmagination
Posts: 3,129
Westminster, Maryland, US


Until a model comes on and offers better advice than I can obviously give (there's a reason I stay behind the camera) wink I would say check out other models and how they pose and practice practice practice!  Don't worry, you're not alone- a lot of models seem to have a "go to" as far as hands go- they just are used to placing their hands in certain ways.  It's all in the discipline, which is why modeling is a lot harder than a lot of people sometimes claim is it. wink

BTW welcome to the Mayhem! smile
Jun 26 13 01:46 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Select Models
Posts: 35,552
Upland, California, US


Close to 1000 arms going all directions on this MM port with nearly 500 images.  You're welcome to checkit out for ideas... wink
Jun 26 13 01:55 pm  Link  Quote 
Artist/Painter
Grin Without a Cat
Posts: 426
Las Vegas, Nevada, US


Think of modeling as though it was acting (it actually is, you know...).  For each shot you are going to do, if you are not given direction by the photographer, make up your own.  Imagine you are sitting at a sidewalk cafe drinking tea, or imagine that you are a bird taking flight, or imagine that you are a cat sneaking through the brush...you get the idea...the point is to mentally project yourself into a role and then use your body to act out that role.  You would be amazed at what you will come up with for poses.

Cheers!
Jun 26 13 01:59 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
ShotbyRon
Posts: 767
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, US


As I always tell the models I work with, make small adjustments when trying to pose. Kind go with what feels nature. Don't over think it! Which is something a lot of new models tend to do. Like moving your arm from your hip to you stomach, then kind of slide it up to you shoulder. If you really can't think of something or get stuck, ask your photographer for direction. Take a "cheat sheet" to your shoots. Maybe like 10-15 poses you really love. Try those out.

Posing at home in your mirror is the best option. Try doing it right before your shoot. Then if you find a pose you like, make a mental note of it
Jun 26 13 02:05 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Marin Photography NYC
Posts: 6,995
New York, New York, US


Save some images on your phone of poses you like.
Jun 26 13 02:08 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
robert b mitchell
Posts: 1,295
Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada


Check MM and make a "Posing List for Arms and Hands". You should not have any trouble filling it up. That is the most common question I get from my models. In reality it is sooooo easy to solve!
Jun 26 13 03:12 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Bare Essential Photos
Posts: 3,293
Upland, California, US


To Angie --

Angie Angelina wrote:
Sometimes it's so hard not to keep doing the same poses.

As your shooting, you feel like your doing well & when you go over them later, so many with the arm(s) over the head....Again!

So, any advice on what to do with the arms....when your not holding anything, can't keep going for the hair!!!

Thanks!

You're welcome to check out my two accounts -- Bare Essential Photos #1482809 and Happy Guy Photos #1474703. There's some variety.

Jun 26 13 03:39 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Angie Angelina
Posts: 15
New York, New York, US


Thanks all for the advice.....
Jun 29 13 05:00 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
B R U N E S C I
Posts: 25,319
Bath, England, United Kingdom


Work with better photographers!!

NB. I haven't looked at your portfolio. This is general advice for models wishing to improve their posing, pictures, expressions... everything really.

Working with a good photographer is the best way to improve. Sure, study poses from lists, practise in the mirror etc., but that will only get anybody so far. Working with a good photographer who can give meaningful direction is an essential next step.





Just my $0.02

Ciao
Stefano

www.stefanobrunesci.com
Jun 29 13 05:33 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Thomas Van Dyke
Posts: 1,482
Washington, District of Columbia, US


Angie Angelina wrote:
...poses...

Angie, as mentioned above, modeling is silent acting, thus the want of a script mandates the skilled use of the hands to emote expressively into the lens... watch the old silent movies to see this first hand...

That said working with tenured agency talent it becomes obvious what practice, experience and length of time on set brings to the dance...

At the commercial level a strong repertoire is a finely constructed drama, a choreographed kinetic art form, fluid movement of an endless stream of complimentary poses each flowing one into another with every flash of the strobes... generating unadulterated adoration in the eye of the beholder...

As an emerging talent a full length mirror is a model's best friend albeit please realize it builds an undesirable habit of always looking at the lens... this doesn't compliment fashion which is better severed with a 30 degree off camera gaze (follow your nose) to catch both iris... remember fashion is social narrative and is not about the model, it is about lifestyle... or for catalog it is about product (the ensemble being showcased) Hope this makes sense...

Stefano's wisdom is stellar also... collaborating with a photographer who is gifted with the skill of directing can/will achieve wonders on set... only the lens person knows the visual story unfolding on set, being able to follow their direction allows you to relax more and "be in the moment"   

btw, like Stefano I've haven't reviewed your book... that is what the critique forum is about...

My thoughts? Might study what has made it to large circulation print for an idea of what may be of value to master… 

welcome to the dance...

Jul 01 13 12:54 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Mark Salo
Posts: 8,118
Olney, Maryland, US


Angie Angelina wrote:
Sometimes it's so hard not to keep doing the same poses.

As your shooting, you feel like your doing well & when you go over them later, so many with the arm(s) over the head....Again!

So, any advice on what to do with the arms....when your not holding anything, can't keep going for the hair!!!

Thanks!

The photographer should warn you if you keep doing the same poses.  Also, the photographer is entitled to suggest some poses that he/she would like to see you do.

If a model seem uncertain what to do with her arms or otherwise, I give her a prop to work with.

Jul 01 13 01:48 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Odin Photo
Posts: 1,458
Salt Lake City, Utah, US


You can look up poses online and practice the ones you like and any that you consider standards for your target market. Pose in front of a mirror to get the shape and then close your eyes, shake out, and do it again to see how you did without being able to see yourself. This is a good practice to increase your proprioception. Pay attention to how it feels when you are in position so that you can get there more quickly on set.

As far as using the same poses, if the photographer isn't saying anything, just ask "How do you want me to pose next?" In my opinion better photographers won't let you even get this question out, because they've already got some solid images in their mind about what they want to create and they'll be posing you most of the time. If they say "Just keep doing what you're doing.", or "Whatever you want." they clearly don't know what they want, so you can't feel badly about not knowing what they want either wink

Get a collection of poses together that you feel are flattering for you and then let the photographer make it her or his responsibility to take you beyond that.

Good luck to you and much success in work and life. Welcome to the mayhem smile
Jul 01 13 02:11 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Miss Photog
Posts: 287
VALLEY VILLAGE, California, US


robert b mitchell wrote:
Check MM and make a "Posing List for Arms and Hands". You should not have any trouble filling it up. That is the most common question I get from my models. In reality it is sooooo easy to solve!

+1
also make a folder of images on your computer that you find on other sites.
tear out magazine pics of poses you like.
make small adjustments when posing and switching from pose to various pose.
watch youtube videos.
you can even buy a book on posing (or check your local library): http://www.amazon.com/Photographing-Wom … odel+poses
http://www.amazon.com/000-Fashion-Poses … odel+poses
http://www.amazon.com/500-Poses-Photogr … odel+poses
and don't forget to practice in front of a mirror. If you practice enough it will become second nature and you won't have to THINK about what pose you want to do next, it will just flow. If you can, have a friend take snap shots of you posing so you can see which are the more flattering angles.

Jul 01 13 02:18 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Camerosity
Posts: 5,081
Saint Louis, Missouri, US


The best models I’ve worked with generally flow from one pose to the next by making one or two small, incremental changes in pose after each shot. Such changes might include changing the position of one or both legs, the way the head is turned, moving an arm or even just changing the expression.

That’s what I call Stage 4 modeling. It’s taught by the best pose coaches and at the best modeling schools. Years ago it was taught by the largest modeling schools, but apparently not anymore – and the value of these schools has declined sharply over the years.

At one point I was toying with the idea of asking the best model I know to partner with me and produce an ebook. Of course the book would include text, but it would also include photos showing how she started with one pose, then flowed into the next one, and the next one, and the next one, etc.

Then I came across a pair of DVDs by a former model-turned-photographer in the Detroit area. The only way an ebook could compete with the DVDs is in pricing.

http://www.photographingmodels.com/reg.html

In addition to the two DVD’s for models, Mary does a DVD on posing for photographers.

If you’d like to know more about Mary and her work, click the “Home” link at the bottom of the page. I only know her by reputation. I’ve never met her, and I know a few people who have worked with her.

Several agencies in Michigan and surrounding states send their new recruits to Mary for their first shoot – because she can (and does) teach them things in a single shoot that the agencies just aren’t equipped to teach.

The only other ways I know to learn this information are to work with a good pose coach, find one of the few really good modeling schools or get signed by a top agency that will provide hours and hours or coaching and send you on an endless stream of photo shoots where you will learn to pose – all of which you’ll eventually pay for out of future earnings, of course, as part of the agency’s cost of developing you.

Oh yeah. Here are the four stages.

Stage 1 – Deer in the headlights. I’d say about 40% of models go through this, and for most of them, it’s over after the first shoot.

Stage 2 – “Tell me what to do.” The model wants the photographer to direct her poses – down to the last finger and toe.

Stage 3 – Memorizing canned poses and repeating them at each shoot.

Stage 4 – Modeling in Motion. The model can quickly an easily flow from one pose to another, creating a theoretically unlimited number of poses, and do so in a way that best presents her body and face to the camera 95% of the time.

And at Stage 4, you’ll know and “feel” that each pose is “right.”

After getting warmed up and “in the flow,” many models can do 20 ppm (poses per minute) or more – although anything much faster than 20 ppm really doesn’t allow enough time to refocus and reframe the shot.

You have to work up to that speed each time (each shoot or each wardrobe change). You don’t start there. It won’t happen at every shoot, and it may take 10-15 minutes to get there when it does. Really, reaching that speed is not what’s important. What’s important is that when you reach a peak, if means everything is just working and clicking perfectly.

(For photographers who say shooting 20ppm is “spray and pray,” many of my best shots have come at this pace. It only happens when the model and photographer are in sync and everything is just flowing perfectly – and usually it only lasts for a minute or so. But it’s not unusual to get more outstanding photos in that minute or so that you can possibly use – or easily choose from. That minute or so is the climax of the shoot. Afterward, it’s time to pack up and go home – or do the next wardrobe change.)

There’s also a fifth stage. That’s when a model at Stage 4 can also give a quality. storytelling/emotive expression that’s in tune with the concept, setting, lighting, mood and purpose of the shoot every time. Well, realistically, 90-95% of the time.

Most models don’t even begin to get good at expressing until they are very comfortable with posing (at Stage 3 or higher). That’s why so many photos of newbie models have blank looks, frowns or expressions that seem to say, “I sure hope this pose looks okay.” They are so focused on pose that they’re not even thinking about expressions. There are occasional exceptions, aka “naturals.”

At Stage 4 you can essentially put your body on autopilot and focus your attention on expressions.

When you’re a solid Stage 5 model, your skills will be up there with the top models anywhere – and the main differences will be in your look, style, approach, how you work with people, who you work with and the contacts you've made.

Alas, the vast majority models (on MM or not) will never get past Stage 3, imo.
Jul 02 13 03:24 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Fototid
Posts: 33
Lund, Skåne, Sweden


Browse around the site for inspirations sounds like a good idea.
As for finding canned poses for stage 3 (good description by the way) i like the following mosly because they take out the actuall photo and let me focus on the pose.
http://digital-photography-school.com/8 … rtraiture.
Not all of them are relevent for this site but il let you filter that yourself.
Jul 15 13 11:49 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Select Models
Posts: 35,552
Upland, California, US


Close to 500 images here with hundreds of arms goin in all directions... you're welcome to check'm out... wink
Jul 15 13 02:15 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Charlie-CNP
Posts: 2,604
New York, New York, US


That Italian Guy wrote:
Work with better photographers!!
Working with a good photographer is the best way to improve. Sure, study poses from lists, practise in the mirror etc., but that will only get anybody so far. Working with a good photographer who can give meaningful direction is an essential next step.

+1 agreed with Stefano. A good photographer should know how to pose a model for the most flattering results. You can only experiment so far in front of a mirror with limited experience. good luck

Jul 15 13 02:22 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Izzie G
Posts: 9
Shreveport, Louisiana, US


Grin Without a Cat wrote:
Think of modeling as though it was acting (it actually is, you know...).  For each shot you are going to do, if you are not given direction by the photographer, make up your own.  Imagine you are sitting at a sidewalk cafe drinking tea, or imagine that you are a bird taking flight, or imagine that you are a cat sneaking through the brush...you get the idea...the point is to mentally project yourself into a role and then use your body to act out that role.  You would be amazed at what you will come up with for poses.

Cheers!

Awesome advice! Thank you!

Jul 15 13 05:22 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Drew Smith Photography
Posts: 5,209
Nottingham, England, United Kingdom


Yup - there's a huge resource right here on MM of wonderful models striking all kinds of wonderful poses. Fill ya boots. smile
Jul 16 13 12:41 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
bwhstudios
Posts: 73
Hingham, Massachusetts, US


Like football it's a game of angles.  Leg(s) bent, hands on hips etc.
Jul 17 13 08:52 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
MCPHOTO
Posts: 731
Duvall, Washington, US


Ask the photographer for suggestions. Look at what other models are doing for a similar theme and make a list of them. I will actually print out examples for models sometimes especially newer models. To show them ideas. The practice those new poses in the mirror and with a photographer especially if you have one you work with regularly.
  Also just a suggestion some models worry so much about the pose they forget about facial expressions.  It's always good to work on that as well.
Jul 17 13 09:01 am  Link  Quote 
  Search   Reply



main | browse | casting/travel | forums | shout box | help | advertising | contests | share | join the mayhem

more modelmayhem on: | | | edu

©2006-2014 ModelMayhem.com. All Rights Reserved.
MODEL MAYHEM is a registered trademark.
Toggle Worksafe Mode: Off | On
Terms | Privacy | Careers