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Photographer
Bold Belle
Posts: 99
Chanute, Kansas, US


Though I understand as an artist there are things to worry about. Are they serious about this? How can I trust them not screw me over? and other questions.

So I'm here asking the designers of all sorts, what would be the best way for someone wanting collaborate with you. I really would like to help other's out by getting them quality photos. I'm not the best and my learning/style is ever-evolving/continuing.

I'm wanting to know the best way to approach to leave them fully comfortable/informed in making a decision.
Sep 19 13 04:06 am  Link  Quote 
Clothing Designer
Krystell Barraza
Posts: 146
Chicago, Illinois, US


Bold Belle wrote:
Though I understand as an artist there are things to worry about. Are they serious about this? How can I trust them not screw me over? and other questions.

So I'm here asking the designers of all sorts, what would be the best way for someone wanting collaborate with you. I really would like to help other's out by getting them quality photos. I'm not the best and my learning/style is ever-evolving/continuing.

I'm wanting to know the best way to approach to leave them fully comfortable/informed in making a decision.

How can we trust you not to screw us over? Clothes get damaged, lost, and stolen at shoots all the time. And we can't monitor things ourselves if we're not on location.

But that aside, most photographers (at least the ones I have worked with so far) have taken very good care of my clothes, so that's just a worse case scenario.

When approaching someone for a shoot, I suggest being upfront about the model you're using, the concept you have in mind, and if this is a location shoot then the location you intend to photograph in. Those three elements (plus the photographer photographing) are all deal breakers for me if I don't like one of them.

Sep 19 13 05:33 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Bold Belle
Posts: 99
Chanute, Kansas, US


Krystell Barraza wrote:
How can we trust you not to screw us over? Clothes get damaged, lost, and stolen at shoots all the time. And we can't monitor things ourselves if we're not on location.

But that aside, most photographers (at least the ones I have worked with so far) have taken very good care of my clothes, so that's just a worse case scenario.

When approaching someone for a shoot, I suggest being upfront about the model you're using, the concept you have in mind, and if this is a location shoot then the location you intend to photograph in. Those three elements (plus the photographer photographing) are all deal breakers for me if I don't like one of them.

I see, well thank you very much for the information ^-^

Sep 19 13 11:50 am  Link  Quote 
Clothing Designer
Krystell Barraza
Posts: 146
Chicago, Illinois, US


Bold Belle wrote:

I see, well thank you very much for the information ^-^

Yep, no problem! smile

Sep 19 13 04:44 pm  Link  Quote 
Wardrobe Stylist
Tiffany_B
Posts: 1,325
Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, US


Bold Belle wrote:
Though I understand as an artist there are things to worry about. Are they serious about this? How can I trust them not screw me over? and other questions.

So I'm here asking the designers of all sorts, what would be the best way for someone wanting collaborate with you. I really would like to help other's out by getting them quality photos. I'm not the best and my learning/style is ever-evolving/continuing.

I'm wanting to know the best way to approach to leave them fully comfortable/informed in making a decision.

First, don't put yourself down in a public forum. It's one thing to be honest about your skill level (which is totally appreciated) and another thing to flat out say you're not the best because the truth is that when my work is being shot I want someone who's confident in what they're doing.

Second, you have to understand that with many indie designers that the samples you're shooting are literally one of a kind pieces and that's a huge deal especially if they can't be on set and you're approaching them without a stylist who'll be assisting. The truth is that while models don't mean to be, they can be hard on clothes. I can't count the number of times I've had to reiterate to a model that if she wanted to smoke she needed to 1) remove the clothes and 2) go outside. I'm also sure to specify in my emails that they can't wear white deodorant and shouldn't come in smelling of perfume. These are minor details that you have to consider. Things like stuck zippers are no big deal when it's a models own pair of jeans but it has to be dealt with very delicately when pieces are borrowed, the same goes for buttons, corset lacings and anything else that can come loose. What this means is that when you approach designers you need to emphasize that their pieces will be cared for and if necessary be prepared to explain your plan.

Third, a strong concept will often win out over a vague idea. This doesn't mean that you need to send off a storyboard but be sure to send over complete and current model stats, the number of pieces you need etc. Also be sure to indicate a location. The location is important for two reasons 1) there are some designers who'll only want there samples in a more controlled environment like a studio and 2) it may effect the terms of your agreement e.g. a designer may require you to cover dry cleaning if you want to shoot their garments in the woods where they may get dirty.

Finally, keep in mind that there will be people who say "no" and it's not the end of the world.

Good luck!

Sep 27 13 10:34 am  Link  Quote 
Clothing Designer
Wilde Hunt Corsetry
Posts: 343
Columbus, Ohio, US


Here are a few thoughts from my perspective as a designer.

1) I personally would never send any of my garments to a stylist or photographer who does not have high quality fashion photography images in their portfolio. If the person in question can't pull together a decent shoot from off-the-rack clothing, why would I lend them one-of-a-kind, custom garments that are worth a considerable amount of money? I've seen amazing images styled from only thrifted clothes, paper, or even raw fabric yardage, so I feel that cost really isn't a barrier for an individual who is truly passionate and talented.

2) I am more favorably disposed to stylists who have a Fedex number (or similar account) that I can use to send the pieces. It is a nice gesture.

3) I insist on the package being insured, in both directions. Not everyone requires this but you really need to ask each designer. Neglecting to insure can be seen as disrespectful.

4) As the others have said - I need to know who the model is, who the photographer is, shoot concept, location, MUA - and of course what the purpose is. Is it just testing, is it for an editorial (if so, do you have a pull letter?). Basically, what's in it for me? A poorly written, vague email is a mark of an amateur. If you don't have a good plan, it's unlikely the images will turn out to be usable.
Sep 30 13 04:36 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Bold Belle
Posts: 99
Chanute, Kansas, US


Tiffany_B wrote:
First, don't put yourself down in a public forum. It's one thing to be honest about your skill level (which is totally appreciated) and another thing to flat out say you're not the best because the truth is that when my work is being shot I want someone who's confident in what they're doing.

Second, you have to understand that with many indie designers that the samples you're shooting are literally one of a kind pieces and that's a huge deal especially if they can't be on set and you're approaching them without a stylist who'll be assisting. The truth is that while models don't mean to be, they can be hard on clothes. I can't count the number of times I've had to reiterate to a model that if she wanted to smoke she needed to 1) remove the clothes and 2) go outside. I'm also sure to specify in my emails that they can't wear white deodorant and shouldn't come in smelling of perfume. These are minor details that you have to consider. Things like stuck zippers are no big deal when it's a models own pair of jeans but it has to be dealt with very delicately when pieces are borrowed, the same goes for buttons, corset lacings and anything else that can come loose. What this means is that when you approach designers you need to emphasize that their pieces will be cared for and if necessary be prepared to explain your plan.

Third, a strong concept will often win out over a vague idea. This doesn't mean that you need to send off a storyboard but be sure to send over complete and current model stats, the number of pieces you need etc. Also be sure to indicate a location. The location is important for two reasons 1) there are some designers who'll only want there samples in a more controlled environment like a studio and 2) it may effect the terms of your agreement e.g. a designer may require you to cover dry cleaning if you want to shoot their garments in the woods where they may get dirty.

Finally, keep in mind that there will be people who say "no" and it's not the end of the world.

Good luck!

I understand. Thank you for the informative post ^-^

Oct 08 13 08:18 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Bold Belle
Posts: 99
Chanute, Kansas, US


Wilde Hunt Corsetry wrote:
Here are a few thoughts from my perspective as a designer.

1) I personally would never send any of my garments to a stylist or photographer who does not have high quality fashion photography images in their portfolio. If the person in question can't pull together a decent shoot from off-the-rack clothing, why would I lend them one-of-a-kind, custom garments that are worth a considerable amount of money? I've seen amazing images styled from only thrifted clothes, paper, or even raw fabric yardage, so I feel that cost really isn't a barrier for an individual who is truly passionate and talented.

2) I am more favorably disposed to stylists who have a Fedex number (or similar account) that I can use to send the pieces. It is a nice gesture.

3) I insist on the package being insured, in both directions. Not everyone requires this but you really need to ask each designer. Neglecting to insure can be seen as disrespectful.

4) As the others have said - I need to know who the model is, who the photographer is, shoot concept, location, MUA - and of course what the purpose is. Is it just testing, is it for an editorial (if so, do you have a pull letter?). Basically, what's in it for me? A poorly written, vague email is a mark of an amateur. If you don't have a good plan, it's unlikely the images will turn out to be usable.

This was very helpful. Thank you ^-^

Oct 08 13 08:20 am  Link  Quote 
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