login info join!
Forums > Hair, Makeup & Styling > How can I make a hair stylist's & MUA's life easy? Search   Reply
Model
Erin McDermott
Posts: 3
Charlotte, North Carolina, US


Hello! I was just wondering if any hair stylist's or MUA's had any tips for me before showing up to my shoot. What are some things you love and hate that models do before getting their hair and makeup done.

Thanks!

-Erin
Aug 18 13 07:50 pm  Link  Quote 
Body Painter
BodyPainter Rich
Posts: 17,899
Sacramento, California, US


Show up on time.

Hair and face should be clean and product free

Hair and face should be healthy, well hydrated, and cared for


That's the most important part.

Otherwise, be patient, be nice, don't talk or text on your phone while they are trying to do their work, be considerate

When it comes time for them to be finished, don't mess with what they have done... if you have something nice to say "Wow, I love what you did with my lips!" that is good. If you do not have something  nice to say, just keep quiet and see what the photographer has to say about it.

Be respectful.

Do these things and your MUA/Hair Stylist will love working with you.
Aug 18 13 08:28 pm  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
Jenn Holmes
Posts: 20
Los Angeles, California, US


If I were your MUA/Hair Stylist, I would say:

1. Make sure your face is clean, and your hair is dry with no major tangles or product in it. Maybe pop a mint if you're unsure about your breath.

2. Be polite and chat a bit, but understand that I might be under a strict time limit and may not be able to be your best friend or answer every hair and makeup question you've ever had.

3. Understand that the look I'm giving you may not be something you're absolutely crazy about, but it's the look I was asked to give you for the shoot/event/etc. You can always wear your favorite shades and styles on your own time.

If you have any specific questions you'd like to ask, go for it smile
Aug 18 13 08:36 pm  Link  Quote 
Wardrobe Stylist
Tiffany_B
Posts: 1,325
Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, US


Here are some things that you should keep in mind:

1) Be honest if you use hair extensions, especially if they're synthetic. This can be problematic based on what the plan for your hair is.

2) If you have any known make-up allergies speak up about them.

3) Don't show up in concealer thinking that will help speed the process along. As a general rule you want to show up with both your face and hair product free. If that's absolutely not possible because of a casting or work prior keep the product to a minimum and don't freak if the hairstylist wets your hair in an attempt to get some of it out.

4) You're not going to love every hairstyle or make-up application, model like you love it anyway. The only time you should really say anything is if something is hurting you e.g. if you're burned with a curling iron or if a headpiece is too heavy.

5) Keep make-up remover wipes and hair ties and a comb and brush in your purse. Some looks you'll love and want to keep for the rest of the day but for others this won't be practical and you want to be prepared to clean your face and put your hair in a ponytail if you have plans post shoot.
Aug 18 13 09:35 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Erin McDermott
Posts: 3
Charlotte, North Carolina, US


Wow! All of these replies are great. Thank you so much everyone! I was going to show up with a bit of concealer, but now I know not to! Very helpful.
Aug 18 13 10:38 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Mika
Posts: 1,538
Miami, Florida, US


BodyPainter Rich wrote:
Show up on time.

Hair and face should be clean and product free

Hair and face should be healthy, well hydrated, and cared for


That's the most important part.

Otherwise, be patient, be nice, don't talk or text on your phone while they are trying to do their work, be considerate

When it comes time for them to be finished, don't mess with what they have done... if you have something nice to say "Wow, I love what you did with my lips!" that is good. If you do not have something  nice to say, just keep quiet and see what the photographer has to say about it.

Be respectful.

Do these things and your MUA/Hair Stylist will love working with you.

Wow... perpetuating the stereotype that models should be seen and not heard. The photographer isn't always the one making the decisions, you realize this, yes?

Speak your opinion. I've had horrible makeup applied by a "makeup artist" that the photographer didn't comment on - and I mean HORRIBLE. If you won't speak up, sometimes, no one else will.

Aug 18 13 11:15 pm  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
Sarah Zul
Posts: 43
Singapore, Singapore, Singapore


Mika wrote:

Wow... perpetuating the stereotype that models should be seen and not heard. The photographer isn't always the one making the decisions, you realize this, yes?

Speak your opinion. I've had horrible makeup applied by a "makeup artist" that the photographer didn't comment on - and I mean HORRIBLE. If you won't speak up, sometimes, no one else will.

I think if you're the client, then do speak up. Your opinions are what we wanna hear. But if it's the photographer who is the client or someone else but you, then I think you shouldn't say anything. Even if the makeup is not to your liking. Think about it this way, if you're not the client and yet you're opening your mouth to voice out a concern (ugly makeup) then the photographer/client will not wanna hire you because they will think you might have something bad to say about them too.

If the concern is that there are smudges or eyeshadow fall outs, or if the hair piece is unintentionally slanted, perhaps you can voice out but do so nicely. Instead of saying 'my head piece is slanted, can you fix it?', I suggest 'I like the head piece, is it meant to slant a little?'

I have models comment that my lip liner is not too even or things like that, but they do so nicely, so I'm fine with that. Because I see it as they're helping me out. I've never had a model who said they don't like it. That could mean they were keeping it to themselves or that they really do like it. I always offer them a makeup remover wipe and moisturizer after every shoot. Some have declined it and some have thanked me for it.

Aug 19 13 01:56 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
JohnEnger
Posts: 763
Jessheim, Akershus, Norway


Mika wrote:
Wow... perpetuating the stereotype that models should be seen and not heard. The photographer isn't always the one making the decisions, you realize this, yes?

Speak your opinion. I've had horrible makeup applied by a "makeup artist" that the photographer didn't comment on - and I mean HORRIBLE. If you won't speak up, sometimes, no one else will.

IMHO that depends on who is paying the MUA. If I was hiring model and MUA and asked for a specific look, I'd be pretty upset if the model disagreed with the MUA's work...

Aug 19 13 02:25 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Philipe
Posts: 5,208
Pomona, California, US


Ok for me..

-Come with a clean face, a little sweat is ok if its hot (I have a facial wipe, to clean the face) prior to moisturizer or and primer and of course foundation.
Its also good for the model to cool down (if she is coming in from the hot sun) prior to makeup. Because the temperature skin can effect the makeup application...

-Clean hair is good.. But Blown dry hair, with a little bit of product (brushed out so its not stiff) For me is ideal for hair styling. Even the great Martin Parsons will sometimes begin his instructional by saying "her hair has been blown dry with some product).
Again for me this is good. because it will tame fly away and help against static electricity. Also add some resistances (than limp) when styling, making it easier to style.. 

- DRY HAIR is very important, unless the hair stylist decides to blow dry style the hair..
Blow drying the hair can take too much time, if you plain to use to hot irons..
Here is a hint to check to see if the hair is dry. After blowing drying, wait one to two minutes.. If the hair feels cool to the touch it still has moisture in the hair.
(thats not good for styling, or hot irons, in some cases the moisture in the hair can work as a conductor. When the hot iron touches the moist hair, it shocks the hair where in some cases the whole lock of hair will get hot and can burn or feel super hot on the scalp). Check around the nape area too, that a common spot many model miss when drying the hair..
The hair should feel like no temperature or room temperature..

-Don't come in with a pony tail in hair (wearing a ban in the hair)..
It will leave a ban mark in the hair, also its not good for full volume hair styles.
Also, wearing a will cause stress in the hair and if the model has been wearing the ban for awhile, it can actually set the hair in that pattern that the model came in.

-Remember your a model, a professional model will always come with nails filled or done in a neutral color. If you can can, bring a warm, cool and neutral nail polish color as options. Long toe nails, chipped toe and finger nail polish, is bad...
On bigger shoots such as a campaign or ad, a manicurist is often used on set.
But ask the producer or photographer first on what they want..

-Remember to remove earnings and rings before coming on set.
But bring jewelry if need if the stylist does not provide jewelry.

-If you show, up with a clean face, with moisturizer make sure to give it some time so the skin adjust and balances out..
If I put moisturizer on the model when doing makeup. I only put on areas that are dry.

-Brush your teeth (common sense but you will be surprise)

- Make sure your lips are ready, moisten your lips, make sure when you arrive there is no dry skin or chapped lips..

-If you use eye drops, do it before you go on the shoot, not during makeup. Which can leave the eyes (ironically) red. eye drops are not a quick fix, but merely a way to add moisture to the eye, give the eye some time to adjust so it can be ready..

-No parting or staying up late the night before. (which is very common in the industry)

- don't eat food the night before or the day of that causes inflammation.
Such as spicy food, hot flavored food..
It can make the skin on the face look bloated or puffy, it can also make the models stomach; upset.

- bring pills for a head ache and menstrual cramps. Also tampon or any woman's hygiene needs.. (yes it happens)


I've been doing hair for 20 years and makeup for 15
Aug 19 13 02:54 am  Link  Quote 
Wardrobe Stylist
Tiffany_B
Posts: 1,325
Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, US


Mika wrote:
Wow... perpetuating the stereotype that models should be seen and not heard. The photographer isn't always the one making the decisions, you realize this, yes?

Speak your opinion. I've had horrible makeup applied by a "makeup artist" that the photographer didn't comment on - and I mean HORRIBLE. If you won't speak up, sometimes, no one else will.

It's not a matter of perpetuating a stereotype, it's a matter of explaining the chain of command. If as a model you're paying for a shoot or it's a TF* arrangement where it's been discussed beforehand that the model will have complete say over her final look then (and only then) should the model say something about the way the make-up looks if she's unhappy. Otherwise it really is your job to basically shut up and model it like you love it. Why? Because if you're being paid for the shoot, the shots are for submission, it's for a fashion show, or the make-up was already discussed by the person whose job it was to handle setting up that part of the shoot that's exactly what you agreed to do. And moreover it's (likely) what you would do (that is if you were interested in working) if you showed up for a shoot for a big name designer or photographer and the make-up was something you found distasteful. The same type of courtesy should apply no matter what the situation because at the end of the day it should all be treated like business.

OP there are times you'll hate the direction of your hair and make-up but most of the time it's not your place to say anything. You also won't always like your wardrobe since there are times the pieces won't be to your personal taste and sometimes the photographer will be extra demanding. These things don't matter in the grand scheme of things. What may look horrible out of context in a make-up mirror is likely to fabulous in a finished image and in this business while image isn't absolutely everything it counts for a whole hell of a lot. My advice is if some lipstick ends up on your teeth or a bobby pin is digging into your scalp: say something. If you're however just not enthused by purple eyebrows and a nude lip keep quiet and remember it's just make-up and it will come off after you rock the shoot smile

Aug 19 13 04:31 am  Link  Quote 
Model
Erin McDermott
Posts: 3
Charlotte, North Carolina, US


Thank you so much Philipe! (:
Aug 19 13 09:31 am  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
Makeup Hair by Dani B
Posts: 738
Seattle, Washington, US


Even if you come with blow dried hair, as has been suggested, a professional hair stylist will still wet it down and re-do it. The reason for this is that properly dried hair forms the foundation for the style and if not done properly can affect the outcome. Also any products you use when drying your own hair may not be compatible with what we need/like to use for specific styles. So yes, hair clean, but drying is not necessary if there is a professional hair stylist on set.

The only other thing I can add to what's already been said is if you will be modeling in anything that shows arms/shoulders/back/low cut/hip/butt areas skip the bra & undies or remove them several hours ahead of time to prevent lines and marks in the skin.
Aug 19 13 10:25 am  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
Rock Victorian
Posts: 142
Norfolk, Virginia, US


In addition to what has been said...

Eyebrows: please make sure your eyebrows are groomed in the days before the shoot. I've had models show up freshly tweezed or waxed and the skin is swollen -or- the makeup has some trouble adhering. It's not the ideal sanitary situation. Sure, we can get around this but just as a precaution.

Nails: please make sure these are groomed as well. Chipped polish a/o nails makes me sad.
Aug 19 13 10:57 am  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
Lucinda Reilly
Posts: 114
Saint Paul, Minnesota, US


GENTLY exfoliate your skin in the week before (including knees, elbows, hands and feet along with the face). Don't let it get flakey, but don't punish it either. I'm a big fan of the Peter Thomas Roth Unwrinkle peel pads for this. For lip care, a clean toothbrush after a shower or a bit of sugar and honey make a good scrub, and great lip balm is woth every penny.

Arrive with a fresh clean face. A lightweight oil-free moisturizer without sunscreen is wonderful.

Eat and hydrate before showing up. You don't want to get hypoglycemic during a shoot, or get makeup done with precise deep red lips and run off for a submarine sandwich right before an event (true story).

Tend to body and facial hair. Take care of peach fuzz, nose hair, and stray brows (as stated above, not the day before), and if you are a female with hairy arms, consider a wax. If the shoot has skimpy outfits, also tend to the bikini line and care for any razor bumps. If you have decided to stop all shaving, do let the client know in advance. I have had models shows up and suprise the crew with this, and sometimes it works for the shoot, but it usually doesn't for commercial work.

Remove your own eye boogers.

Put the phone away. I cannot stress this enough. Some models think that squinting at it with one eye or texting whenever I grab a new brush is okay...it really slows things down. Think of the time in the chair as time to unplug and relax, to key into the gig.

As much as a model above hated the idea, yes, it is a "seen but not heard" situation if you are booked by a client, especially on a corporate job. There were a lot of ridiculous things I wore or said while I was modeling, but that is what I was paid to do. The exception to this is, of course, your discomfort, safety, and distress. Then definitely speak up. Everybody has their role on set. Sometimes the client wants something "outlandish" or "boring". Even as a makeup artist, I don't always have complete control over makeup in the chain of command. The client determines how they want their product to be represented. It is not about personal preferences.

I also have a list from some of my old runway shows that I posted here that might be helpful: http://beingfab.blogspot.com/2012/03/so … model.html

OP, the fact that you are asking these questions is a great thing. It pays to know what is expected and to understand everyone's role on a set. Asking shows some foresight and humility. Good luck to you.
Aug 19 13 01:58 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Philipe
Posts: 5,208
Pomona, California, US


Makeup by Dani B wrote:
Even if you come with blow dried hair, as has been suggested, a professional hair stylist will still wet it down and re-do it. The reason for this is that properly dried hair forms the foundation for the style and if not done properly can affect the outcome. Also any products you use when drying your own hair may not be compatible with what we need/like to use for specific styles. So yes, hair clean, but drying is not necessary if there is a professional hair stylist on set.

I disagree on re setting the hair by making it wet..
If the hair has some product in it, when you wet it, it can make it worst. It can get gummy..

Unless its wet hair styling or the hair is getting cut.
You can re set the hair by using a warm blow dryer to blow the hair out (I've done this many times and once for makeup artist Fran├žois Nars ) or curling or flat iron.
You only wet the hair if you want to completely redo the hair style from the previous look, but shampooing is sometime recommended if too much product was used..
But in most cases the product can be brushed out gently..


I've also done hair for Joico, ISO, TIGI, MSNBC, Fox new and hair for runway shows where time is of the essence..

Also for runway, wetting the hair is bad, in between looks there is zero time to blow dry the hair and restyle the hair from scratch..
I mentioned runway because in shoots there is little time as well..

Aug 19 13 03:21 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Philipe
Posts: 5,208
Pomona, California, US


Rock Victorian  wrote:
In addition to what has been said...

Eyebrows: please make sure your eyebrows are groomed in the days before the shoot. I've had models show up freshly tweezed or waxed and the skin is swollen -or- the makeup has some trouble adhering. It's not the ideal sanitary situation. Sure, we can get around this but just as a precaution.

Nails: please make sure these are groomed as well. Chipped polish a/o nails makes me sad.

Yes eye brows..

Aug 19 13 03:27 pm  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
Ash Mathews
Posts: 251
Los Angeles, California, US


My ideal model shows up early or on time. Has clean hair, preferably dry because having to dry it will eat up too much time. Clean face with some moisturizer on. Eyebrows are groomed, and nails are polish free and clean or with a neutral color on them.

Be friendly and open minded. I don't mind when models tell me what works on them makeup wise, for the most part they know what they are talking about. I've learned some great tricks from models. The key is to communicate and come up with something that works for everyone and makes them look their best.
Aug 19 13 04:02 pm  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
Makeup Hair by Dani B
Posts: 738
Seattle, Washington, US


Philipe wrote:

I disagree on re setting the hair by making it wet..
If the hair has some product in it, when you wet it, it can make it worst. It can get gummy..

Unless its wet hair styling or the hair is getting cut.
You can re set the hair by using a warm blow dryer to blow the hair out (I've done this many times and once for makeup artist Fran├žois Nars ) or curling or flat iron.
You only wet the hair if you want to completely redo the hair style from the previous look, but shampooing is sometime recommended if too much product was used..
But in most cases the product can be brushed out gently..


I've also done hair for Joico, ISO, TIGI, MSNBC, Fox new and hair for runway shows where time is of the essence..

Also for runway, wetting the hair is bad, in between looks there is zero time to blow dry the hair and restyle the hair from scratch..
I mentioned runway because in shoots there is little time as well..

You are correct in that there is more than one way to re-style hair. Certainly heat styling tools can accomplish this if the model's hair is lightly styled, clean, with minimal product to begin with. There may be no choice if a model has multiple jobs or we have quick changes in theater. A light misting of water/appropriate product/etc. can also be a part of this, which is what I was referring to as I thought it was obvious that wetting down hair thoroughly is not usually the best option. Yes, thoroughly wetting hair that has a great deal of product in it makes a mess. As hair stylists, we know this. My goal was not to educate stylists, but to answer the OP's question. The OP is a model asking for advice on how to come to a shoot, and air dried, clean hair is preferable to a model attempting her own version of a blow out imo, whether she's coming in for print, film or runway. You say you have worked with tight time constraints, as have I, so then you know that in a pinch we can make almost anything work if we have to. I was simply stating what my preference was and clean, product-free, naturally/air dried hair is my go to.

Aug 19 13 05:38 pm  Link  Quote 
guide forum
Makeup Artist
Mary
Posts: 7,154
Coronado, California, US


I agree with most of whats been posted... If you're paying, explain what you want...If not don't say a word...It's the client who decides makeup looks...If an artist was hired the artist was hired for the same reason you were...the client wanted what that person had to offer.

I get perturbed when a model tries to tell me what they want when they were hired by the same person I was...You never want to work with an artist that's perturbed...trust me on that one smile

and of course... come prepared
clean face
groomed brows
NO SPRAY TANNING
put the cell phone away while you're in the chair

That's my advice... Good luck
Aug 20 13 01:18 am  Link  Quote 
Body Painter
BodyPainter Rich
Posts: 17,899
Sacramento, California, US


Mika wrote:
Wow... perpetuating the stereotype that models should be seen and not heard. The photographer isn't always the one making the decisions, you realize this, yes?

Speak your opinion. I've had horrible makeup applied by a "makeup artist" that the photographer didn't comment on - and I mean HORRIBLE. If you won't speak up, sometimes, no one else will.

Mika,

By now if you are still reading this thread you have heard from many professional working MUA's and Stylists that back me up on my comment.

But I wish to make clear that I do not wish to perpetuate a stereotype at all. On a professional shoot, where everyone is working for a paying client, the only opinion that matters is that of the client or the person that the client has put in charge (art director, photographer, whomever).

People who give unwanted opinions are not likely to be seen on set when the next job rolls around. And more than once I have seen models looking anxiously at themselves in the mirror. I ask, "are you worried about how you are going to look?" they reply "yes". I say "Wait until you see the final image". They usually thank me by the time they see that final image.

When I am doing a trade shoot, I am more than glad to hear the models input, but I have to say that when I am dealing with a young model who has a year or two of experience and a photographer or MUA who has 10-20 years of experience, the model usually does not get as much in the way of input.

Aug 20 13 07:46 am  Link  Quote 
Makeup Artist
boy does makeup
Posts: 227
Atlanta, Georgia, US


I agree with most of what was said, clean face/moisturized/etc.

I will touch on the 'do as your told' ideal... as someone who has experience BEING a model and being MARRIED to a model, also as a photographer AND makeup artist... this really is your best bet.

I can say from personal experience... what you like/think looks good, may NOT be what the creative team has in mind. - recently, I did a shoot where the model was unaware of the makeup design ahead of time, I painted her face pink and her FOREHEAD purple. She HAD to feel that I was putting eyeshadow on her forehead, but she didn't ask questions. When I was done, and showed her the final look... she kinda freaked "OMG my forehead is purple" of course it ended up being her MOST POPULAR shoot (mine too) and everyone was happy in the end. She didn't ask questions, or argue, and even after the initial shock... she simply said "I'm just the model, if you like it, I like it"

just my 2 cents.

-B.D.M.
Aug 20 13 02:57 pm  Link  Quote 
  Search   Reply



main | browse | casting/travel | forums | shout box | help | advertising | contests | share | join the mayhem

more modelmayhem on: | | | edu

©2006-2014 ModelMayhem.com. All Rights Reserved.
MODEL MAYHEM is a registered trademark.
Toggle Worksafe Mode: Off | On
Terms | Privacy | Careers