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Photographer
Photo by Darryl Cobb Jr
Posts: 33
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, US


This really isn't a question of which camera is better but about upgrading now versuses later. I currently own a Nikon D80 with a Kit 18-105mm VR II and 50mm 1.8D. I shoot a lot of low light concert pics. Here's the question:

Do I upgrade to a D7000

or

Do I buy 17-50mm 2.8 (Tamron), 28-75mm 2.8 (Sigma) or 70-200mm  2.8 (Tamron). 2 of the 3. Budget is a factor in my decision which is why i'm bringing this question to the experienced set of folks here.

Thanks.
Sep 11 13 07:35 pm  Link  Quote 
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Photographer
GPS Studio Services
Posts: 34,652
San Francisco, California, US


That is a much tougher question than you think.  Normally one opts for better glass before a new body.  The problem is that your camera was made before Nikon adopted the Expeed processor.  When that happened, image quality improved dramatically as did low light performance. 

The D7000 has been replaced with the D7100, but it is still two generations newer than your D80 is.  Put another way, my D300s was far better than my D200 and the D7000 bested the image quality of my D300s as well. 

So for my money, I'd buy a D7000 body, and if you had the budget, one of your lens choices.  In this case though, I would say body before lens.
Sep 11 13 07:40 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
DougBPhoto
Posts: 37,569
Portland, Oregon, US


Photo by Darryl Cobb Jr wrote:
This really isn't a question of which camera is better but about upgrading now versuses later. I currently own a Nikon D80 with a Kit 18-105mm VR II and 50mm 1.8D. I shoot a lot of low light concert pics. Here's the question:

Do I upgrade to a D7000

or

Do I buy 17-50mm 2.8 (Tamron), 28-75mm 2.8 (Sigma) or 70-200mm  2.8 (Tamron). 2 of the 3. Budget is a factor in my decision which is why i'm bringing this question to the experienced set of folks here.

Thanks.

The D80 is pretty ancient, and ESPECIALLY if you are shooting low light, the improved high ISO performance of even a used D7000 will be a huge step forward for you.

If budget was an issue, I'd consider a fixed 35mm or 28mm or something like that that also gives you a fast lens, and will help you out in the low light better than the f2.8's and should cost less.

Sep 11 13 07:50 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Photo by Darryl Cobb Jr
Posts: 33
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, US


GPS Studio Services wrote:
That is a much tougher question than you think.  Normally one opts for better glass before a new body.  The problem is that your camera was made before Nikon adopted the Expeed processor.  When that happened, image quality improved dramatically as did low light performance. 

The D7000 has been replaced with the D7100, but it is still two generations newer than your D80 is.  Put another way, my D300s was far better than my D200 and the D7000 bested the image quality of my D300s as well. 

So for my money, I'd buy a D7000 body, and if you had the budget, one of your lens choices.  In this case though, I would say body before lens.

Thanks for this. And it is VERY tough decision because every article I read was saying glass, glass, glass but didn't take into consideration my camera.

Sep 11 13 07:56 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Photo by Darryl Cobb Jr
Posts: 33
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, US


DougBPhoto wrote:

The D80 is pretty ancient, and ESPECIALLY if you are shooting low light, the improved high ISO performance of even a used D7000 will be a huge step forward for you.

If budget was an issue, I'd consider a fixed 35mm or 28mm or something like that that also gives you a fast lens, and will help you out in the low light better than the f2.8's and should cost less.

Thanks. I think I will do one of the smaller primes along with the D7000. Thanks again.

Sep 11 13 07:56 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
T-D-L
Posts: 10,119
Los Angeles, California, US


Photo by Darryl Cobb Jr wrote:

Thanks. I think I will do one of the smaller primes along with the D7000. Thanks again.

D7000 and 35mm 1.8 was a pretty sweet combo back when I was shooting Nikon.  If you're not opposed to refurbs you can find the body for ~$700 online.

Sep 11 13 08:31 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Photo by Darryl Cobb Jr
Posts: 33
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, US


T-D-L wrote:

D7000 and 35mm 1.8 was a pretty sweet combo back when I was shooting Nikon.  If you're not opposed to refurbs you can find the body for ~$700 online.

"

I have the 50mm now. What would make you choose 35mm over 28mm?

Sep 11 13 08:35 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Stephen Fletcher
Posts: 7,034
Norman, Oklahoma, US


I lost a D80 in a burglary and went and bought two to replace it.  Does everything I need to do.
Sep 11 13 08:36 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Images by MR
Posts: 7,484
Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada


I've still got my D80 & it's a piece of crap compaired to my D7000. 

Get the D7000 & the 50 1.8G.
Sep 11 13 08:41 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
RSH-Photography
Posts: 290
Austin, Texas, US


I traded in my D80 for a D7000 last year. The D7000 is a major advancement in quality. And consider this since you're thinking about more glass. The D80 (unlike the D7000) has no dust removal system, meaning every time you change a lens you're risking getting dust on the sensor. I'd go with the D7000 and 35mm f1.8. I have that combination plus a 80-200mm zoom that I used with the D80.
Sep 11 13 08:47 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Image Works Photography
Posts: 2,890
Orlando, Florida, US


Sorry but I was disappointed with the D7000 big time. I went back to using my D300s as a back up. I can't say enough how many misfocus and wb nightmares I had with the camera. Perhaps it was a dud but then again- I did some research online and I wasn't alone.
Sep 11 13 08:57 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
T-D-L
Posts: 10,119
Los Angeles, California, US


Photo by Darryl Cobb Jr wrote:

"

I have the 50mm now. What would make you choose 35mm over 28mm?

If you can afford the 28mm then that'd be another option...just depends on how wide you want to go.  On crop bodies I was rarely at 28mm with my zoom, but was frequently around 35-40mm...so I opted for a 35 (and now a 40mm).  Used that lens almost exclusively for about 6 months, and it covered maybe 90% of my needs for my style of shooting at the time.  Even now, while I appreciate a fast 50mm (and I used one exclusively for a year a while back, so I know they're capable lenses), I find that I'd rather shoot wider if possible on DX, and 35mm gives me a close approximation of 50mm on a FF body which was my ideal setup back in school.  28-35 is the ideal on a crop body for me though, YMMV.

That being said, if the 28mm and a D7000 is in your budget though, there's all sorts of other options....ranging from really upgrading the body (D600 and your 50mm would be the way I'd go), to D7100, to D7000 and say the Sigma 35mm 1.4.  All depends on what's most important to you for your style of shooting though.

Sep 11 13 08:58 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
WCR3
Posts: 969
Houston, Texas, US


Photo by Darryl Cobb Jr wrote:

Thanks for this. And it is VERY tough decision because every article I read was saying glass, glass, glass but didn't take into consideration my camera.

Just one man's opinion, but I think "glass, glass, glass" may be an outmoded concept. Good glass is good, but good bodies keep getting better. These days there are substantial improvements in digital cameras coming at a rapid pace. As pointed out above, a couple of generations make a very big difference in quality

Sep 11 13 09:49 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Select Models
Posts: 35,357
Upland, California, US


Photo by Darryl Cobb Jr wrote:
This really isn't a question of which camera is better but about upgrading now versuses later. I currently own a Nikon D80 with a Kit 18-105mm VR II and 50mm 1.8D. I shoot a lot of low light concert pics. Here's the question:

Do I upgrade to a D7000

or

Do I buy 17-50mm 2.8 (Tamron), 28-75mm 2.8 (Sigma) or 70-200mm  2.8 (Tamron). 2 of the 3. Budget is a factor in my decision which is why i'm bringing this question to the experienced set of folks here.

Thanks.

Dump the D80... pass on getting all those after-market garbage lenses... keep your 18-105 ED-VR and the 50mm and pickup the D7100.  Later on get the new Nikon 70-200 F4 Nanocoat... lightweight and razor sharp.  The D7100 has an amazing low-noise sensor for your concert pics... borat

Sep 11 13 10:27 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Yingwah Productions
Posts: 1,341
New York, New York, US


The D5200 should have a better sensor and improved low light and cheaper than D7000 and both have the same focus system. I think the flip out LCD on the D52000 would be more useful.
Sep 11 13 10:35 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Photo by Darryl Cobb Jr
Posts: 33
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, US


Yingwah Productions wrote:
The D5200 should have a better sensor and improved low light and cheaper than D7000 and both have the same focus system. I think the flip out LCD on the D52000 would be more useful.

Yes but it doesn't have the second wheel on it. My primary gig is shooting an open mic event that is on a stage. Having the wheel to change the shutter speed is a godsend. I'm fine looking through the viewfinder though.

Thanks for the input.

Sep 11 13 10:45 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Photo by Darryl Cobb Jr
Posts: 33
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, US


Select Models wrote:

Dump the D80... pass on getting all those after-market garbage lenses... keep your 18-105 ED-VR and the 50mm and pickup the D7100.  Later on get the new Nikon 70-200 F4 Nanocoat... lightweight and razor sharp.  The D7100 has an amazing low-noise sensor for your concert pics... borat

I really do want the D7100 but I wouldn't want to sacrifice having a back up body to do it which is what my Nikon D80 is going to be. As my skill grows adn jobs start to pay more, budget will increase but for now. I'm feeding my art and passion. Thanks for the feedback on this.

Sep 11 13 10:53 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Photos by Lorrin
Posts: 6,912
Eugene, Oregon, US


Regarding the D5200

Check out the new Auto ISO settings.

If you  shoot without compensation or with a standard amount - this might solve the second wheel problem.  Although the 50 will not focus on this body.

I agree on a new body.

I think the missing wheel can be worked around by reprogramming the camera.  Maybe by using the Fn button.

or by  changing the function of the wheel.
Sep 11 13 11:03 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
T-D-L
Posts: 10,119
Los Angeles, California, US


The 50mm 1.8D won't AF on the D5200....dunno how important that is to the OP though...
Sep 12 13 12:15 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Select Models
Posts: 35,357
Upland, California, US


T-D-L wrote:
The 50mm 1.8D won't AF on the D5200....dunno how important that is to the OP though...

Good point... and another good reason to pickup the D7100 with the focus motor... PLUS... it's got Nikon's best auto focus system... that tried and true 51 point AF is a sure winner... works great in low light... borat

Sep 12 13 12:18 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
DaveDavis
Posts: 4,998
Roseville, California, US


Select Models wrote:
Good point... and another good reason to pickup the D7100 with the focus motor... PLUS... it's got Nikon's best auto focus system... that tried and true 51 point AF is a sure winner... works great in low light... borat

Oh Yeah!!!

Sep 12 13 12:38 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Mark C Smith
Posts: 733
Toronto, Ontario, Canada


I still have my D80 as a backup and walkaround but I'm looking forward to replacing it soon with something better, as somebody else said, Nikon made big improvements to their image processing with the D7000.
Sep 12 13 12:51 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Chuckarelei
Posts: 9,269
Seattle, Washington, US


D80 has CCD sensor. D7000 uses CMOS sensor. Big difference in higher ISO performance.
Sep 12 13 12:58 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Will_DB
Posts: 246
Derby, England, United Kingdom


Select Models wrote:
pass on getting all those after-market garbage lenses...

The Tamron 17-50 and 28-75 are NOT garbage lenses.

Re the OP's question - the jump from D80 to the sweet 16mp EXMOR sensor in the D7000 will be very noticeable! But you still need fast lenses. A fast prime makes sense (but you already have the 50/1.8), but don't discount fast zooms either if you can save up for one.

Sep 12 13 01:59 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
DBIphotography Toronto
Posts: 3,143
Toronto, Ontario, Canada


GreatMomentsPhotography wrote:
Sorry but I was disappointed with the D7000 big time. I went back to using my D300s as a back up. I can't say enough how many misfocus and wb nightmares I had with the camera. Perhaps it was a dud but then again- I did some research online and I wasn't alone.

There's a known White Balance issue affecting jpegs. That means, if you convert in Cnx/2 or Vnx/2 you'll get the same issue - but converting in C1/LR?/etc and you're groovy smile  I prefer my D90 over a D300s any day. The D300 blows away the D90 as a work-camera, since it's somewhat weather-resistant/takes CF Cards/doesn't have those goofy PCS' in the way/etc. The D90 has a higher Image Quality, a much higher ISO-ceiling (787 vs 997), better DR......... http://snapsort.com/compare/Nikon_D300S-vs-Nikon_D90  I gave mine to my Makeup Artist a while back, but once in a while I get bored and take a few shots with it still yikes  (And remember, the D7000 replaced the D90 - and smokes the pants off it in every way!) This is one image I made with it back in 2011 (18+): http://www.modelmayhem.com/portfolio/pic/31847751

Will_DB wrote:

The Tamron 17-50 and 28-75 are NOT garbage lenses.

Re the OP's question - the jump from D80 to the sweet 16mp EXMOR sensor in the D7000 will be very noticeable! But you still need fast lenses. A fast prime makes sense (but you already have the 50/1.8), but don't discount fast zooms either if you can save up for one.

When I was shooting crop-sensor, I wouldn't shoot with anything but fast primes. It's already bad enough that the sensors are smaller and cause a slight loss-of-detail when shooting models/fine details from a distance, but since they have less photosites to take light why give them less than you can with a prime? I think I only had a pair of 1.8's, a 50 & an 85. I just traded-in that 85 towards a new and better one, a G-model (AF-S). When I gave my old D90 to my MUA to learn on, I gave her my 50mm f/1.4D until I came across a nifty fifty for a steal tongue

I once had the Tamrom 28-75mm f/2.8, and for the cost ($500 after taxes) it was superb. Then I shot nudes indoors in a small room, and at f/3.2 with the model's arse to one side of the frame the lenses' distortion made her rump about 6x the size of her head yikes  I traded it in towards my Nikkor 24-70 f/2.8 the next morning borat

IMHO alone;

Ðanny
DBIphotography Toronto (Blog On Site) 
DBImagery Toronto (Website)

"Will you look back on life and say, "I wish I had," or "I'm glad I did"?"
~ Zig Ziglar

Sep 13 13 02:48 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Don A Long
Posts: 2,625
Jacksonville, Florida, US


I upgraded a couple years back from a D80 to the D7000.  My son was playing Lacrosse at night and the D80 just couldn't do the job with an f4 lens.  The D7000 was a big difference in low-light.  Plenty of other features I liked as well.
Sep 13 13 07:00 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Yingwah Productions
Posts: 1,341
New York, New York, US


Photo by Darryl Cobb Jr wrote:

Yes but it doesn't have the second wheel on it. My primary gig is shooting an open mic event that is on a stage. Having the wheel to change the shutter speed is a godsend. I'm fine looking through the viewfinder though.

Thanks for the input.

If you're shooting manual, you just press a button or push in the wheel to switch between shutter and aperture. Once its set you won't need to change it.
Nikon's 24mp sensor is much better image wise and high iso wise and I hate D7000 controls compared to their pro bodies. I would take the better image and the swivel LCD to take more creative shots and play with video. Mount it on a monopod with a remote trigger to raise it up for aerial shots. Having unique shots in your port will grow your business more than anything.

Sep 13 13 09:59 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
DBIphotography Toronto
Posts: 3,143
Toronto, Ontario, Canada


Yingwah Productions wrote:
If you're shooting manual, you just press a button or push in the wheel to switch between shutter and aperture. Once its set you won't need to change it.
Nikon's 24mp sensor is much better image wise and high iso wise and I hate D7000 controls compared to their pro bodies. I would take the better image and the swivel LCD to take more creative shots and play with video. Mount it on a monopod with a remote trigger to raise it up for aerial shots. Having unique shots in your port will grow your business more than anything.

I didn't realize he was into nautical photography; he only mentioned shooting events! That'd make for interesting portfolio additions.............

Sep 13 13 10:38 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Bbarnesphotography
Posts: 3
Plano, Texas, US


I shoot with a D7000 with most of the time. I use the Nikon 35mm 1.8, 50mm 1.8, 18-105mm kit lens and a Tamron 28-75mm 2.8 along with a few others and absolutely love it. Great low light and awesome auto-focus. The wireless off camera flash is great function as-well. The video mode isn't bad either. I haven't had any issues with it at all. Just update the firm ware and keep on shooting.
Sep 13 13 10:54 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Photo by Darryl Cobb Jr
Posts: 33
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, US


Yingwah Productions wrote:

If you're shooting manual, you just press a button or push in the wheel to switch between shutter and aperture. Once its set you won't need to change it.
Nikon's 24mp sensor is much better image wise and high iso wise and I hate D7000 controls compared to their pro bodies. I would take the better image and the swivel LCD to take more creative shots and play with video. Mount it on a monopod with a remote trigger to raise it up for aerial shots. Having unique shots in your port will grow your business more than anything.

While all you said is true, it's just not how I feel comfortable working. The d5200 just doesn't fit with what I do. Once I get the d7000 or d7100 (if budget as able to accommodate it), the next step is some additional glass and eventually a full frame camera. When I shoot my spoken word event, I wouldn't want the liability if my camera fell on someone. However, as a secondary camera, it is attractive. Thanks for the input.

Sep 13 13 05:15 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
K I C K H A M
Posts: 14,495
Los Angeles, California, US


I am so obsessed with my d7000 that I would highly recommend it.

I'm working with one lens right now, aside from when I borrow, and am saving up to get new glass as I go. (Working with only a 50 right now)
Sep 13 13 05:18 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
London Fog
Posts: 6,627
London, England, United Kingdom


K I C K H A M wrote:
I am so obsessed with my d7000 that I would highly recommend it.

I'm working with one lens right now, aside from when I borrow, and am saving up to get new glass as I go. (Working with only a 50 right now)

That's all you need, the lowly 50mm is sharp as a tack and allows for great low light shooting! I shot with my first camera for ten years with just a 50mm!

Sep 13 13 05:24 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
K I C K H A M
Posts: 14,495
Los Angeles, California, US


London Fog wrote:

That's all you need, the lowly 50mm is sharp as a tack and allows for great low light shooting! I shot with my first camera for ten years with just a 50mm!

They are my babies. If anyone tries to touch them I hiss at them.

Sep 13 13 05:26 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
London Fog
Posts: 6,627
London, England, United Kingdom


K I C K H A M wrote:

They are my babies. If anyone tries to touch them I hiss at them.

Haha, very nice babies too!

Sep 13 13 05:34 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Photo by Darryl Cobb Jr
Posts: 33
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, US


K I C K H A M wrote:
I am so obsessed with my d7000 that I would highly recommend it.

I'm working with one lens right now, aside from when I borrow, and am saving up to get new glass as I go. (Working with only a 50 right now)

As I'm learning more about photography, I'm loving the 50mm  more as well. I like it so much I seriously am considering the 1.4G but I'm hearing the 1.8G is a better lens. Is this true? Have you shot with the either?

Sep 13 13 05:52 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
K I C K H A M
Posts: 14,495
Los Angeles, California, US


Photo by Darryl Cobb Jr wrote:

As I'm learning more about photography, I'm loving the 50mm  more as well. I like it so much I seriously am considering the 1.4G but I'm hearing the 1.8G is a better lens. Is this true? Have you shot with the either?

I hear, and believe the 1.8 is much better.

But I've only shot with the 1.4, personally. It does fine for me.

Sep 13 13 06:01 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
enriquePHOTOs
Posts: 6
Dallas, Texas, US


bro i bought i d7000 for mountain biking and use the d800 for work.... save up for a full frame instead of another crop sensor if you are passionate about photography....
Sep 14 13 03:05 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Model Starr Photography
Posts: 521
Madison, Alabama, US


I own both and I have to say that this is one of the few times I'd advise someone to upgrade their body over upgrading their lenses. The d7000 gives you so much more latitude in low light situations. The high ISO performance of the D7000 is just superior in every way to the D80. You can get shots with your current lenses and the D7000 that you'd NEVER be able to get with you D80. I still think the D80 renders truer colors than the D7000 (the yellow hue drives me nuts with the D7000), but in ever other way, the D7000 is a far superior camera.
Sep 14 13 03:19 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Images by MR
Posts: 7,484
Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada


enriquePHOTOs wrote:
bro i bought i d7000 for mountain biking and use the d800 for work.... save up for a full frame instead of another crop sensor if you are passionate about photography....

So those who are shooting with a crop body aren't passionate about photography?

Sep 14 13 03:28 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
enriquePHOTOs
Posts: 6
Dallas, Texas, US


Images by MR wrote:
So those who are shooting with a crop body aren't passionate about photography?

its possible young lad, its an opinion. its a newbie camera but when its time to upgrade you might as well and save up bit more. just think about it, if you are upgrading why not upgrade to a full frame.

Sep 14 13 03:48 pm  Link  Quote 
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