Forums > Off-Topic Discussion > What's the most beautiful photographed movie?

Model

Babalon Salome

Posts: 3499

Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany

I agree with many of the above, so I will only list a few I haven't seen mentioned:

300
Bram Stoker's Dracula
Casino
Black Swan
25th Hour

Jun 14 13 06:14 am Link

Model

Model Sarah

Posts: 39290

Columbus, Ohio, US

Adam J Caldwell wrote:
My favorites are strange choices. Both by the same director

Pi

&

Requiem for a Dream


I'm also a huge fan of how Game of Thrones is filmed, its just constantly beautiful.

If you're saying those two movies you should watch the movie I named by Aronofsky; The Fountain. It's breathtakingly gorgeous from start to finish.

Jun 14 13 07:18 am Link

Model

Model Sarah

Posts: 39290

Columbus, Ohio, US

Also, a lot of people here are confusing cinematography with cgi.

I asked my boyfriend this question at dinner last night and within a blink of an eye he said; "That's easy, 2001 Space Oddesy." I have to admit I couldn't believe I hadn't thought of that one.

Jun 14 13 07:20 am Link

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Photographer

Justin

Posts: 21899

Fort Collins, Colorado, US

Not the best, but noteworthy because I liked the cinematography:

The Legend of the Lone Ranger, 1981. "Hey, let's make the Lone Ranger boring! And you know why he's got silver bullets? Because he's a bad shot!" But I really enjoyed the shooting style.

Excalibur. (And I actually do enjoy this as a movie.)

Seven Years in Tibet, the parts that I saw when I was awake. I didn't realize the title described the relative length of the film. But the film sure chewed on the scenery.

Jun 14 13 08:21 am Link

Photographer

KungPaoChic

Posts: 3084

West Palm Beach, Florida, US

I can't believe I forgot this film

Perfume: the Story of a Murderer
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0396171/

Hands down one of the most stunningly beautiful films I have even seen.

If you haven't seen it -- you really should.

Disturbing but so visually stunning.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0396171/

Jun 14 13 08:36 am Link

Photographer

Orca Bay Images

Posts: 32233

Woodinville, Washington, US

Model Sarah wrote:
Also, a lot of people here are confusing cinematography with cgi.

QFT.

Jun 14 13 09:58 am Link

Photographer

Looknsee Photography

Posts: 21664

Portland, Oregon, US

Model Sarah wrote:
Also, a lot of people here are confusing cinematography with cgi.

And animation -- otherwise, I'd mention "The Iron Giant" -- beautifully drawn.

Jun 14 13 10:06 am Link

Photographer

Al Lock Photography

Posts: 16071

Bangkok, Bangkok, Thailand

The Quiet Man

Jun 14 13 01:06 pm Link

Photographer

GK photo

Posts: 28076

Laguna Beach, California, US

Warren Leimbach wrote:

Are you saying you would disqualify movies like "Sin City"?

read the title of the thread. and yes, i would.

Jun 14 13 01:12 pm Link

Photographer

Al Lock Photography

Posts: 16071

Bangkok, Bangkok, Thailand

Out of interest, I looked to see which of the movies that have been mentioned in this thread have won an Academy Award for best cinematography:

The Quiet Man
Lawrence of Arabia
Doctor Zhivago
Dances With Wolves
A River Runs Through It
Saving Private Ryan
Apocalypse Now
The Last Emporer
Legends of the Fall
The Lord of teh Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring
Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon
Out of Africa
Memoirs of a Geisha


From the list of films that have won best cinematography - I offer a few more suggestions:

Gone With The Wind
Phantom of the Opera
She Wore a Yellow Ribbon
From Here to Eternity
Shane
Around the World in 80 Days
The Bridge on the River Kwai
Ben-Hur
Spartacus
The Hustler
My Fair Lady
Bonnie and Clyde
Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid
Fiddler on the Roof
The Killing Fields
Glory
Master and Commander: Far Side of the World

Jun 14 13 01:43 pm Link

Model

DivaEroticus

Posts: 14717

Fayetteville, Arkansas, US

Vintagevista wrote:
"The Cell"

The dream/inside the other person's mind

sequences were - jawdropping.

OMG THIS WAS AWESOME!!

Jun 14 13 01:46 pm Link

Photographer

m_s_photo

Posts: 602

Port Moody, British Columbia, Canada

Oh, and I almost forgot "El Topo", "Magic Mountain" and "Sante Sangre" by Jodorowsky.

Jun 14 13 02:51 pm Link

Artist/Painter

JJMiller

Posts: 619

Buffalo, New York, US

I'm not trolling here, but The Big Lebowski was fantastically shot- every scene is composed beautifully (as were Fargo and No Country for Old Men if we are talking the Coen Bros.). I also liked The Ring a lot, I remember really appreciating the cinematography when I saw it in the theater. Coraline is another gorgeous film. Blade Runner is of course one of the best.

Jun 14 13 04:58 pm Link

Photographer

DOUGLASFOTOS

Posts: 8452

Los Angeles, California, US

Al Lock Photography wrote:
Out of interest, I looked to see which of the movies that have been mentioned in this thread have won an Academy Award for best cinematography:

The Quiet Man
Lawrence of Arabia
Doctor Zhivago
Dances With Wolves
A River Runs Through It
Saving Private Ryan
Apocalypse Now
The Last Emporer
Legends of the Fall
The Lord of teh Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring
Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon
Out of Africa
Memoirs of a Geisha


From the list of films that have won best cinematography - I offer a few more suggestions:

Gone With The Wind
Phantom of the Opera
She Wore a Yellow Ribbon
From Here to Eternity
Shane
Around the World in 80 Days
The Bridge on the River Kwai
Ben-Hur
Spartacus
The Hustler
My Fair Lady
Bonnie and Clyde
Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid
Fiddler on the Roof
The Killing Fields
Glory
Master and Commander: Far Side of the World

Don't forget about Schindler's List...it won an Oscar also.

Jun 14 13 05:04 pm Link

Photographer

SteeringWinds

Posts: 98

Williamsburg, Virginia, US

For me it is without a doubt the experimental documentary Koyaanisqatsi.  If it doesn't leave you slack jawed a few times, there's something wrong with your jaw.

It's got it all:  time lapse, slow motion, aerial, portrait, macro, it's insane.  And a Philip Glass Soundtrack to go with it. 

http://koyaanisqatsi.org/films/koyaanisqatsi.php

This film is amazing.  Highly recommended.

Official trailer here:
http://youtu.be/PirH8PADDgQ

Jun 14 13 06:18 pm Link

Photographer

SPRINGHEEL

Posts: 38195

Gibraltar, Michigan, US

Action Jackson

Jun 14 13 06:27 pm Link

Photographer

255 West

Posts: 6468

New York, New York, US

Some already mentioned, and
Beast of the Southern Wild
The Powers of Ten (Original - 8minutes) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mmHa-meEOkE
Red Beard (Japanese)
Mutuluk (Turkish)
Baran (Iranian)
The Emerald Forrest

Mainstream:
Wizard of Oz
Bladerunner
Maltese Falcon
The Big Sleep
Metropolis (german)

Jun 14 13 07:05 pm Link

Photographer

Rudy Joggerst

Posts: 396

Las Vegas, Nevada, US

JJMiller wrote:
I'm not trolling here, but The Big Lebowski was fantastically shot- every scene is composed beautifully (as were Fargo and No Country for Old Men if we are talking the Coen Bros.).

With the Coen Brothers' movies you do get a sense that their set and production designs and shooting locations are very carefully chosen. There's an appreciation for detail that's especially apparent in era pieces like Big Lebowski and No Country for Old Men.

Jun 14 13 08:57 pm Link

Model

Model Sarah

Posts: 39290

Columbus, Ohio, US

JJMiller wrote:
I'm not trolling here, but The Big Lebowski was fantastically shot- every scene is composed beautifully (as were Fargo and No Country for Old Men if we are talking the Coen Bros.).

Yeah, but none of those movies are "beautiful". No Country For Old Men, you're damn right, well shot, composed, and everything else about it. Beautiful? No way.

Jun 15 13 06:25 am Link

Model

Model Sarah

Posts: 39290

Columbus, Ohio, US

SPRINGHEEL  wrote:
Action Jackson

I'm genuinely surprised you didn't say The Fountain.

Jun 15 13 06:26 am Link

Photographer

Clarence Zimmerman

Posts: 4048

Orlando, Florida, US

Orca Bay Images wrote:

Pretty terrible cinematography. So many of the grand sweeping scenes were obviously shot on an indoor set.


Speaking of grand sweeping scenery... Lawrence of Arabia. Now that was some impressive cinematography.

AH yes perhaps but I am speaking Purely of the Photography of the stills variety Not the cinematography. The op asked about the best photographed movie so I took it literally. smile

Jun 15 13 07:55 am Link

Photographer

Managing Light

Posts: 1945

Salem, Virginia, US

I'm surprised that no one has mentioned "Lincoln," with those dark, smoky and moody indoor room shots.

Jun 15 13 10:29 am Link

Photographer

Looknsee Photography

Posts: 21664

Portland, Oregon, US

Reminder:  We aren't looking for good movies; we are just looking for beautifully photographed movies.

Here's an obscure one, currently playing late at night on (I think) Starz:
     Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter, and Spring.

It's a nice little zen like movie. 



I see a pattern -- I'm liking movies with well photographed outdoor scenery.

Jun 15 13 11:28 am Link

Photographer

Rudy Joggerst

Posts: 396

Las Vegas, Nevada, US

Looknsee Photography wrote:
Here's an obscure one, currently playing late at night on (I think) Starz:
     Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter, and Spring.

It's a nice little zen like movie.

if you like spring summer fall winter and spring, check out Kim Ki-duk's other movies, he's a pretty prolific filmmaker, all good... 3-iron, samaria, breath, bad guy, the bow, etc...

Jun 15 13 12:12 pm Link

Photographer

Legacys 7

Posts: 33856

San Francisco, California, US

I have a few. But the first one that comes to my mind is, "The Shinning." The panoramic scene in the beginning as well as the giant scenes in the, "Overlook Hotel" are incredible. The hotel primarily were shot in the U.K. studio though.

My other scene is from, "Alien." Probably the best scene to date is, the fossilized "Space Jock" in the space chair. Way before cgi. It blows it away. That 1979 movie was way ahead of itself and that scene will never be dated.

"Babel."


A lot of my favorites are either the older 70's flicks from here in the States or today's foreign movies that blow away what being put out over here.

Jun 15 13 12:23 pm Link

Jun 15 13 12:24 pm Link

Artist/Painter

JJMiller

Posts: 619

Buffalo, New York, US

Yeah, but none of those movies are "beautiful". No Country For Old Men, you're damn right, well shot, composed, and everything else about it. Beautiful? No way.

I guess it depends on where you are standing- some look at a Degas and see the pretty ballerinas, others see the composition, color, draughtsmanship, etc. and find that to be the most beautiful part.

Plus this is about the most beautifully photographed, not the most beautiful aesthetically wink

Jun 15 13 12:48 pm Link

Photographer

Jirrupin

Posts: 1743

Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, Australia

the very recent "The Grandmaster" directed by Kaw Wai Wong and DP Phillip De Sourd, it looks like they took two weeks to light every scene, heard it described as a cinematographers wet dream

Jun 15 13 06:16 pm Link

Photographer

GK photo

Posts: 28076

Laguna Beach, California, US

JJMiller wrote:
I guess it depends on where you are standing- some look at a Degas and see the pretty ballerinas, others see the composition, color, draughtsmanship, etc. and find that to be the most beautiful part.

Plus this is about the most beautifully photographed, not the most beautiful aesthetically wink

beauty is in the eye, etc.

the cb's have a very refined eye, and even though they may not always use sweeping landscapes (actually, they do) and other easy visual eye candy to portray beauty in their films, they still do find ways of doing it.

the opening scene from fargo is not only visually stunning (a white out being initially pierced by a lone black bird, followed by the emergence of the burnt umber ciera), but also showcases the pure brilliance of carter burwell's understated--yet moving--score.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yw-juxQ5Sj4

they are true cinematic auteurs. so many scenes in that movie are visual feasts.

same with ncfom. i think a lot of people need flash or brilliance to convey beauty, but the cb's do it in subtle, palpable ways.

even the scenes shot in the the shoddy motels in ncfom are beautiful, as are the nighttime border town scenes (as good as welles' scenes in a touch of evil).

no need to apologize. they are masters at creating visual artistry.

miller's crossing may be their best work, as far as cinematography goes. the hat in the woods scene is a classic.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UWwOw72SeSs

Jun 15 13 10:41 pm Link

Photographer

marce fay

Posts: 855

Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

Sunshine

Jun 16 13 07:27 pm Link

Photographer

Reflected

Posts: 16078

New York, New York, US

The Thin Red Line
The New World
Tree of Life
Melancholia
Kagemusha
A Zed and Two Noughts
Drowning By Numbers
The Draughtsman's Contract

Jun 17 13 06:39 am Link

Photographer

annie lomowitz

Posts: 257

WOODY CREEK, Colorado, US

From one of the best DPs...

I don’t mind if a movie is made for a lot of money if it is great, but I don’t want to choose movies because I’m paid twice more,” he says. “It’s nice to be able to choose movies only for artistic reasons. All of these great movies that I’m making now, it’s because of that. After I did ‘The Interpreter’ with Sydney Pollack, which was a good experience, I just wanted to do films where I know that the director is free to choose the way he wants to make his movie, write the script the way he wants, have the actors he wants, has final cut, doesn’t have to listen to any studio telling him what to do. That’s the choice I’m making at the moment, deliberately.”

Jun 17 13 07:07 am Link

Photographer

Vintagevista

Posts: 11042

Sun City, California, US

Stephen Dawson wrote:
Excalibur

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-VVEFH18JXJ8/Tnd4Fc53_uI/AAAAAAAAA1Q/XL9P0CbWFl8/s1600/excalibur+wedding.jpg

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-gBrwK-opDZY/TarGJOGV9DI/AAAAAAAAFZU/DYdu9XqQLdc/s1600/Excalibur+Pic+001.jpg

http://cineplex.media.baselineresearch.com/images/306559/306559_large.jpg

You know Encore just had this on - the last time I saw it was YEARS ago.

Now, after doing photography for a while - I realize

That all the shiny armor reflects the lighting setups  - and the camera crew - in a lot of the shots,.

Jun 22 13 02:21 pm Link

Photographer

Greybeard Images

Posts: 517

Sand City, California, US

Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon

Jun 22 13 04:40 pm Link

Photographer

scrymettet

Posts: 32257

Quebec, Quebec, Canada

the night of the hunter
Casablanca

once upon a time in the West

Alexander Nevsky

Les misérables ( 30's with Harry Baur)

La grande illusion

Jun 22 13 05:11 pm Link

Photographer

MMR Digital

Posts: 1717

Doylestown, Pennsylvania, US

The Magnificent Seven.

Jun 22 13 05:14 pm Link

Model

Calli Pygian

Posts: 8092

Atlanta, Georgia, US

I agree with Amelie and The Fountain.

I would also add Moulin Rouge--the colors, the costumes, the makeup, the sets...all amazing.  I could not stop staring at Nicole Kidman's face every time they did a closeup.  Her makeup artist did an outstanding job!

Also, I noted that some mentioned The Fall and The Cell, and I would agree with both.  Some of the scenes made me think that a Dali painting had come to life.

Jun 22 13 05:46 pm Link

Photographer

Andrew Kaiser

Posts: 1306

Portland, Oregon, US

The Fall
Wings of Desire
Bladerunner
Control
Children of Men
City of God

(in no particular order of course)

Jun 22 13 08:27 pm Link

Photographer

DwLPhoto

Posts: 586

Palo Alto, California, US

Barry Lyndon

Jun 22 13 09:46 pm Link

Photographer

Shot By Adam

Posts: 5946

Las Vegas, Nevada, US

When I saw the movie The American, about half way through I looked at my wife and said, "I'll bet you anything that the director used to be a photographer." After the movie I looked up Anton Corbijn and found out that yes, he has a background in still photography. It's not a particularly amazing film but I really liked it and the whole movie looks like it was films by a series of beautiful still shots.

Jun 22 13 11:38 pm Link