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Photographer
Robert Randall
Posts: 13,842
Chicago, Illinois, US


Robert Randall wrote:
The context was people in general, and it could be argued he was talking about the kind of people that buy tabloid rags at the checkout counter.
Peano wrote:
No, that wasn't the context. Had you actually listened to what he said, you might have heard him say this:

"This is a good 120 degrees wrong. I mean it’s really unbelievably broken. And what’s amazing about this, and I do this for a living, is that when I first looked at it I didn’t notice. It was only after the cognitive exercise" [emphasis added].

You're correct, he did say exactly that, and then a few seconds later he said "Your brain doesn't see the differences", and it could be argued that I simply mis-quoted him and used the word people in place of the word your, mainly because the plural form of the personal pronoun "you" refers to people. Unless you think it refers to brains, then we truly are at an impasse.

Robert Randall wrote:
I would argue that in the specific context of photographers or retouchers, his statement would be categorically incorrect.
Peano wrote:
No, in the context of photographers, retouchers, and even forensic image experts, his statement still holds. Farid isn't "the kind of people that buy tabloid rags." He is Distinguished Professor of Computational Science at Dartmouth College, and chair of Dartmouth's Neukom Institute for Computational Science. He specializes in image analysis, human perception, and has been called the "father" of digital image forensics by NOVA scienceNOW.

You say his statement holds true in my context, I say it doesn't. I saw that cover at the checkout counter in my local Dominick's Finer Foods, and the very first thing I noticed was the wrong shadows. Unlike you, and it seems likely, Mr Farid as well, I've gone through almost 4 decades of visual training, starting with my job as an engravers apprentice in 1976. Back then, had I worked on a picture with wrong shadows, and not brought it to the attention of my supervisor, I would have lost my job. Since it's my feeling that anyone that calls himself a photographer or a retoucher, shares at least a similar experience with me, I included them in my context.

Jul 07 13 05:31 am  Link  Quote 
Retoucher
Peano
Posts: 4,106
Lynchburg, Virginia, US


Robert Randall wrote:
You say his statement holds true in my context, I say it doesn't. I saw that cover at the checkout counter in my local Dominick's Finer Foods, and the very first thing I noticed was the wrong shadows. Unlike you, and it seems likely, Mr Farid as well, I've gone through almost 4 decades of visual training, starting with my job as an engravers apprentice in 1976. Back then, had I worked on a picture with wrong shadows, and not brought it to the attention of my supervisor, I would have lost my job. Since it's my feeling that anyone that calls himself a photographer or a retoucher, shares at least a similar experience with me, I included them in my context.

I think Farid would say that you have a habit of "doing the cognitive exercise."

Jul 07 13 06:21 am  Link  Quote 
Retoucher
Peano
Posts: 4,106
Lynchburg, Virginia, US


Kevin Connery wrote:
Actually, since he does buy tabloid rags, he is the kind of people that buy tabloid rags. smile

You're confusing act with character.

Jul 07 13 06:22 am  Link  Quote 
Retoucher
Kristiana-Retouch
Posts: 289
London, England, United Kingdom


FLEXmanta wrote:
It could not be easier to understand:

TYPES OF WEBSITES

-Begginer retoucher:
You need a website for people to know you exist. Your images will likely be not too good. You can't allow the bad quality of the images to hide how well you can retouch. Have example, lots of them, and maybe before and afters too.

-Established retoucher:
Have a website but get rid of all the amateur stuff. Only show your best work there. Show the covers and tearsheets. If the photographer you work for is also established, make sure his name shows. If there are big magazines in your portfolio, give them priority. If you have a couple top models in your portfolio, that is what you need to show.

-Established retoucher who retouches for famous photographers (Steven Meisel, Mert&Marcus, etc):
You don't really need a website anymore... If you want to have one, make it blank website with only some information. At most, only show the magazine covers, but I wouldn't. A blank website with contact information would be more than enough. When you work for Steven Meisel, part of your job is to keep it a secret.

+1 could be something like this
although there is always space for your creativity with your own website

Jul 07 13 07:28 am  Link  Quote 
Retoucher
Alyssa June Retouch
Posts: 159
Denver, Colorado, US


FLEXmanta wrote:
It could not be easier to understand:

TYPES OF WEBSITES

-Begginer retoucher:
You need a website for people to know you exist. Your images will likely be not too good. You can't allow the bad quality of the images to hide how well you can retouch. Have example, lots of them, and maybe before and afters too.

-Established retoucher:
Have a website but get rid of all the amateur stuff. Only show your best work there. Show the covers and tearsheets. If the photographer you work for is also established, make sure his name shows. If there are big magazines in your portfolio, give them priority. If you have a couple top models in your portfolio, that is what you need to show.

-Established retoucher who retouches for famous photographers (Steven Meisel, Mert&Marcus, etc):
You don't really need a website anymore... If you want to have one, make it blank website with only some information. At most, only show the magazine covers, but I wouldn't. A blank website with contact information would be more than enough. When you work for Steven Meisel, part of your job is to keep it a secret.

After reading through all the disagreements and opinions, this sums it all up nicely!

Jul 08 13 02:34 pm  Link  Quote 
Retoucher
RON IMAGES EDITED
Posts: 482
Miami, Florida, US


Wrong post.... My bad
Jul 08 13 04:15 pm  Link  Quote 
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