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Forums > Digital Art and Retouching > Creating realistic wet skin Search   Reply
Retoucher
Rich Pics
Posts: 8
Belfast, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom


Hi guys, no doubt this has been touched on before.

As a retoucher who is always looking on improving technique, I was wondering if any of you had any great tips/tutorials/examples of how to create realistic wet skin.

I know the basic techniques of blurring images and adding highlights - both of which start to create a wet look but obviously by overdoing these the model will start to look like she is made from plastic.  Likewise, adding increases areas of highlight etc, the model can start look like she is christening in diamonds, rather than creating an authentic "wet" water droplet look.

I also believe that there are different kinds of "wet" look depending on whether a model is to look wet from water (where you might see water droplets etc) or wet from being sweaty or even the "wet" look created from mositurised/oiled skin.  I am interested in creating the former.

So basically what I am looking for is to create a wet, water look which seeks to highlight and smooth skin as it should look but without losing the skins texture where appropriate.

Does anyone have any tips or retouched pictures they would like to share?

PS.  Let me add that I do not like the idea of cutting and inserting individual water droplets which I have seen done.  Actually I have found drawing water droplets using a new layer set to screen and then using the eraser to part erase areas of each droplet and water lines to create quite realistic droplet and streaky water effects.

Thanks!
Nov 03 13 08:30 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Sean C
Posts: 34
Dallas, Texas, US


Tell the photographer to get it right in camera.
Nov 03 13 11:22 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Jakov Markovic
Posts: 1,128
Belgrade, Central Serbia, Serbia


To get realism in that short amount of time(couple of hours) you use either a camera, or a render. You can't get it in PS in that time, as you'll need to draw it all.
Nov 04 13 03:47 am  Link  Quote 
Retoucher
Natalia_Taffarel
Posts: 7,665
Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina


Rich Pics wrote:
I also believe that there are different kinds of "wet" look depending on whether a model is to look wet from water (where you might see water droplets etc) or wet from being sweaty or even the "wet" look created from mositurised/oiled skin.  I am interested in creating the former.

Show us.
We are not inside your head.

Nov 04 13 04:08 am  Link  Quote 
Retoucher
Rich Pics
Posts: 8
Belfast, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom


Natalia_Taffarel wrote:

Show us.
We are not inside your head.

See this link.  Be aware it contains nudity.
http://www.renderosity.com/mod/bcs/phot … 66e773.jpg

I realise this is a render but this is what I mean when I sight different examples of how skin can appear different under water, oil or sweat.  I think I tend to agree that there is a bit of a difference.

if there isn't a "quick fix", how would any of you go about achieving this result?

Finally, come someone explain what you mean about setting the camera?  I'm not sure I understand!

Thanks!

Nov 04 13 07:26 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
K E E L I N G
Posts: 39,798
Peoria, Illinois, US


Rich Pics wrote:
Finally, come someone explain what you mean about setting the camera?  I'm not sure I understand!

Thanks!

It's a tip that may or may not apply to your case.  If you are the photographer and retoucher then they mean wet the skin in real life and shoot it with proper light.. that way you don't have to "create" it in photoshop.

That advice is useless to you of course if you are a hired retoucher working with what you are given by another photographer after the fact.

It's hard to recreate this in photoshop unless your skill level is very very high....


http://24.media.tumblr.com/4092fe4330754ab9330823458b33edc9/tumblr_mvlbj4zlik1s0vzwmo1_1280.jpg

Nov 04 13 07:30 am  Link  Quote 
Retoucher
Natalia_Taffarel
Posts: 7,665
Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina


Rich Pics wrote:
PS.  Let me add that I do not like the idea of cutting and inserting individual water droplets which I have seen done.  Actually I have found drawing water droplets using a new layer set to screen and then using the eraser to part erase areas of each droplet and water lines to create quite realistic droplet and streaky water effects.

Thanks!

Or a stock image with drops on black.

http://www.studiobased.com/drops.png

That's how I'd do it.

Why DONT you like that idea?

It looks realistic

Nov 04 13 09:04 am  Link  Quote 
Retoucher
Rich Pics
Posts: 8
Belfast, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom


Natalia_Taffarel wrote:
Or a stock image with drops on black.

http://www.studiobased.com/drops.png

That's how I'd do it.

Why DONT you like that idea?

It looks realistic

Did I say I didn't like that idea?  I haven't checked to see if I did - sorry in any case!

Yes that does work well given your example.  Did you take that from the black and white image the previous poster used?

I have tried a stock image before now.  Maybe it is my inexperience but when I have tried to place them on the model, they don't look realistic.  They even begin to look less like water droplets that the ones I attempt to drop from scratch!  Now that I think about it, it could be do with the fact that the stock image was using droplets on a flat face and the key to making them realistic is to have them "run" and rest to the shape of the models body.  that would be a trickier art I imagine.

Any yes, regarding the camera, I didn't pick up on the obvious-ness of what folks were saying.  Anyhow, the answer is yes, I am only the retoucher and not the photographer.

Thanks for feedback so far.

Nov 05 13 11:58 am  Link  Quote 
Retoucher
Rich Pics
Posts: 8
Belfast, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom


K E E L I N G wrote:
It's hard to recreate this in photoshop unless your skill level is very very high....


http://24.media.tumblr.com/4092fe4330754ab9330823458b33edc9/tumblr_mvlbj4zlik1s0vzwmo1_1280.jpg

Did you create this image to look wet?  it's incredibly good.  What were the steps you took, if it is not too long for you to explain!

Nov 05 13 11:59 am  Link  Quote 
Retoucher
GK Retouching
Posts: 367
Denver, Colorado, US


I would try finding a good water drop image, doing a channel selection (usually blue or green works in that case), apply image to work out any unnecessary background. Once you have the droplets you want, create a duplicate layer of the image, copy it then paste it. That will give you a sheer image of the original. Then it's a matter of creating a mask and changing the blend mode.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mVvnZncUIUY

That's a good tutorial on how to do the method I mentioned. Skip to about five minutes if you want to get right to it.
Nov 05 13 02:52 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
NothingIsRealButTheGirl
Posts: 33,235
Los Angeles, California, US


Get the drops on gray and you can overlay.
Nov 05 13 07:03 pm  Link  Quote 
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