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first12
Artist/Painter
The3LivingAndThe3Dead
Posts: 963
Los Angeles, California, US


Marciofs wrote:
A sculptor who no longer has access to a chisel, if he can't make sculpture from marble he can make from clay. It means he still can make sculpture. Even if he still needs a chisel it is just a peace of metal.

A digital artist with no access a computer is able to learn an other art and make other craft, but no longer digital art.

A sculptor with no access to ZBrush or Mudbox can use clay. He's still a painter.

A painter with no access to Artrage, Corel Painter or Photoshop can still use a canvas and paint. He's still a sculptor.

A photographer with no access to a DSLR can use an SLR. He's still a photographer.

What is a 'digital artist?' I'm not even sure what that means.

Jul 13 13 11:58 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Marcio Faustino
Posts: 2,016
Freiburg, Baden-Württemberg, Germany


You may be a digital sculptor or a digital painter but at the end it is all digital art that needs a computer ruing in order to create.

A digital sculptor without a computer can learn how to make real sculpture but the digital no longer exist without a computer (or a machine running). The same with digital photo, etc.

I don't like to spend my time with trolls so I am leaving the topic now.

Have a good weekend.


Marcio Faustino
Marcio Faustino - Traditional Prints
Are you an aspiring model?
Jul 13 13 03:02 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Jeffrey M Fletcher
Posts: 4,344
Asheville, North Carolina, US


Marciofs wrote:
The discussion is about being dependent of a machine to work in order to be able to produce art in such media.

Yes, pretty much all photography and certainly all common types, use machines.

Jul 13 13 03:11 pm  Link  Quote 
Artist/Painter
The3LivingAndThe3Dead
Posts: 963
Los Angeles, California, US


Marciofs wrote:
You may be a digital sculptor or a digital painter but at the end it is all digital art that needs a computer ruing in order to create.

I still don't know exactly what point you are trying to make. I've lost interest in trying to get it, and I'd be surprised if anyone else here gets it.

I do know one thing for sure: any decent digital sculptor is a sculptor first.

Marciofs wrote:
I don't like to spend my time with trolls so I am leaving the topic now.

Have a good weekend.

You should come back just long enough to apologize for this offensive remark.

Jul 13 13 04:37 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
AG Media 13
Posts: 227
Townsville, Queensland, Australia


The more competent the technology, the less disruption between me and the image.
Jul 14 13 02:57 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Terrell Gates
Posts: 1,042
Santa Fe, New Mexico, US


I don't care.... I don't worry about it... It's just another way, another tool, in the quiver to create images...
Jul 14 13 03:08 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Frozen Instant Imagery
Posts: 3,727
Dublin, Dublin, Ireland


Marciofs wrote:
"When artist depends on machines (not tools) to create; the machines' capabilities are the controlling factors of the joint creations that comes from the union of artist with machine.
An Artist's tools on the other hand can be created by the hand of the artist and is not dependent on the bureaucracy of technology."


Which made me think. How digital photographers and digital artists are limited by the technology.

Have you ever thought about it?

Yes, I've thought about it. Funnily enough, I think of shooting digital as freeing me from some of the constraints I had when shooting film.

When I was shooting film I had to choose the speed and white balance of the film before shooting. Now I can change speed from shot to shot, and I can set the white balance when I'm processing the RAWs.

As for "an artist's tools are created by the hand of the artist" - sorry, but that sounds awfully pretentious. Few painters make their own brushes, for example. Some (few, I suspect) make their own pigments, but they don't weave their own canvas, or carve their own stretchers from a piece of tree. Oh, they could, but that's not essential to the art. 

An artist can work in many media. Some architects are arguably artists, creating their art from the cumulative work of an entire team of builders, using lots of machines and high technology. The architect's hands might not touch the building during construction, yet the finished building can be recognised as his/her artwork.

I have some pieces by an artist (whose name I forget, sadly). These pieces are created using high tech - one is a small metal sculpture created using an early 3D printer, another is a glass cube with an image created inside it using high-intensity lasers. Both are beautiful artworks, and neither could have been created using older technologies.

There is no shame in using the latest technology can offer in creating art. There has been a snobbery about it for a long time, though. Perhaps we are supposed to be impressed by how hard the artist had to work to create the artwork?

Jul 14 13 05:30 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Fotografica Gregor
Posts: 4,120
Alexandria, Virginia, US


I have been shooting since 1968 in photojournalism, portraiture, architectural photography, landscape, glamour, art nudes, and more recently editorial fashion and beauty

I have shot emulsions of all kinds -  in 35mm 6x7 4x5 8x10 -

I've shot on metal plate and glass plate

and I've shot digital -

Digital is by far the least "limiting"  but I would not say that it is the most "compelling"

as long as the "artist" shoots raw files and uses manual control - what they are doing is "authentic" as far as it goes -

but then again,  even later generation film cameras had "programs" and took creative control of the process away from the "artist" if you allowed them to do so.....

ultimately, "art" is in the eye of the beholder -  the process is meaningful only to the artist....
Jul 14 13 06:15 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Kevin Connery
Posts: 16,878
El Segundo, California, US


Marciofs wrote:
A sculptor who no longer has access to a chisel, if he can't make sculpture from marble he can make from clay. It means he still can make sculpture. Even if he still needs a chisel it is just a peace of metal.

A digital artist with no access a computer is able to learn an other art and make other craft, but no longer digital art.

Your example is again flawed. A marble sculptor who no longer has access to a chisel can no longer make marble sculptures. He may be able to make clay-based sculptures, but it's not a given; the medium is quite different. He might be able to make wood-based sculptures, but that, too, is not the same. Etc.

Yes, a traditional artist, artificially deprived of his tools, may be able to shift to another form of art (e.g. sculptor to painter, watercolorist to oil painter). In exactly the same way, a digital artist, artificially deprived of all his tools, may be able to shift to another form of art. In both cases, however, it's not the same artform.

In any event, since you maintain you're not trying to convince anyone, and it's clear you're not interested in listening to reasons why your stance is flawed, I'll retire.

Jul 14 13 11:09 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Marcio Faustino
Posts: 2,016
Freiburg, Baden-Württemberg, Germany


Frozen Instant Imagery wrote:
I have some pieces by an artist (whose name I forget, sadly). These pieces are created using high tech - one is a small metal sculpture created using an early 3D printer, another is a glass cube with an image created inside it using high-intensity lasers. Both are beautiful artworks, and neither could have been created using older technologies.

This is what I am talking about!!! The digital work is limited by the digital technology. There is no way to deny this fact.

Frozen Instant Imagery wrote:
There is no shame in using the latest technology can offer in creating art.

Of course there is no shame using the latest technology. Nobody here is saying the opposite.

Jul 14 13 11:10 pm  Link  Quote 
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