Forums > Hair, Makeup & Styling > Airbrush gun for body painting

Body Painter

Lady Painte

Posts: 15

Honolulu, Hawaii, US

Ok so I've been searching for over 3 hours now to find out more specifics on guns and seeing as how I'm not in a position to go and try any out I gotta ask. I know that Lisa has said that a larger tip is better for more coverage but is the .6 mm of the eclipse hp-bcs too big?

I mean I want some versatility so i can do larger details but I'm not hoping to do fine details through the a.b. I would however like to work with foundations... would the hp-bcs be too large for that?

Nov 23 09 05:02 am Link

Makeup Artist

Prodigy Artistry

Posts: 1

Washington, District of Columbia, US

no it wont. what brand. hit me.

Nov 23 09 05:19 am Link

Body Painter

Lady Painte

Posts: 15

Honolulu, Hawaii, US

oh i was looking at the iwata eclipse smile

Nov 23 09 05:59 am Link

Body Painter

Tiffany David

Posts: 35

Bradenton, Florida, US

Iwata eclispe is an extremely durable airbrush gun. You will enjoy it.

Nov 23 09 07:54 am Link

Body Painter

Lisa Berczel

Posts: 3998

Corona, California, US

A bottom feed airbrush is NOT recommended for foundation.
Use a top/gravity feed.

Expect to have more than one airbrush in your kit, if you want to body paint.

1) The Eclipse HP BCS is fine for medium coverage. You won't be able to do super details... NOT because of the size of the tip, but because it is a bottom feed. You don't want to go above 15-ish psi.
2) Tip size can become an issue for certain products - like thinned water base liquid body paints - for .2mm gravity feed airbrushes that are very common in foundation airbrushes. The pigment size of the not-designed-for-airbrush body paints is just too large.
3) I often get traditional artists who want to use a micron. Um. no, not gonna happen.
4) Thin lines in airbrush are commonly accomplished working at higher psi with thinner paint. You DO NOT want to see an air dent in the skin when you're airbrushing. If you do, you're too close or to high a PSI.
5) Be prepared to use a regular paint brush for details. This is not an all-or-nothing proposition.

Nov 23 09 09:24 am Link

Body Painter

BodyPainter Rich

Posts: 17933

Sacramento, California, US

Lisa is dead on (as usual), but you CAN get a color cup attachment that nestles in next to the side of your eclipse and allows you to get close in for details. However, it takes a bit of practice to get used to and filling it all the way up is inviting a makeup spill. If you can only get one brush to start with, an eclipse will do MOST of what you want it to do, and then you can expand from there. But again, as Lisa pointed out...keeping hand brushes and sponges handy is not a bad idea.

Nov 23 09 09:45 am Link

Body Painter

Lisa Berczel

Posts: 3998

Corona, California, US

smile Rich.

Another issue I see with traditional artists new to body paint....

DO NOT REMOVE THE AIR CAP to get better detail.

Yes, this makes for a finer line, but you now have an very pointy exposed needle about in VERY close proximity to skin.

Models fidget way to much for this to ever be a safe practice.

Nov 23 09 09:48 am Link

Makeup Artist

Faces by SAM

Posts: 270

Woodbridge, Virginia, US

what's the best for something like airbrush tanning?

Nov 23 09 12:07 pm Link

Body Painter

Lady Painte

Posts: 15

Honolulu, Hawaii, US

Lisa Berczel wrote:
A bottom feed airbrush is NOT recommended for foundation.
Use a top/gravity feed.

Expect to have more than one airbrush in your kit, if you want to body paint.

1) The Eclipse HP BCS is fine for medium coverage. You won't be able to do super details... NOT because of the size of the tip, but because it is a bottom feed. You don't want to go above 15-ish psi.
2) Tip size can become an issue for certain products - like thinned water base liquid body paints - for .2mm gravity feed airbrushes that are very common in foundation airbrushes. The pigment size of the not-designed-for-airbrush body paints is just too large.
3) I often get traditional artists who want to use a micron. Um. no, not gonna happen.
4) Thin lines in airbrush are commonly accomplished working at higher psi with thinner paint. You DO NOT want to see an air dent in the skin when you're airbrushing. If you do, you're too close or to high a PSI.
5) Be prepared to use a regular paint brush for details. This is not an all-or-nothing proposition.

So what types of airbrushes would you recommend for an air brush body paint kit and what do you use the different types for?

1. So from what I remember from reading in the forums is that you want at least 30 psi to do body painting for the large coverage... What kind of gun would you use for the larger coverage? I thought the bottom feed was good for that?

2. So would you recommend a smaller size top feed like a .2 for foundations and detaiils.... but only with pigments made for airbrush? And you could *potentially* use not-made-for-airbrush liquid cosmetics through a larger tip like the .6 of the hp-bcs?

3. Whats a micron? smile

4. And if i don't get a thin enough line without denting the skin then i need a smaller size tip? is that correct?

5. You know it's funny I actually prefer the look of the combination of hand paint with the air brush... it gives it a nice dimension to it.

And i saw that they sell different tip sizes.... can you put a smaller tip on the hp-bcs than a .6?

.....and what does one use for air tanning? I would think the hp-bsc would be good for that?

thanks you guys so much! I'd give yall hugs if i could smile

Nov 23 09 11:44 pm Link

Body Painter

BodyPainter Rich

Posts: 17933

Sacramento, California, US

Lisa Berczel wrote:
smile Rich.

Another issue I see with traditional artists new to body paint....

DO NOT REMOVE THE AIR CAP to get better detail.

Yes, this makes for a finer line, but you now have an very pointy exposed needle about in VERY close proximity to skin.

Models fidget way to much for this to ever be a safe practice.

No kidding. I had to actually stop using my Vegas all together because that needle protrudes just a FRACTION of an inch. FOr temp tatts with stencils, it's fine...but I won't risk it for freehand.

Nov 24 09 07:37 am Link

Body Painter

Mythical Ink

Posts: 448

Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

ok, i know this is an old thread but I'm bumping it because I'd really like to know what's good for getting fast full coverage, mostly for under-painting. I have a couple of .3 top feed double action airbrushes which are great for the details that I'm doing at the moment but anything full body is of course taking forever.

Does anyone have a recommendation for size and type of airbrush gun (specs or brands) for just covering large areas? Would single action be appropriate or stick to double action for more versatility?

Thanks in advance.

Feb 25 10 09:50 am Link

Body Painter

BodyPainter Rich

Posts: 17933

Sacramento, California, US

I don't have a brand or model to refer you to (Lisa could probably help)...but what you need is an HVLP (High Volume Low Pressure) spray gun. Not a true airbrush usually, but capable of spraying large volumes of makeup at safe low pressures.

Feb 25 10 03:32 pm Link

Body Painter

Lisa Berczel

Posts: 3998

Corona, California, US

Yep.

For large coverage, I opt for a a Spray Gun - or Touchup gun.

Many can be adapted with an Iwata G-6 fitting to accept "fast blast" bottles.

I can paint a full body a solid color in under 20 minutes this way.

You MUST have a compressor that can handle the increased CFM required by a Spray Gun.
If the compressor is a smaller unit for face and "regular" bodypaint, I will "outshoot" it with a spray gun - even though the PSI is the same.

I've had a $15 Harbor Freight touch up gun dubbed "Purple People Eater" in my kit. It is a mainstay. A more expensive spray gun sprays a better pattern.

I'm not a fan of a product like the Iwata G-6 - it atomizes the paint which can dry mid-air.

Feb 25 10 03:49 pm Link

Makeup Artist

KatrinaMUA

Posts: 2

Royal Oak, Michigan, US

Hi everyone!

So I'm going to have my first body paint job (I'm a makeup artist). After reading your posts, I came to the conclusion that I would rather have to buy a new equipment or they might be a chance that I can use my own.
I own a regular iwata airbrush compressor + gun (makeup) and Deluxe Turbine Compressor with 10ft Hose and HVLP Spray Gun (airbrush tanning).

The question is: can I use my tanning equipment to do the paint job?
It's a whole body project, I basically have to spray models entire body to match it with cars body color (automotive industry gig). Just to mention, the color should be metallic if that makes any difference or concerns.

I will really appreciate your help! smile

Mar 22 13 10:40 am Link

Body Painter

Lisa Berczel

Posts: 3998

Corona, California, US

Short answer.... Yes. But.....

I have bodypainted with HVLP as well as touch up guns and it is overkill.

You REALLY have to be certain that the sprayer's tip size is large enough for the body paint and that you've got the correct PSI. Too small a fluid nozzle or too high a pressure can over-atomize the bodypaint to the point that the paint dries BEFORE it hits the skin. Conversely, a large tip will "spat" paint as opposed to atomizing it which can lead to a very heavy application.

You will be applying a lot of product FAST - model's core temperature will Drop Like a Rock.

Expect a LOT of over spray.

Suggest you consider investing in a bottom feed airbrush OR a $15 Harbor Freight touch up gun.

Metallic doesn't make a difference - other than they tend to not be as opaque as regular colors. Best color pay-off is to layer a solid color base with a metallic 2nd coat.

Mar 22 13 11:48 am Link

Body Painter

Sweet Loretta

Posts: 235

Sacramento, California, US

I've kept been trying to figure out what under painting was!
Brrrrr is what I really think when looking to cover a model so quickly.
Full coverage so quick is sometimes called for but there are indeed tricks and things to consider. Do note what Lisa writes about coverage and volume and do keep your model in mind.

Mar 25 13 08:31 am Link

Makeup Artist

KatrinaMUA

Posts: 2

Royal Oak, Michigan, US

Thank you so much for the help!!! I appreciate a lot big_smile

Apr 02 13 07:54 am Link

Makeup Artist

Cynthia Lauran

Posts: 8

Ventura, California, US

Everyone's input here is so valuable...I would be soo happy to have some sound advice as I am getting ready to invest in my first airbrush and I want to make the very best choice.  My ideal set up will do make-up, tanning and occasional tattoo, with water, silicone or alchohol based make-up...keeping in mind that my business is entirely mobile so I need it to be fairly light-weight and as quiet as possible.  Thank you!

Apr 20 13 11:33 pm Link