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Digital Artist
umutyildiz0
Posts: 60
Ankara, Ankara, Turkey


What techniques are you using to sharpen the image? How can visible skin textures/pures?
Nov 06 13 04:28 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Randy Henderson Images
Posts: 772
Springfield, Missouri, US


I use Adobe Raw.  I find an area with a lot of detail, and zoom way up.  On the sharpening tab, pull the sharpening slider up until it "snaps" into focus (sorry, that's the best way I can describe it).

Now you have introduced noise into the image, so grab the luminence slider, and slowly pull it up until the noise is controlled.
Nov 06 13 04:37 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Jakov Markovic
Posts: 954
Belgrade, Central Serbia, Serbia


High pass.
Nov 06 13 11:55 am  Link  Quote 
Retoucher
Mike Needham Retouching
Posts: 348
Cheltenham, England, United Kingdom


I do a low radius split and then clip a brightness/contrast adj. layer to it and bump the contrast to suit whatever feature I want sharpened and then rinse and repeat for areas that I want selectively sharpened.
Nov 06 13 02:57 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Berghammer
Posts: 500
Seattle, Washington, US


Most of the time just high pass with a wide radius, softlight, invert mask, soft brush, and paint to desired effect. This is after finishing with all of the curves adjustments and such, I'm sure there are much more complex industry-standard ways of going about it.
Nov 06 13 10:26 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
NSFW
Posts: 95
Saint Louis, Missouri, US


By default, when I open a photo in Adobe Camera Raw, +50 sharpening is added. I have recently begun using High Pass to bring out skin texture in the TIFF file. I don't do final sharpening in the TIFF working file but in the final JPEG. For an 800-pixel wide JPEG, I usually add 50-150 sharpening using the Unsharp Mask.

Sometimes, for some reason facial skin shows more texture than skin elsewhere on the body, and occasionally that's too much texture. For my current avatar I added +100 sharpening with the Unsharp Mask, used a white layer mask with a black brush at 20% opacity to reduce the effect of sharpening on the facial skin with no reduction in sharpening on the lips, eyes and body skin.
Nov 06 13 10:49 pm  Link  Quote 
Retoucher
AKMac
Posts: 290
London, England, United Kingdom


Most of the time I get what I want from USM.
Nov 06 13 11:13 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Faze1 photography
Posts: 554
Lawndale, California, US


Depends on the image and the output. I shoot pretty sharp images from start. High pass and/or Lab. The difficult part is finding a balance of how much to use for me. I mask and select areas on certain images but over all those are the two I use.
Nov 07 13 01:28 am  Link  Quote 
Digital Artist
umutyildiz0
Posts: 60
Ankara, Ankara, Turkey


THANKS!
Nov 07 13 03:34 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Ronald N. Tan
Posts: 2,624
Los Angeles, California, US


Sifu Robert Randall taught me a small trick about "sharpening the Black channel" when doing Custom CMYK conversion. This technique was more covered in detail in Mr. Margulis' CMYK Photoshop book. Like all tools, you need to to use the right tool for the job. The Black-channel sharpening is useful when wanting to bring out hair details or any details that are most prominently remain in the Black (K) channel.
Nov 07 13 06:06 pm  Link  Quote 
Digital Artist
Tulack13
Posts: 15
Albuquerque, New Mexico, US


If somebody like Margulis method and want to save some time, here is four Luts.

Light
Medium
Heavy
And Maximum K channel from CMYK.

https://app.box.com/s/61unrqy2ujs3x7aoifkg
Nov 08 13 03:36 pm  Link  Quote 
Retoucher
Natalia_Taffarel
Posts: 7,218
Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina


umutyildiz0 wrote:
What techniques are you using to sharpen the image? How can visible skin textures/pures?

Just in case... not everything is photoshop.
This is raw - no sharpening

http://www.studiobased.com/raw_con.png

If you don't lose the texture, it should be there in the end.

If you don't have that texture, it doesn't matter HOW you sharpen it, the final won't look the same.

Just in case, since I've been asked this question and it turned out the light in their original was flat, they used the wrong lens and cropped the image like 60% to get that frame. It's not going to happen.

Nov 09 13 07:09 am  Link  Quote 
Retoucher
RON IMAGES EDITED
Posts: 472
Miami, Florida, US


HP with or without a level layer clipped is one of my favorite.  But it depends on what you are aiming for, you can use just sharpen or unsharp mask for example.
Nov 11 13 12:30 pm  Link  Quote 
Retoucher
Abdel Kebdani
Posts: 34
Rabat, Rabat-Salé-Zammour-Zaer, Morocco


AKMac wrote:
Most of the time I get what I want from USM.

What do you mean by USM, please ?

Nov 11 13 06:58 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Jerry Bennett
Posts: 2,187
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, US


Abdel Kebdani wrote:

What do you mean by USM, please ?

Unsharp Mask. One of the sharpening settings in PhotoShop.

Nov 11 13 10:43 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Jerry Bennett
Posts: 2,187
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, US


I do a frequency split at a small radius. Dupe the high freq layer. Desaturate it. Then use the "blend if" sliders to pull the sharpening off the hard edges. If I shot with my very sharp Tamron, I'll set that layer to softlight. If I shot with my Nikon kit lens or my other zoom, I'll set it to one of the harder blend modes, such as linear. Adjust opacity and mask to taste.
Nov 11 13 10:49 pm  Link  Quote 
Retoucher
Five Retouching
Posts: 51
Des Moines, Iowa, US


I generally use a high pass filter, mask it, and then paint in where I want it.
Nov 13 13 07:41 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Silver Mirage
Posts: 1,522
Plainview, Texas, US


I generally do USM on a duplicate layer with transparency at about 80%. Adjust USM for best result, then fine tune with transparency and masking. (For USM I use a high amount and low radius -- generally about 400 amount and 0.6 radius.

If I can't get it with USM I'll go to high pass.

For problem skin I retouch the really bad spots then make a dupe layer and use surface blur -- I put in too much blur the turn down the layer transparency until I get back a somewhat natural texture coming through, then mask hair, eyes, etc. Then I can put a USM layer over this.
Nov 13 13 08:01 am  Link  Quote 
Retoucher
Peano
Posts: 4,106
Lynchburg, Virginia, US


Pretty often I use USM with an edge mask, like this:

http://img545.imageshack.us/img545/3431/zf3g.jpg

Also, usually (it always depends on the image) I'll start with a very small radius -- 0.2 or 0.3 px -- and gradually increase it until it's too much, then back off a notch. I rarely get above 0.5 px. Also, I always sharpen on a smart object so I can re-adjust as needed and have two masks to work with.

I also use Topaz Detail quite a bit, again depending on the image. I have a photographer client who shoots a lot of birds. Topaz is great for bringing out fine detail in feathers. (It also is nice for enhancing skin texture that's a bit soft.)

http://img203.imageshack.us/img203/6991/rdmm.jpg

PS -- Of course I usually do some sharpening in ACR before moving into Photoshop. The masking feature is nice. Too bad you can't save that mask as an alpha channel.
Nov 13 13 08:12 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Mask Photo
Posts: 1,371
Fremont, California, US


Jerry Bennett wrote:
I do a frequency split at a small radius. Dupe the high freq layer. Desaturate it. Then use the "blend if" sliders to pull the sharpening off the hard edges. If I shot with my very sharp Tamron, I'll set that layer to softlight. If I shot with my Nikon kit lens or my other zoom, I'll set it to one of the harder blend modes, such as linear. Adjust opacity and mask to taste.

im going to have to look into that. I use frequency split for sharpening, but haven't thought about blend if. Sounds nice, as I often have to go below what I think is proper to get rid of crunchiness.

Nov 22 13 10:21 am  Link  Quote 
Retoucher
LightFeatherRetouch
Posts: 350
Prague, Prague, Czech Republic


Mask Photo wrote:
im going to have to look into that. I use frequency split for sharpening, but haven't thought about blend if. Sounds nice, as I often have to go below what I think is proper to get rid of crunchiness.

I like it too, clipping the pure whites and pure blacks helps get rid of excesses. Is is well described by Ron Bigelow, google it.

It works better however using the clipping mask over the HF layer (described by someone above already), than reducing the opacity of LF, with a curves layer or contrast (I prefer curves, to slow down on the edges).

The best sharpening technique however is a macro lens, on a tripod. It is never the same when I use the camera in hands... difference is visible especially when you resize the image.

Nov 23 13 07:02 am  Link  Quote 
Retoucher
Mike Needham Retouching
Posts: 348
Cheltenham, England, United Kingdom


LightFeatherRetouch wrote:
(I prefer curves, to slow down on the edges).

Haven't tried curves, I know it's going to be the next thing I experiment with. Thanks for the idea.

Nov 24 13 11:36 am  Link  Quote 
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