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first123
Photographer
Leighthenubian
Posts: 2,748
Toronto, Ontario, Canada


SteeringWinds wrote:
Maybe check the photographer's web site (if they have one) to see if they are skilled.  If so, relax and get loaded.  If not, it might be worth taking the gear - the bride might thank you later. 

I just did bridal shots for a friend who had a photography disaster at her wedding.  The photog they hired was a friend of the groom's mother, and the photos from the wedding were apparently dreadful.

So the bride reached out to me, explained what happened, and asked if I could do her bridal shots.  I did, and now everyone is happy.

ya ya...if I have a g-note for every photographer that has a "how I came to my friends rescue" bs story..I would take next year off and travel Europe again.

Sep 11 13 08:31 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Photo Artistic Savannah
Posts: 14
Savannah, Georgia, US


Stephen Fletcher wrote:
Nothing wrong with taking photos of family and friends, but for Gods sake stay out of the way of the Pro getting paid to do it.   Let them do their job.

Yep!

Sep 11 13 09:28 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Tom Nguyen Studio
Posts: 411
Shakopee, Minnesota, US


If one has the urge to bring their big DSLR rig to their friends' wedding, then one has the secret urge to outdo the hired wedding photographer.  I say just leave it at home or bring a point-n-shoot (or use your phone).
Sep 11 13 09:55 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
T-Dog Studio
Posts: 358
Nashville, Tennessee, US


I take my kit to all weddings but it stays in the car until after the ceremony and formal reception.
Sep 13 13 03:30 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
vinnysphotos
Posts: 58
MASPETH, New York, US


I went to a good friends wedding with my camera and flash only. I stayed out of the way of the paid photographer and got all the shots of family and friends (most came in from over seas) the paid guy didn't take.

Also I didn't spend much time adjusting the photos so the bride was posting them the next day. By the time she got the proofs (60+ days later) she was already thinking of the baby she just found out she was having.

Guess who's doing the Christening? LOL
Sep 13 13 08:39 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Leighthenubian
Posts: 2,748
Toronto, Ontario, Canada


vinnysphotos wrote:
I went to a good friends wedding with my camera and flash only. I stayed out of the way of the paid photographer and got all the shots of family and friends (most came in from over seas) the paid guy didn't take.

Also I didn't spend much time adjusting the photos so the bride was posting them the next day. By the time she got the proofs (60+ days later) she was already thinking of the baby she just found out she was having.

Guess who's doing the Christening? LOL

"ya ya...if I have a g-note for every photographer that has a "how I came to my friends rescue" bs story..I would take next year off and travel Europe again."

Sep 13 13 09:01 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Good Egg Productions
Posts: 15,100
Orlando, Florida, US


T-Dog Studio wrote:
I take my kit to all weddings but it stays in the car until after the ceremony and formal reception.

Then why do you take it at all??

To shoot pictures of the staff cleaning up the venue after people go home?

Sep 13 13 09:11 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
MMDesign
Posts: 18,647
Louisville, Kentucky, US


http://www.blurb.com/books/2459699-chris-davie

I did and made them a blurb book. It ended up being their favorite gift.
Sep 13 13 10:44 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
MC Photo
Posts: 4,144
New York, New York, US


I had a really positive and interesting experience bringing my camera to a friend's wedding. It was a three day event - a dinner hosted by each family on the two nights before, then the regular ceremony and dinner in the third day.

They didn't have a hired pro for the first two nights, so another guest and I both shot the only photos from those events. The pros for the ceremony were $6k for a team and did good work with natural light, but were weak with a flash. The entire ceremony was speed lights on camera shot straight forward. It was reasonably well done for that approach, but they just didn't look right.

Their reception photos sucked. It was a very low light situation and they didn't shoot it right, plus they were only hired to shoot an hour of the ceremony. I shot with a single manual focus prime, and my reception photos killed theirs.


While my lighting for the low light was better, the main reason I got better photos was because I had a relationship with the guests from the previous two days. One family was Irish and the other was Indian, so while everyone was very friendly there was still an unspoken awkward culture clash. Even though I'd only gotten to know a few of the bride's side of the family, they'd seen me with a camera for the past two days, and they had a very different reaction to me shooting them than to the hired shooters. In addition, once they left, the brides father pulled me around to various groups and asked for specific shots, which he didn't do with the pros. I'm not sure how aware he was that he was interacting with me differently from them, but the end result is that I got photos that they couldn't have gotten because of who they were.


I think it's worth bringing a camera if you think you'll be inclined to shoot and if it's a situation that you're comfortable in technically.
Sep 13 13 11:37 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
T-Dog Studio
Posts: 358
Nashville, Tennessee, US


Good Egg Productions wrote:

Then why do you take it at all??

To shoot pictures of the staff cleaning up the venue after people go home?

Nope, I shoot the fun parts, dancing drinking.  After everyone loosens up and starts really enjoying.  Don't be a Dick.

Sep 14 13 03:29 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Leighthenubian
Posts: 2,748
Toronto, Ontario, Canada


T-Dog Studio wrote:

Nope, I shoot the fun parts, dancing drinking.  After everyone loosens up and starts really enjoying.  Don't be a Dick.

He had a fair point...why bother taking your pro gear at all...isn't the point of you being there just to celebrate as a guest/friend/family?

Why not bring a point and shoot with you like everyone else?

Sep 14 13 06:25 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Menai Media
Posts: 137
Bangor, Wales, United Kingdom


Marky, Why not take your camera with you and shoot an alternative album comprising of informal images including candid stuff. Then give them the images to the couple as a very personal wedding gift?
Sep 15 13 04:14 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
fussgangerfoto
Posts: 149
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, US


Menai Media wrote:
Marky, Why not take your camera with you and shoot an alternative album comprising of informal images including candid stuff. Then give them the images to the couple as a very personal wedding gift?

Took the works right out of my mouth. Earlier this summer, my son (who's a wedding photographer himself) got married, and yes, I brought my camera too. I stayed away from the two paid photographers who still had to deal with every aunt and uncle trying to get the same posed shots they were trying to get. I can't tell you how many times they had to retake a shot or remind the wedding party to look at them and not all the other cameras.

I stayed in the background and took candids (see below). I also took photos of the paid photographers in action and sent them the files for their website/blog. Stay out of the way and you'll be fine.

http://photos.modelmayhem.com/photos/130902/07/5224a44fdc00e_m.jpg

Sep 15 13 08:03 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Engage Photography
Posts: 30
Denver, Colorado, US


DJR Pictures wrote:
I had it happen at my wedding and have even done it at friend's weddings. Only do it if you really want to...Some just choose to enjoy the event. But if you really want to.................

Don't go nuts...Only take pictures at the opportune times as opposed to all the time.

Don't show up with a big fancy rig...Bring a body and a 50mm or something so you still blend in with the crowd.

Always ensure you're nowhere near the photographer they paid or in the line of the photographer they paid. Professional courtesy is everything. I've shot several weddings and there's always an "Uncle Bob" who's got a D3000 and SB600 that thinks he's a pro because he's got an SLR...He's always getting in the way or in the shot. DON'T be that guy.

Otherwise, if you can get some great pictures that they weren't expecting, they'll probably appreciate it.

This 100%. The weddings I've shot there is typically someone trying to shadow you or stepping in front of your shot or being in the background of what you're trying to shoot. Don't be that guy. Just imagine being in your studio trying to photograph a model and you've got someone immediately behind you or shooting on the side or even wandering into the picture because they want a better angle.

Sep 15 13 08:14 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Fred Ackerman
Posts: 266
Fort Lauderdale, Florida, US


I take my small point & shoot and always stay out of the professional's way.. Unlike years back almost everyone these days has a camera with them. My iPhone is my backup smile
Sep 15 13 09:23 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
NatLight Studios
Posts: 793
Menlo Park, California, US


vinnysphotos wrote:
I went to a good friends wedding with my camera and flash only. I stayed out of the way of the paid photographer and got all the shots of family and friends (most came in from over seas) the paid guy didn't take.

Also I didn't spend much time adjusting the photos so the bride was posting them the next day. By the time she got the proofs (60+ days later) she was already thinking of the baby she just found out she was having.

Guess who's doing the Christening? LOL
Leighthenubian wrote:
"ya ya...if I have a g-note for every photographer that has a "how I came to my friends rescue" bs story..I would take next year off and travel Europe again."

It is interesting that some MM'ers, who apparently consider themselves superb wedding photographers, can't seem to imagine that the family might greatly appreciate having a skilled family member or dear friend bring a quality camera to a family wedding.  You must be incredibly insecure about your own skills, and similarly incapable of recognizing that you will, always, miss shots that have meaning for the bride and groom as well as the family.   What is particularly amusing is that some of these same MM'ers babble on about how guests should help the bride and groom "enjoy their day", apparently without ever recognizing that having a friend capture a special moment is one of the very best ways of helping the bride and groom enjoy their day.  And, by the way, a lot of those special moments occur when the paid shooter isn't around or isn't paying attention.  Getting images to the family very promptly is also a great plus, but apparently beyond the comprehension of the MM wedding photographers who have such amazingly inflated opinions of their own importance. 

It gets even more amusing, to me at least, when I see a post like the one above, where someone's ego is so hugely out of control that the only answer he can give, repeatedly, is "bs,..."  Great.  At least I know someone I would never hire or recommend for any purpose, and that is helpful information.  Perhaps some photographers should stop hoping for someone to give them g-notes, and instead sell their gear so that they can take a year off, travel around, and get their heads straight about what a wedding is really all about.  Here's a hint:  It isn't about them.

Sep 15 13 02:10 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
1k-words-photograpy
Posts: 321
Leesburg, Virginia, US


NatLight Studios wrote:

It is interesting that some MM'ers, who apparently consider themselves superb wedding photographers, can't seem to imagine that the family might greatly appreciate having a skilled family member or dear friend bring a quality camera to a family wedding.  You must be incredibly insecure about your own skills, and similarly incapable of recognizing that you will, always, miss shots that have meaning for the bride and groom as well as the family.   What is particularly amusing is that some of these same MM'ers babble on about how guests should help the bride and groom "enjoy their day", apparently without ever recognizing that having a friend capture a special moment is one of the very best ways of helping the bride and groom enjoy their day.  And, by the way, a lot of those special moments occur when the paid shooter isn't around or isn't paying attention.  Getting images to the family very promptly is also a great plus, but apparently beyond the comprehension of the MM wedding photographers who have such amazingly inflated opinions of their own importance. 

It gets even more amusing, to me at least, when I see a post like the one above, where someone's ego is so hugely out of control that the only answer he can give, repeatedly, is "bs,..."  Great.  At least I know someone I would never hire or recommend for any purpose, and that is helpful information.  Perhaps some photographers should stop hoping for someone to give them g-notes, and instead sell their gear so that they can take a year off, travel around, and get their heads straight about what a wedding is really all about.  Here's a hint:  It isn't about them.

You complete me....

Sep 15 13 02:17 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Good Egg Productions
Posts: 15,100
Orlando, Florida, US


NatLight Studios wrote:

vinnysphotos wrote:
I went to a good friends wedding with my camera and flash only. I stayed out of the way of the paid photographer and got all the shots of family and friends (most came in from over seas) the paid guy didn't take.

Also I didn't spend much time adjusting the photos so the bride was posting them the next day. By the time she got the proofs (60+ days later) she was already thinking of the baby she just found out she was having.

Guess who's doing the Christening? LOL

It is interesting that some MM'ers, who apparently consider themselves superb wedding photographers, can't seem to imagine that the family might greatly appreciate having a skilled family member or dear friend bring a quality camera to a family wedding.  You must be incredibly insecure about your own skills, and similarly incapable of recognizing that you will, always, miss shots that have meaning for the bride and groom as well as the family.   What is particularly amusing is that some of these same MM'ers babble on about how guests should help the bride and groom "enjoy their day", apparently without ever recognizing that having a friend capture a special moment is one of the very best ways of helping the bride and groom enjoy their day.  And, by the way, a lot of those special moments occur when the paid shooter isn't around or isn't paying attention.  Getting images to the family very promptly is also a great plus, but apparently beyond the comprehension of the MM wedding photographers who have such amazingly inflated opinions of their own importance. 

It gets even more amusing, to me at least, when I see a post like the one above, where someone's ego is so hugely out of control that the only answer he can give, repeatedly, is "bs,..."  Great.  At least I know someone I would never hire or recommend for any purpose, and that is helpful information.  Perhaps some photographers should stop hoping for someone to give them g-notes, and instead sell their gear so that they can take a year off, travel around, and get their heads straight about what a wedding is really all about.  Here's a hint:  It isn't about them.

And then there's the people who complain about the person with 1 and 1/2 weddings under their belt that are charging $600 for a wedding.

The people hiring the $600 wedding photographer could be the same people who are encouraging their photographer friends to bring their rigs so that they are sure to have everything that a $600 wedding photographer won't get.

Look... Professionals charge what they charge because they don't screw up. 

Let's say I get married.  I don't want a single person bringing their Canon 1Dx with bracket and Gary Fong sphere taking photos.  I want them to have a drink, dance and have a good time with friends and family.  Much like I don't want my friend who plays guitar to bring his guitar and play a few songs just in case the DJ sucks.

I don't want my friend who makes the most awesome cupcakes to bring 40 gourmet cupcakes just in case the wedding cake isn't delicious.

If I wanted all of that, I'd have hired these friends to work my wedding.  I'd have paid them a fair price.  And I'd have an expectation of them.

When you are invited to go to a wedding, it's not a photo op for you as a photographer.  If these people would have wanted you to take photos at their wedding, they would have hired you to do so.

How is this so difficult for people to understand?

Or do whatever you want.  I don't care.  It's not my wedding.

Sep 15 13 03:25 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
In Balance Photography
Posts: 3,370
Boston, Massachusetts, US


I just actually worked my very first wedding yesterday (as a second shooter). It was a *long* day (and a humbling day too).

I think there we about 150 people at the wedding - and there were a lot of cameras...mostly cellphones and point and shoots, but a few digital SLRs too. So there was a *lot* of photography going on.

As a second shooter, I was tasked with shooting whatever looked interesting, so I had the opportunity to just kind of kick back and observe people. One of the things that I noticed was how the people reacted when being photographed by someone they had a relationship with, versus being photographed by either myself or main photographer.

It was clear that the photograph that a guest took was special in its own right - at the very least, it was a souvenir of something they did themselves, at its best, it captured part of a relationship between that guest and the person being photographed.

At the time I thought about photographing the people photographing each other - but I didn't. It seemed like it would be an invasion - like if I were on a job and someone was photographing me. In retrospect I think I should have captured those moments because it really about the relationship between the two guests - the photography was just an incidental.

Those guests, with their cameras, were *creating* moments, and to some extent that makes what I was doing seem a bit insignificant...

So, for me personally, if I ever get to go to another wedding as a guest again, I'll be leaving anything bigger than a P&S at home, and remember that my job is to be celebrating the couple's big day and creating moments that the wedding photographer can capture.
Sep 15 13 04:53 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Leighthenubian
Posts: 2,748
Toronto, Ontario, Canada


1k-words-photograpy wrote:

You complete me....

I'm not shocked...

Sep 15 13 07:40 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Leighthenubian
Posts: 2,748
Toronto, Ontario, Canada


NatLight Studios wrote:

vinnysphotos wrote:
I went to a good friends wedding with my camera and flash only. I stayed out of the way of the paid photographer and got all the shots of family and friends (most came in from over seas) the paid guy didn't take.

Also I didn't spend much time adjusting the photos so the bride was posting them the next day. By the time she got the proofs (60+ days later) she was already thinking of the baby she just found out she was having.

Guess who's doing the Christening? LOL

It is interesting that some MM'ers, who apparently consider themselves superb wedding photographers, can't seem to imagine that the family might greatly appreciate having a skilled family member or dear friend bring a quality camera to a family wedding.  You must be incredibly insecure about your own skills, and similarly incapable of recognizing that you will, always, miss shots that have meaning for the bride and groom as well as the family.   What is particularly amusing is that some of these same MM'ers babble on about how guests should help the bride and groom "enjoy their day", apparently without ever recognizing that having a friend capture a special moment is one of the very best ways of helping the bride and groom enjoy their day.  And, by the way, a lot of those special moments occur when the paid shooter isn't around or isn't paying attention.  Getting images to the family very promptly is also a great plus, but apparently beyond the comprehension of the MM wedding photographers who have such amazingly inflated opinions of their own importance. 

It gets even more amusing, to me at least, when I see a post like the one above, where someone's ego is so hugely out of control that the only answer he can give, repeatedly, is "bs,..."  Great.  At least I know someone I would never hire or recommend for any purpose, and that is helpful information.  Perhaps some photographers should stop hoping for someone to give them g-notes, and instead sell their gear so that they can take a year off, travel around, and get their heads straight about what a wedding is really all about.  Here's a hint:  It isn't about them.

I think some people are just looking for any reason to shoot their cameras...probably too lazy to work up a decent gig for themselves so they horn in on someone else's action.

Sep 15 13 07:41 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Chris Rifkin
Posts: 24,412
Tampa, Florida, US


Good Egg Productions wrote:

Then why do you take it at all??

To shoot pictures of the staff cleaning up the venue after people go home?

Well...now there is an entirely new marked you just discovered there......

Sep 16 13 07:50 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Chris Rifkin
Posts: 24,412
Tampa, Florida, US


I leave the gear home....
I have a few family members who would want me to shoot future weddings for free if I showed up with my gear nd took pics(which is a shame because I want to bring it just to shoot with no flash in these conditions just to push myself in my photography)..
now if I wasn't on the road and busy with work as much as I am(or even better,retired after winning a powerball)I would consider...but then I would probably not either as I would be taking food out of the mouth of a professional who makes his living doing this
people don't understand sometimes how much work goes into a wedding,especially the planning with the bridal party on shots....and the days and weeks of editing....
Sep 16 13 07:58 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
D-Light
Posts: 548
Newcastle, Limerick, Ireland


DJR Pictures wrote:
I had it happen at my wedding and have even done it at friend's weddings. Only do it if you really want to...Some just choose to enjoy the event. But if you really want to.................

Don't go nuts...Only take pictures at the opportune times as opposed to all the time.

Don't show up with a big fancy rig...Bring a body and a 50mm or something so you still blend in with the crowd.

Always ensure you're nowhere near the photographer they paid or in the line of the photographer they paid. Professional courtesy is everything. I've shot several weddings and there's always an "Uncle Bob" who's got a D3000 and SB600 that thinks he's a pro because he's got an SLR...He's always getting in the way or in the shot. DON'T be that guy.

Otherwise, if you can get some great pictures that they weren't expecting, they'll probably appreciate it.

+1

Sep 16 13 08:49 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Leighthenubian
Posts: 2,748
Toronto, Ontario, Canada


Chris Rifkin wrote:
I would be taking food out of the mouth of a professional who makes his living doing this
people don't understand sometimes how much work goes into a wedding,especially the planning with the bridal party on shots....and the days and weeks of editing....

And this is what the engineers and others with day jobs that do not have the title "PHOTOGRAPHER" on their business cards. It's nothing to them to devalue the work of others by giving away images and time for free because they have a source of income not related to photography.

They justify it by saying crap like "Why should a pro be worried" etc. At least you have a good understanding of "WHY NOT" to bring your gear to a wedding where there is a clearly defined professional hired to document it.

Sep 16 13 09:30 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
C h a r l e s D
Posts: 9,304
Los Angeles, California, US


I've never minded any other photographer when shooting a wedding.  (14 weddings)

The hired professional photographer(s) has never had a problem with me shooting as I like, after asking. (7 weddings)

I just don't see the problem, unless you want to resell the photos over and over and over again.  I just have the person paying pay a flat amount, and they get what they ordered.  I'm getting paid my full amount, and couldn't care less who else is shooting.  I guess the other professionals that were hired when I was a guest at a wedding felt the same way.
Sep 16 13 09:42 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
1k-words-photograpy
Posts: 321
Leesburg, Virginia, US


Leighthenubian wrote:

And this is what the engineers and others with day jobs that do not have the title "PHOTOGRAPHER" on their business cards. It's nothing to them to devalue the work of others by giving away images and time for free because they have a source of income not related to photography.

They justify it by saying crap like "Why should a pro be worried" etc. At least you have a good understanding of "WHY NOT" to bring your gear to a wedding where there is a clearly defined professional hired to document it.

You make tons of assumptions.

Has it ever occurred to you that some people actually like taking pictures. And that just because they do doesn't mean they are out to get you, or anyone?

If the only way you can sell a picture to a bride is if there are no other photographers maybe you should get one of these day jobs you assume everyone has.

Sep 16 13 01:25 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
TheStarvingArtist
Posts: 27
Jefferson City, Missouri, US


I take my camera everywhere. If I attend a wedding I take pictures just like any other guest would. During the ceremony I get an aisle seat or stand in the back, and take pictures from that one spot. If I want some posed shots I wait until the hired photographers are shooting something else and take a couple. On those occasions I do not sell any pics, but I send my favorites to the Bride and Groom on their facebook site just like any of their friends would do. And like others have commented, Often they tell me my pictures are better than the people they hired. Which means they will recommend me to their friends.
Sep 16 13 01:42 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Peach Jones
Posts: 6,222
Champaign, Illinois, US


Yingwah Productions wrote:
Lot of wedding photographers say they have a clause in contract that says they're the only ones allowed to shoot. But SLRs are so cheap 1 in 8 guests at a wedding have one.
  I would say try your best not to get in official photogs way. Like don't be actively trying to position yourself to get portfolio worthy images or shoot over their shoulder when they're doing the group formals, thats annoying.
  When I bring my camera I'm mostly shooting other guests, friends/family I haven't seen in awhile etc

This used to be an absolute no-no for anyone else to show up with a camera. I have even herd of some photographers threatening to leave if other people were taking shots. In this day and age.....where digital cameras are so prevalent......it doesn't seem to be as big of an issue. Still I feel I am disrespecting the "Paid Photographer" if I show up with my camera. It almost seems to be saying, "we don't trust you, so going to get all the stuff you can't".  That's why I leave my camera at home

Sep 16 13 01:52 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Leighthenubian
Posts: 2,748
Toronto, Ontario, Canada


TheStarvingArtist wrote:
I take my camera everywhere. If I attend a wedding I take pictures just like any other guest would. During the ceremony I get an aisle seat or stand in the back, and take pictures from that one spot. If I want some posed shots I wait until the hired photographers are shooting something else and take a couple. On those occasions I do not sell any pics, but I send my favorites to the Bride and Groom on their facebook site just like any of their friends would do. And like others have commented, Often they tell me my pictures are better than the people they hired. Which means they will recommend me to their friends.

You know what makes these fishing stories so amazing?

The way none of the armchair photographers ever claim anything other than "the couple loved my pictures more than the ones from the paid photographer"...

I think I would fall off my chair if someone like you confessed to making WORSE images than the paid photographers...cause you know, we just charge to show up and take sh*t pictures.

Sep 16 13 01:57 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
V Jeero
Posts: 146
Saratoga Springs, Utah, US


I never would.  My equipment is insured but if I'm not there being paid to document the event, or giving photography as a gift (I don't do this often), my big guns stay at home and my canon elph comes out.

I work lots of weddings, and do not appreciate someone else with a big camera, big camera bag, trying to show up and outdo me.  It has to do with the attitude as well.  I'm extremely happy to help pose couples (while I'm on the clock) and arrange pictures other people are taking if they look like they need help (think unflattering made flattering).  But I'm the one the bride and the bride's mom hired to be there and make sure the important moments are documented. 

My .02
Sep 16 13 02:00 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Leighthenubian
Posts: 2,748
Toronto, Ontario, Canada


1k-words-photograpy wrote:

You make tons of assumptions.

Has it ever occurred to you that some people actually like taking pictures. And that just because they do doesn't mean they are out to get you, or anyone?

If the only way you can sell a picture to a bride is if there are no other photographers maybe you should get one of these day jobs you assume everyone has.

Well I may not be a highly paid engineer..like my father, or a business analyst like my mother...or a financial analyst like my wife but I'm compensated very well for my wedding work. I haven't felt threatened one single time because some guy thinks it was a really really good idea to turn up at a celebration of marriage kitted out with their "pro" gear.

Since you didn't get the message, here it is again:

It has nothing to do with feeling threatened, it's the lack of respect for someone who makes wedding photography their business. If you like taking pictures so much, make it a career, send out some casting calls..work up your own gig and don't intrude on others.

Or maybe just go to the wedding as a guest, enjoy yourself and entertain your friends and family instead of slinging your "pro" camera.

Sep 16 13 02:03 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
V Jeero
Posts: 146
Saratoga Springs, Utah, US


Good Egg Productions wrote:

And then there's the people who complain about the person with 1 and 1/2 weddings under their belt that are charging $600 for a wedding.

The people hiring the $600 wedding photographer could be the same people who are encouraging their photographer friends to bring their rigs so that they are sure to have everything that a $600 wedding photographer won't get.

Look... Professionals charge what they charge because they don't screw up. 

Let's say I get married.  I don't want a single person bringing their Canon 1Dx with bracket and Gary Fong sphere taking photos.  I want them to have a drink, dance and have a good time with friends and family.  Much like I don't want my friend who plays guitar to bring his guitar and play a few songs just in case the DJ sucks.

I don't want my friend who makes the most awesome cupcakes to bring 40 gourmet cupcakes just in case the wedding cake isn't delicious.

If I wanted all of that, I'd have hired these friends to work my wedding.  I'd have paid them a fair price.  And I'd have an expectation of them.

When you are invited to go to a wedding, it's not a photo op for you as a photographer.  If these people would have wanted you to take photos at their wedding, they would have hired you to do so.

How is this so difficult for people to understand?

Or do whatever you want.  I don't care.  It's not my wedding.

well, freakin, said sir!

Sep 16 13 02:03 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
1k-words-photograpy
Posts: 321
Leesburg, Virginia, US


Leighthenubian wrote:

Well I may not be a highly paid engineer..like my father, or a business analyst like my mother...or a financial analyst like my wife but I'm compensated very well for my wedding work. I haven't felt threatened one single time because some guy thinks it was a really really good idea to turn up at a celebration of marriage kitted out with their "pro" gear.

Since you didn't get the message, here it is again:

It has nothing to do with feeling threatened, it's the lack of respect for someone who makes wedding photography their business. If you like taking pictures so much, make it a career, send out some casting calls..work up your own gig and don't intrude on others.

Or maybe just go to the wedding as a guest, enjoy yourself and entertain your friends and family instead of slinging your "pro" camera.

I think I owe everyone the respect allotted to the basic state of being a human being. I think I owe everyone the basic respect of not interfering with their business. I disagree that respect extends to me not being able to use my camera or that me me using my camera in any way interferes with their business.

Sep 16 13 02:15 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Peach Jones
Posts: 6,222
Champaign, Illinois, US


1k-words-photograpy wrote:

I think I owe everyone the respect allotted to the basic state of being a human being. I think I owe everyone the basic respect of not interfering with their business. I disagree that respect extends to me not being able to use my camera or that me me using my camera in any way interferes with their business.

You don't know that. Many wedding photographers sell packages and prints a la carte. I have done this too. There sales may go down significantly if there are other people there taking wedding photos and giving them to the bride and family for free. Hence, it interferes with the photographer's business.

Sep 16 13 02:21 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Leighthenubian
Posts: 2,748
Toronto, Ontario, Canada


1k-words-photograpy wrote:

I think I owe everyone the respect allotted to the basic state of being a human being. I think I owe everyone the basic respect of not interfering with their business. I disagree that respect extends to me not being able to use my camera or that me me using my camera in any way interferes with their business.

Oh my...I understood you perfectly in your several posts on the matter. Reading and comprehension was a requirement for university.

I was pointing out your sense of entitlement. Because you can take pictures, you feel as though you should do so wherever and whenever you wish. Without a care towards the larger picture..if you will pardon the pun.

Non-Photographer guests can be forgiven for interfering with a working man/woman. We should hope people who know better will show more respect.

Sep 16 13 02:41 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Good Egg Productions
Posts: 15,100
Orlando, Florida, US


TheStarvingArtist wrote:
I take my camera everywhere. If I attend a wedding I take pictures just like any other guest would. During the ceremony I get an aisle seat or stand in the back, and take pictures from that one spot. If I want some posed shots I wait until the hired photographers are shooting something else and take a couple. On those occasions I do not sell any pics, but I send my favorites to the Bride and Groom on their facebook site just like any of their friends would do. And like others have commented, Often they tell me my pictures are better than the people they hired. Which means they will recommend me to their friends.

Getting a few good photos at a wedding does not qualify you to shoot a wedding.

Weddings are difficult to get right and you don't get to do them over. Good wedding photographers are expensive and worth every penny. They come prepared with experience, the knowledge of where to be and when and can blast through 40 formal photos in 30 minutes with 40 different lineups.

They are also equipped with backups for any catastrophic event that may put Uncle Steve down for the count.

So best of luck on those recommendations because you took a few photos that your friends like.
Or maybe they were just being polite because you're friends.
Friends sometimes do that.

Sep 16 13 04:21 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Marky
Posts: 630
Grays, England, United Kingdom


Thank you all for your advise. I read and took on board your opinions.
In the end I decided to take my camera and use my 85mm, I didn't move around like your 'uncle Bob' but kept to my seat. After the ceremony the photographer took the formals and then leaded the bride and groom off to to take posed shots at a castle. I was asked by the bride if I wanted to join but I said no. I done this as I didn't want to cause any friction with the paid photographer! When they came back  the photographer had finished and left.
In my eyes the wedding had only just began and after a conversation with the bride and my cousin we agreed on my fiancee and me photographing in the evening (of course I was going to be drinking and socialising at the same time). We ended up getting some great pics and didn't pee off the photographer in doing so. I've not passed them on yet but feel I'll get a positive feed back from them as the photographer wasn't photographing the guests in his photos.
Sep 18 13 04:15 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
AVD AlphaDuctions
Posts: 10,524
Gatineau, Quebec, Canada


The F-Stop wrote:
Nothing wrong as long as you don't ask the bride to take her clothes off.

I can't believe there weren't more comments about this.

since when is it in the official shoot list for the wedding photographer and thus their exclusive domain?

I think anyone is allowed to ask smile

Sep 18 13 05:10 pm  Link  Quote 
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