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Model
Rachael Bueckert
Posts: 1,121
Red Deer, Alberta, Canada


Hello there MMers. I've just started getting into doing more paid work, and find that the photographers I work with only pay the rate for the time that they are pointing the camera. Even though I am at the shoot and getting prepared long before then, usually doing my own makeup, the whole process taking up about 4-5 hours while I only really get paid for maybe 1 or 2 (the clock stops whenever the photog stops shooting).

I was just wondering if this is normal. And if it is not normal, how do I go about bringing it up to the photographer?

And before I get the barage of rants, yes I know that the photographer work is 'just beginning' when a shoot ends. But a models work begins far before the shoot starts.


EDIT (from page 3):
Thank you so much everyone for taking the time to write out thoughtful replies! It is very appreciated  smile

So, the trends in responses I'm seeing so far;

-It is best to charge half day or full day rates (there was one post about 'quarter day', which seems to be reasonable to me as well)

- The clock starts when the model arrive (on time). Time in the makeup chair is on the clock. **I noticed the only people who objected to this were photographers. Most (if not all) models said time in the chair is on the clock, and some photographers agreed as well. I'm curious about this.

- When a model is getting paid, it is a JOB, meaning no phone play or wasting time on set. Not that I ever do this anyway, I always like to have -professional- fun at a shoot  smile

-When the clock starts, it doesn't stop until the shoot is wrapped up. This includes makeup touchups, wardobe changes, lighting changes, location/set changes.


Is this all correct? Please correct me if I am wrong on something (of course everyone will have different opinions).

Somebody said it would be a 'deal breaker' if a model stated that the clock starts when the call time is, or that she expects to be paid for being in the MUA chair. Models: would you be flexible with this if the photographer didn't like it? Or would you stand your ground? Photographers: Would you be willing to pay a model for this time spent, since she is taking time out of her day and is 'on the job' getting her makeup done? Or while you are setting up lights and she is ready to go, should she be paid for her time?
Oct 06 12 10:55 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Art of the nude
Posts: 11,889
Olivet, Michigan, US


Rachael Bueckert wrote:
Hello there MMers. I've just started getting into doing more paid work, and find that the photographers I work with only pay the rate for the time that they are pointing the camera. Even though I am at the shoot and getting prepared long before then, usually doing my own makeup, the whole process taking up about 4-5 hours while I only really get paid for maybe 1 or 2 (the clock stops whenever the photog stops shooting).

I was just wondering if this is normal. And if it is not normal, how do I go about bringing it up to the photographer?

And before I get the barage of rants, yes I know that the photographer work is 'just beginning' when a shoot ends. But a models work begins far before the shoot starts.

The right answer is, "whatever you agreed." 

If someone's paying you, it should be clarified.  It's not reasonable to make someone work three hours without pay, but it's also not reasonable to pay you for five hours and have you goof off for 3-4 of them, which is *possible* if they're paying when you're not shooting.  So, both parties should clarify the expectations.

But, in my last shoot, which lasted about 6 hours, I was "pointing the camera" for about 20 minutes and took about 200 images.  At an average of 1/100 of a second shutter speed, I was shooting for two seconds.

Oct 06 12 11:01 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Alivia Autumn
Posts: 610
Albuquerque, New Mexico, US


You certainly shouldn't be paid for makeup and styling, especially if it takes you hours, a pro MUA could have your full face done in 15-20 mins, same goes for hair.  As a fellow model, I think what's fair would be from the moment you start shooting until the shoot is finished.  If the photographer is taking forever to set up, sure I guess you could try to justify being paid.
Oct 06 12 11:04 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Art of the nude
Posts: 11,889
Olivet, Michigan, US


Alivia Autumn wrote:
You certainly shouldn't be paid for makeup and styling, especially if it takes you hours, a pro MUA could have your full face done in 15-20 mins, same goes for hair.  As a fellow model, I think what's fair would be from the moment you start shooting until the shoot is finished.  If the photographer is taking forever to set up, sure I guess you could try to justify being paid.

It can take hours because someone is really slow, or because the makeup and styling is very elaborate.  Three hours isn't out of line for high end beauty, it's absurd for a basic look.

Oct 06 12 11:10 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
LA StarShooter
Posts: 1,852
Los Angeles, California, US


Rachael Bueckert wrote:
Hello there MMers. I've just started getting into doing more paid work, and find that the photographers I work with only pay the rate for the time that they are pointing the camera. Even though I am at the shoot and getting prepared long before then, usually doing my own makeup, the whole process taking up about 4-5 hours while I only really get paid for maybe 1 or 2 (the clock stops whenever the photog stops shooting).

I was just wondering if this is normal. And if it is not normal, how do I go about bringing it up to the photographer?

And before I get the barage of rants, yes I know that the photographer work is 'just beginning' when a shoot ends. But a models work begins far before the shoot starts.

Are you including travel time in your four-to-five hours?  I've seen that a lot of travelling models charge for travel time, in the way they explain it on their profiles.

Others do a half day and a full day rate, and travelling time is thrown into this, quite often. 

Perhaps you could break your fee into an hourly rate with a minimum number of hours. Some models do a three-hour minimum and charge for travel time if it takes more then 30 minutes to get there.

It's nice of you to do your own makeup but it would be good to form a partnership with MUAs and hairstylists and encourage them to come up with a shooter's rate when the shoot is not immediately destined for publication.  That way you can get different looks and broaden your contacts.

Congratulations on your start and good luck.

Oct 06 12 11:14 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Rachael Bueckert
Posts: 1,121
Red Deer, Alberta, Canada


I only take about 15 minutes for my makeup. The rest of the time is spent setting up the set - lights, test shots ect. Then changing wardrobe, altering makeup slightly, changing set or location, fixing lights, ect. You all know how the time goes. But in some of the shoots I've been paid for, whenever the shooting stops for any reason, the time stops. I've started implementing a 2 hour minimum for local shoots and a 4 hour minimum for out of town shoots since it takes about 2 hours to travel to the main cities in my province and costs over 60 dollars for greyhound tickets.

So how do you tell a photographer when you think the clock should start, without them getting defensive about it?
Oct 06 12 11:23 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Molly K
Posts: 230
New York, New York, US


Alivia Autumn wrote:
You certainly shouldn't be paid for makeup and styling, especially if it takes you hours, a pro MUA could have your full face done in 15-20 mins, same goes for hair.  As a fellow model, I think what's fair would be from the moment you start shooting until the shoot is finished.  If the photographer is taking forever to set up, sure I guess you could try to justify being paid.

Hmm I would disagree with this and actually have never come across this in my agency work or in my freelance work in my 7+ years experience. If the shoot is paid hourly then the clock starts when I have walked through the door and sat down in the chair and whenever my call time was and this goes for my day rates with overtime allowances. I'm still at work so i am getting paid for it. Also sometimes the styling is extensive and can take a lot of time no matter how much of a pro the stylists are...my hair also takes wayyyy longer than 20 minutes.

However this should be discussed if it is a concern to you. Some people may be different.

Oct 06 12 11:29 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Blue Ash Film Group
Posts: 9,506
Cincinnati, Ohio, US


Alivia Autumn wrote:
You certainly shouldn't be paid for makeup and styling, especially if it takes you hours, a pro MUA could have your full face done in 15-20 mins, same goes for hair.  As a fellow llama, I think what's fair would be from the moment you start shooting until the shoot is finished.  If the photographer is taking forever to set up, sure I guess you could try to justify being paid.

You have been working with way faster makeup and hair artists than I have.

Oct 06 12 11:34 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Rachael Bueckert
Posts: 1,121
Red Deer, Alberta, Canada


Molly K wrote:

Hmm I would disagree with this and actually have never come across this in my agency work or in my freelance work in my 7+ years experience. If the shoot is paid hourly then the clock starts when I have walked through the door and sat down in the chair and whenever my call time was and this goes for my day rates with overtime allowances. I'm still at work so i am getting paid for it. Also sometimes the styling is extensive and can take a lot of time no matter how much of a pro the stylists are...my hair also takes wayyyy longer than 20 minutes.

However this should be discussed if it is a concern to you. Some people may be different.

Exactly... I'm still working long before the shoot actually starts, and it seems a little unreasonable to be required to be at a shoot at say 1pm and then only start getting paid at 2 or 2:30pm (after I've done my makeup and photographer has finished setting up)... and then stop getting paid 20 minutes later cause the photographer has his shots...

Oct 06 12 11:37 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Alivia Autumn
Posts: 610
Albuquerque, New Mexico, US


Art of the nude wrote:

It can take hours because someone is really slow, or because the makeup and styling is very elaborate.  Three hours isn't out of line for high end beauty, it's absurd for a basic look.

In this case OP implies she's doing her own looks

Oct 06 12 11:43 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Alivia Autumn
Posts: 610
Albuquerque, New Mexico, US


I can understand being paid when a team is there, but if you're creating your own look that's on you. Friendly question. If you want to be paid.for pre-shooting work, then why arent photographers being paid for post work. If you hired one, would you have him log his hours of post production and editing or only pay for the hours he was shooting you?
Oct 06 12 11:53 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Ivanafox
Posts: 979
Healesville, Victoria, Australia


Normally for me when I shoot with an MM'er, a shoot starts when I was scheduled to arrive (I'm usually 20 mins early) and finishes when the shoot is finished. The commercial shoots I have done are usually the same though I have had a few that stated make-up was on my time however every single one has wrapped up hours earlier than what I was paid for so I've not lost anything.

The clock stopping and starting during the shoot seems very bizarre to me but if you are experiencing this enough to be asking about it, then it must be the way photographers in your area operate. I would suggest you ditch the per hour rate and quote a day/ half day rate that encompasses a set period of time for when you are in attendance.
Oct 06 12 11:55 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Miss Leilani Jade
Posts: 2,513
Decatur, Alabama, US


15-20 minutes by a pro????  I have never ever seen a pro do that in all of the modeling I have done.  I arrange ahead of time for MUAH and arrive at the shoot ready with the first look already on.  If it is a collaboration for everyone things are different. 

I have actually never had anyone do what they are doing to you OP but anything is possible.  I speak alot with the photographer and we make a decision on how many hours.  I have a 3 hour minimum but for the most part I end up with 4 hours.  Several times I have even lost track of time and usually the photographers remind me I have gone over and our shoot is complete.

Bottom line I would say you should go into the shoot ready if you have to change then change and head straight into the stuido that way he knows he is on the clock
Oct 06 12 11:55 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Alivia Autumn
Posts: 610
Albuquerque, New Mexico, US


Ivanafox wrote:
Normally for me when I shoot with an MM'er, a shoot starts when I was scheduled to arrive (I'm usually 20 mins early) and finishes when the shoot is finished. The commercial shoots I have done are usually the same though I have had a few that stated make-up was on my time however every single one has wrapped up hours earlier than what I was paid for so I've not lost anything.

The clock stopping and starting during the shoot seems very bizarre to me but if you are experiencing this enough to be asking about it, then it must be the way photographers in your area operate. I would suggest you ditch the per hour rate and quote a day/ half day rate that encompasses a set period of time for when you are in attendance.

That seems like an excellent idea.  Day half/day would protect you both rather than hourly, since it is so arbitrary.

Oct 07 12 12:09 am  Link  Quote 
Model
Rachael Bueckert
Posts: 1,121
Red Deer, Alberta, Canada


Alivia Autumn wrote:
I can understand being paid when a team is there, but if you're creating your own look that's on you. Friendly question. If you want to be paid.for pre-shooting work, then why arent photographers being paid for post work. If you hired one, would you have him log his hours of post production and editing or only pay for the hours he was shooting you?

Actually, I consider the 'post-time' pay already in a photographers fee. A photographers fee is generally several hundred dollars more than your average models fee. I think that's fair enough.

Oct 07 12 12:25 am  Link  Quote 
Model
Alivia Autumn
Posts: 610
Albuquerque, New Mexico, US


Rachael Bueckert wrote:

Actually, I consider the 'post-time' pay already in a photographers fee. A photographers fee is generally several hundred dollars more than your average models fee. I think that's fair enough.

Good point.  Although I've seen models charge quite a bit.  Not sure what your rates are, but I can agree, some photographers here charge immense amounts.

Oct 07 12 12:30 am  Link  Quote 
Model
Rachael Bueckert
Posts: 1,121
Red Deer, Alberta, Canada


Ivanafox wrote:
Normally for me when I shoot with an MM'er, a shoot starts when I was scheduled to arrive (I'm usually 20 mins early) and finishes when the shoot is finished. The commercial shoots I have done are usually the same though I have had a few that stated make-up was on my time however every single one has wrapped up hours earlier than what I was paid for so I've not lost anything.

The clock stopping and starting during the shoot seems very bizarre to me but if you are experiencing this enough to be asking about it, then it must be the way photographers in your area operate. I would suggest you ditch the per hour rate and quote a day/ half day rate that encompasses a set period of time for when you are in attendance.

That seems like a good idea. I'll mention that next time I'm asked for rates, thanks!

Oct 07 12 12:38 am  Link  Quote 
Model
Rachael Bueckert
Posts: 1,121
Red Deer, Alberta, Canada


Alivia Autumn wrote:

Good point.  Although I've seen models charge quite a bit.  Not sure what your rates are, but I can agree, some photographers here charge immense amounts.

Ya, my rates are fairly entry level. They go up a bit for commercial projects, and I adjust them to the occassion and purpose of the shoot, travel ect. But certainly quite low. Which makes it not worth my time when I only get paid for an hour or two, when I've been at the shoot for several hours, hours that I could be spending at my regular job. And when I travel, it takes 4 hours out of my day to go to either of the two main cities, so it all adds up...

Oct 07 12 12:42 am  Link  Quote 
Model
Kelleth
Posts: 2,527
Toronto, Ontario, Canada


From the calltime you are given (unless you're late) to the time the shoot is wrapped (the last photo is taken).
Oct 07 12 12:49 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Digitoxin
Posts: 13,345
Houston, Texas, US


Molly K wrote:
Hmm I would disagree with this and actually have never come across this in my agency work or in my freelance work in my 7+ years experience. If the shoot is paid hourly then the clock starts when I have walked through the door and sat down in the chair and whenever my call time was and this goes for my day rates with overtime allowances. I'm still at work so i am getting paid for it. Also sometimes the styling is extensive and can take a lot of time no matter how much of a pro the stylists are...my hair also takes wayyyy longer than 20 minutes.

However this should be discussed if it is a concern to you. Some people may be different.

+1?

Add to the above a Day rate (or half day) and all is well in the universe.

Oct 07 12 01:58 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
William Kious
Posts: 8,841
Delphos, Ohio, US


Kelleth wrote:
From the calltime you are given (unless you're late) to the time the shoot is wrapped (the last photo is taken).

While this is true for a commercial shoot, very few freelance photographers are going to pay in this fashion (or want to hassle with having models punch time cards.) Quite a few traveling models would price themselves right out of work.

OP, make it easy on yourself and come up with a rate based on blocks of time (with the photographer covering your travel expenses.) If you feel you should be paid the moment you arrive, then make that clear in your negotiations. Better yet, figure up a day rate and be done with it.

Oct 07 12 02:08 am  Link  Quote 
Model
Rachael Bueckert
Posts: 1,121
Red Deer, Alberta, Canada


William Kious wrote:

While this is true for a commercial shoot, very few freelance photographers are going to pay in this fashion. Quite a few traveling models would price themselves right out of work.

OP, make it easy on yourself and come up with a rate based on blocks of time (with the photographer covering your travel expenses.) If you feel you should be paid the moment you arrive, then make that clear in your negotiations. Better yet, figure up a day rate and be done with it.

So day (half day) rate plus travel or flat day (half day) rate? And would the time taken to travel be counted in the hours for the day/half day?

Oct 07 12 02:12 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
William Kious
Posts: 8,841
Delphos, Ohio, US


Rachael Bueckert wrote:

So day (half day) rate plus travel or flat day (half day) rate? And would the time taken to travel be counted in the hours for the day/half day?

I would consider paying for travel (gas/ticket) but I'm not going to pay for the time it takes for you to reach the location. When you have a 9-to-5 job, are you paid for your commute? No.

Oct 07 12 02:25 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
William Kious
Posts: 8,841
Delphos, Ohio, US


double post
Oct 07 12 02:25 am  Link  Quote 
guide forum
Model
Anna Adrielle
Posts: 18,763
Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium


I would think, when you walk on set. if they have provided a muah, that is included as well (so if you want me to sit in make up for 3 hours and then shoot half an hour, it counts as 3 hours and a half).

I wouldn't include prepwork at home
Oct 07 12 02:46 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Kent Art Photography
Posts: 2,856
Ashford, England, United Kingdom


It starts the minute they walk in the door,  and it usually finishes at the allotted time for the end of the shoot - unless the model has another shoot lined up and they need time to undo whatever's been done to them to get them ready for your shoot.

The day or half day rule used to be the norm, but there does seem to have been a switch to charging by the hour in the last twenty years.  The breakdown of the client/agency/photographer/model relationship has probably had a hand in that, and part-time models willing to shoot evenings and odd hours might have helped, too, so the rules aren't as hard as fast as they were.
Oct 07 12 02:47 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Four-Eleven Productions
Posts: 749
Fircrest, Washington, US


Digital photography makes this so much simpler, since each image is time-stamped.

My clock runs from the shooting of the first image to the shooting of the last image. The model is off the clock for her initial makeup, and I am off the clock for my post-work...but there's never any question about the numbers.

It's not a perfect system, since I've found some models using the closed door of the wardrobe changing process to respond to texts and update their Facebook status, etc. (I'm thinking, 'What do you MEAN she wrote that at 3:18 p.m.??? She was supposed to be on my clock then.')
Oct 07 12 02:56 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
William Kious
Posts: 8,841
Delphos, Ohio, US


Four-Eleven Productions wrote:
It's not a perfect system, since I've found some models using the closed door of the wardrobe changing process to respond to texts and update their Facebook status, etc. (I'm thinking, 'What do you MEAN she wrote that at 3:18 p.m.??? She was on my time then.')

Throw a rock at that hornet's nest! big_smile

This is a personal peeve of mine. A model wants paid an hourly rate (including travel, lodging and a budget for meals) yet often doesn't want to treat modeling as a job. Even better is when the photographer is expected to pay for an escort's meal in addition to the quoted rate.

Oct 07 12 03:00 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Four-Eleven Productions
Posts: 749
Fircrest, Washington, US


William Kious wrote:

Throw a rock at that hornet's nest! big_smile

This is a personal peeve of mine. A model wants paid an hourly rate (including travel, lodging and a budget for meals) yet often doesn't want to treat modeling as a job. Even better is when the photographer is expected to pay for an escort's meal in addition to the quoted rate.

Ouch!

Oct 07 12 03:03 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Woven Thought
Posts: 329
Petersburg, Virginia, US


I don't pay models, but I have to say stopping your pay because the camera is not going makes no sense at all to me.  I wouldn't want YOU to stop paying ME if I wasn't snapping the camera the entire time.  Stingy! 

When people pay me, I have a start and end time in the contract and there is a set rate for that time.  I ask that they come 15 minutes before.  If I don't have a shoot before and they're early, I start. I also have a little extra time allowed at the end of a session. If someone is on time, they could easily get thirty minutes more than they "paid" for, but I have that planned in there.

Let's see, someone pays me for an hour shoot, but I shoot for 90 minutes, how do you think the client will feel?  It's just how I operate.  Stinginess and all about the money, just not the feel I want.
Oct 07 12 03:14 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
William Kious
Posts: 8,841
Delphos, Ohio, US


Four-Eleven Productions wrote:

Ouch!

Ouch, nothing... I've encountered that very demand on multiple occasions. wink

Oct 07 12 03:20 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
AJ_In_Atlanta
Posts: 12,801
Atlanta, Georgia, US


Well the norm is day and 1/2 day rates, per hour is not.  As for when, it's whatever the call time is for.  Obviously if you are a hour early and sitting in the waiting room texting you should not get paid, just like a day job.  If the photographer is a hour over fixing lights then you would get paid, just like a day job.

Now around MM it's not uncommon for new photographer or even models to think "when shooting starts" so communications and education are key.  Things around here are never the norm.
Oct 07 12 03:30 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Designit - Edward Olson
Posts: 1,636
Eureka, California, US


Kelleth wrote:
From the calltime you are given (unless you're late) to the time the shoot is wrapped (the last photo is taken).

This is the correct answer. A person should be paid for any time that is not their own to control. Whether it is in a flat rate (half/full day) or hourly.

If you are doing your own hair/makeup, there can be a case made that if you do it after you arrive, and are being paid on an hourly basis, that time might not be paid.

Oct 07 12 10:37 am  Link  Quote 
Model
Babalon Salome
Posts: 3,499
Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany


Kelleth wrote:
From the calltime you are given (unless you're late) to the time the shoot is wrapped (the last photo is taken).

This.

Oct 07 12 10:39 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Art of the nude
Posts: 11,889
Olivet, Michigan, US


Rachael Bueckert wrote:
I only take about 15 minutes for my makeup. The rest of the time is spent setting up the set - lights, test shots ect. Then changing wardrobe, altering makeup slightly, changing set or location, fixing lights, ect. You all know how the time goes. But in some of the shoots I've been paid for, whenever the shooting stops for any reason, the time stops. I've started implementing a 2 hour minimum for local shoots and a 4 hour minimum for out of town shoots since it takes about 2 hours to travel to the main cities in my province and costs over 60 dollars for greyhound tickets.

So how do you tell a photographer when you think the clock should start, without them getting defensive about it?

You weren't clear at first.  If the shoot hasn't started because YOU aren't ready, there's some basis for discussion.  If it's past the agreed time and THEY aren't ready, you should be paid.  I did have one model very kindly not charge when I was an hour late, but there was 20 inches of snow the night before and getting to the site 120 miles away was a bit of a challenge.  She deferred my time, and we got the full time and rate.

Oct 07 12 01:48 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Art of the nude
Posts: 11,889
Olivet, Michigan, US


Alivia Autumn wrote:
I can understand being paid when a team is there, but if you're creating your own look that's on you. Friendly question. If you want to be paid.for pre-shooting work, then why arent photographers being paid for post work. If you hired one, would you have him log his hours of post production and editing or only pay for the hours he was shooting you?

I appreciate your thinking, but photographers rarely charge (only) by the hour they are on set, if they're doing the post work.  Or, they build in an allowance for other parts of the job.

Oct 07 12 01:50 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Julia Francesca
Posts: 2,357
Maumee, Ohio, US


for me it starts from the time i'm scheduled to start. so if i show up a little early, it'll still start at the scheduled time. sometimes they can have you waiting for a while so make sure to get that discussion out of the way before working together! the payment you receive is for YOUR time, not theirs.
Oct 07 12 01:51 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Art of the nude
Posts: 11,889
Olivet, Michigan, US


Four-Eleven Productions wrote:
It's not a perfect system, since I've found some models using the closed door of the wardrobe changing process to respond to texts and update their Facebook status, etc. (I'm thinking, 'What do you MEAN she wrote that at 3:18 p.m.??? She was on my time then.')

William Kious wrote:
Throw a rock at that hornet's nest! big_smile

This is a personal peeve of mine. A model wants paid an hourly rate (including travel, lodging and a budget for meals) yet often doesn't want to treat modeling as a job. Even better is when the photographer is expected to pay for an escort's meal in addition to the quoted rate.

Sometimes, the obvious answer is, NEXT!

Oct 07 12 01:53 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
WCR3
Posts: 1,064
Houston, Texas, US


When the model comes to my location, I think I should pay her from the time she walks in the door if it's a paid shoot. On the other hand, when I travel to the model's location, which happens often enough, I ask beforehand if I can arrive early to set up backgrounds, lights and so forth off the clock, then shoot for the time agreed on the clock. I've never had a problem with the models doing it that way, and I think it's fair. Keep in mind that I'm a hobbyist. I don't make my living doing this. Professional photographers may have an entirely different slant on this.
Oct 07 12 07:40 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Laura UnBound
Posts: 27,367
Toronto, Ontario, Canada


The only problem you'll run into is trying to actually sell half and full day rates. You're going to run into a lot of "but I only need an hour, can I pay your 1/4 of that?" or they're only going to see the price in your reply, not hours allotted, and immediately decline without actually realizing "I can get four whole hours for that price and not have to rush and not have to be stingy on timing and actually make sure I get the shots I want!"

Maybe it's different for you, I very rarely get a half or full day booking. It's always 1.5-3 hours, and they're a pain in the ass to quote a price for, especially when it's over an hour for me to get to them half the time
Oct 07 12 07:52 pm  Link  Quote 
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