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Model
AshGold29
Posts: 6
Huddersfield, England, United Kingdom


Had my first TF a couple of weeks ago, uploaded a few of the images to my profile.

I'm 5'7 in height, so I would probably be more suited to commerical modelling.

Please let me know if you think I have potential (if I have a good look, poses etc), how I can improve, what you like/dislike and so on.


Thank you, any tips/advice would be appreciated. smile

Sarah
Jan 06 13 02:48 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
T A X I
Posts: 199
San Diego, California, US


SarahAshley29 wrote:
Had my first TF a couple of weeks ago, uploaded a few of the images to my profile.

I'm 5'7 in height, so I would probably be more suited to commerical modelling.

Please let me know if you think I have potential (if I have a good look, poses etc), how I can improve, what you like/dislike and so on.


Thank you, any tips/advice would be appreciated. smile

Sarah

Eh, lets jsut say it looks like it's your first shoot wink

if you're going into the commercial field you'll need to show more emotion and be able to pose. Because I don't not see either in any of the shots. Although @ 5'7 you may segway into lingerie (if your open to that) as well since you have nice skin and a pretty face. But commercial work is all about your face and being comfortable in front of the camera which you wil learn.

your best shot:
http://photos.modelmayhem.com/photos/130106/12/50e9db55c627a_m.jpg

gluck

Jan 06 13 03:00 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
AshGold29
Posts: 6
Huddersfield, England, United Kingdom


T A X I wrote:

Eh, lets jsut say it looks like it's your first shoot wink

if you're going into the commercial field you'll need to show more emotion and be able to pose. Because I don't not see either in any of the shots. Although @ 5'7 you may segway into lingerie (if your open to that) as well since you have nice skin and a pretty face. But commercial work is all about your face and being comfortable in front of the camera which you wil learn.

your best shot:
http://photos.modelmayhem.com/photos/130106/12/50e9db55c627a_m.jpg

gluck

Thank you! Definitely felt a little awkward in front of the camera but I'm hoping that after gaining more experience through doing more TF's that'll get better in time.
Definitely going to keep practising with the emotion I portray, not too sure about lingerie.

Probably my fave shot as well,
Thanks again smile

Jan 06 13 03:04 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
AshGold29
Posts: 6
Huddersfield, England, United Kingdom


Anyone else? smile
Jan 06 13 07:47 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Julia Francesca
Posts: 2,357
Maumee, Ohio, US


yeah i agree, awkwardness, but that's to be expected for a first shoot! you definitely did better than i did at MY first shoot! lol. to loosen up i usually listen to crazy loud fun music on my way to the location so that i sing along at the top of my lungs and other people laugh at me when they're stopped next to me at stop lights. this helps me loosen up a bit and feel a lot more confident. it may not work for you, find YOUR thing that helps you relax. i need to be loud and crazy, but you might need aromatherapy candles or something like that, whatever works. also, faking confidence helps, i do that a lot for big projects. i'll strut in like i'm the most awesome model ever, even if i'm nervous as hell, and as the photographer warms up to me i definitely feel more bold and more like i can do what they need me to do. oooh, on another note, some simple facial stretches help me loosen up my face muscles so it's easier for me to give expression, 5 minutes of tongue twisters usually does the trick. maybe they'll work for you?

best advice i can give is to model as much as possible, the more experience you get the better, practice makes perfect!! you're super pretty and i'm sure a lot of photographers would love to test/tf with you!! good luck smile
Jan 06 13 07:59 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
ShotbyRon
Posts: 767
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, US


Not to beat the issue to death, but I agree with the comments above. You need to work on your posing and your expressions. I see no emotion in any of your pictures
Jan 06 13 08:05 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Aaron Lewis Photography
Posts: 5,082
Catskill, New York, US


I also concur.
Jan 06 13 08:12 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
sammyspade
Posts: 98
Portland, Oregon, US


Ditto.  You're very pretty and look like you have a great body.  Stand in front of a mirror and work on a hand full of expressions that you can do like second nature.  Also get a few poses down, but a photographer can pose your body, not your face, so expressions are the most important to work on first.  I can't stress this enough.  The difference between and OK photo and a great photo is often nothing more than the expression on the model's face.  Serious, seductive, mischievous, pouty, etc.

And shoot, shoot, shoot.  Time in front of the camera will help you relax and have fun. 

I think it's a great first shoot.  Keep going and have a blast.
Jan 06 13 08:23 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
TRPn Pics
Posts: 10,431
Andrews, North Carolina, US


Not too bad, for what it's worth here's my .02

Confidence is a must. Whether you shoot lingerie or you wear a burqa, you have to conduct yourself in front of the camera as if you can do anything with ease. The more you make it look like a natural thing instead of something posed, the images will improve. If you have second thoughts while shooting about how you look or the pose your working, the camera captures that. Emoting a natural confidence will go a long way to improving the images you produce.

You know how to walk, ride a bike or lacing up your own shoes even, you don't think twice about those things, why, because you've done them for so long that thinking about it is not really something you concentrate on, it just comes naturally. Well, try to exercise the same thought process upon arrival at your next shoot as it pertains to confidence and you'll achieve a vast improvement from the first shoot.

Examining the poses and expressions of commercial, editorial and catalog models and practicing the looks they produce is good advice. But don't rely on what you see them achieving to much because you have your own unique look, in that, make each pose yours, not something you've seen somewhere else. This is where confidence is most important.

Most of all, loosen up and just be yourself and the images will improve. You got this. smile
Jan 06 13 10:21 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Eyesso
Posts: 732
Ormond Beach, Florida, US


http://photos.modelmayhem.com/photos/130106/15/50ea03e36980b.jpg


That's my favorite picture. 

I think often "less is more".  You already have all the natural beauty you need to be a model.  My advice would be to simplify....less hair, less make up, less lighting.  Just let you be you, get outside in some natural light and let a photographer capture the beauty that shines from underneath.

You don't need to try to be pretty....you already are.
Jan 06 13 10:45 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
AshGold29
Posts: 6
Huddersfield, England, United Kingdom


Thank you so much for the advice everyone! It's definitely helping.

Is it bad that I can't see what everyone means about showing emotion? The photographer kept telling me to smile when I wasn't which I then did in the majority of my shots. How can I portray more emotion with my facial expression/poses?
For my next shoot any exercises/research/preparation tips of things I can do to produce better pictures would be great!

Also at first, I felt a little awkward but loosened up as the shoot went on.

Thanks again
Jan 08 13 11:29 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
eye4art
Posts: 4
San Diego, California, US


OK, your first shoot is behind you and you started to get over the newness and anxiety of the process.  Photographers shooting women go thru much the same thing until they get comfortable in this situation. 
The most important thing is to keep shooting and you'll get more comfortable and let your personality out and play around and have some fun and not be sooo worried about each image.

If you really want this whole modeling thing, treat it as a profession:  as such, you have to become a student of imagery.  Start by setting a "list" of images you like or want to duplicate.  Start looking at images and notice the details, mouth, hand and legs, every part of the image, get serious with this, it's your chosen profession.

Nudity is overrated, don't put a priority on it.  Clothes and other products are what people pay for and pay models to promote.  Nudity is for really hot bodies and celebs.  But it's limited.

Last, being on the web is not the ultimate end in modeling.  Being a web-model is cool and fun but it's not the royal road to wealth and fame.

Hope this helps.
Have fun and be safe and we'll see you on the cover of Vogue!!
Jan 08 13 01:13 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
PDF IMAGES PHOTOGRAPHY
Posts: 4,603
Jacksonville, Florida, US


try posing in front of a full length mirror and work on poses and expression, this may help you with "awkwardness" in front of the camera, relax you'll get better and you are very attractive btw smile, beautiful eyes !
Jan 08 13 01:23 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
sammyspade
Posts: 98
Portland, Oregon, US


SarahAshley29 wrote:
Thank you so much for the advice everyone! It's definitely helping.

Is it bad that I can't see what everyone means about showing emotion? The photographer kept telling me to smile when I wasn't which I then did in the majority of my shots. How can I portray more emotion with my facial expression/poses?
For my next shoot any exercises/research/preparation tips of things I can do to produce better pictures would be great!

Also at first, I felt a little awkward but loosened up as the shoot went on.

Thanks again

Some examples:

Smirk:
http://www.deviantart.com/download/1167 … scenic.jpg

Sexy/Sultry:
http://www.thecoolist.com/wp-content/up … aphy_1.jpg

Smile:
http://allhealthhub.com/wp-content/uplo … -Tips1.jpg

Spend lots of time in front of a mirror.  The fact that you're really interested in learning the craft says a lot.  Practice.

Jan 08 13 01:31 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Burlap Rats
Posts: 18,942
Riverside, California, US


Okay, less is more. You know what to fix from here on out. This actually isn't a bad shoot you had! Cull your port down to the strongest shots.
My opinion is to keep these:
http://photos.modelmayhem.com/photos/130106/12/50e9db55c627a_m.jpg
http://photos.modelmayhem.com/photos/130106/14/50e9f7f187b11_m.jpg
http://photos.modelmayhem.com/photos/130107/10/50eb12dcf2d5e_m.jpg
http://photos.modelmayhem.com/photos/130106/14/50e9f92c8cd50_m.jpg

And keep shooting! The more and more you do, the more comfortable you will feel!!
Jan 08 13 01:39 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Justin Foto
Posts: 3,605
Sankt Margrethen, Saint Gall, Switzerland


Just keep at it. The stuff you've posted isn't bad for a first shot, but if you do keep at it, they'll look really naive to you in a years time smile

Study posing and facial expressions. You can find some decent examples here, but magazines and catalogs are probably a better bet. Try to relax, don't over think it, just do it and have fun!

By the way...Peterborough/Huddersfield area? That's the first time I've heard what is basically half of England described as an area. I'm from the Bedfordshire / Tyne and Wear area myself! wink

Good luck!
Jan 08 13 02:32 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Mark
Posts: 2,889
New York, New York, US


Hi Sarah,  sorry to say but no I don't think you have much potential to work as a model. The good news is I don't know all that much about working on MM but more about agency modeling (including London where I worked for over 4 months).

You are right to say commercial is more appropriate for you, but even still I wouldn't suggest putting much hope/energy into it.  If you do keep pursuing it- then do more commercial style shots which these are not.  More life style- having fun smiles, more personality.  Try shooting outdoors or on location- cafes, house, gym etc.  I think your wardrobe is not right either- so study the catologs/web sites or Jcrew, Banana Republic, Anthropology, Theory, Urban Outfitters and the advertising aimed at teens.

Your make up should be pretty natural natural.  In some of these pics your hair is not flattering- not well groomed or styled.

As for poses- a lot of that reflects the level of experience of the photographer that you are working with.  I would coach you through the shoot, I wouldnt put you on that chair as in your first shot- it serves no one well- the dress is not being highlighted, you look a little thick in the waist, etc. AND never ever put a hand across your abdomen as it looks like you are trying to conceal a belly bulge.

You can tear out magazine photos of poses and photography that you like and keep in a folder and then bring that with you when you interview to shoot with some one as possibilities and then keep them on the set to refer to/ remind you.

Mark
Jan 09 13 12:31 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
AshGold29
Posts: 6
Huddersfield, England, United Kingdom


Thanks everyone! I'll be taking all your advice on board. Knowing where I went wrong can only help me improve.
Mark, I think saying that you 'wouldn't suggest putting much hope/energy into it' is a little harsh and discouraging when it's something I obviously really want to get into.
Jan 10 13 07:45 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
RachelReilly
Posts: 1,699
Washington, District of Columbia, US


I disagree with mark, I think you have a beautiful look.( although you are too short for any serious high fashion or runway work)
But that is not what makes the model , practice practice practice posing and facial expression so that your modeling looks believable.
Your pictures as well as modeling skills look very amateur so I would highly suggest hiring a really experienced photographer to coach you and bring out the best in you
Best of luck!
Jan 10 13 07:55 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
AshGold29
Posts: 6
Huddersfield, England, United Kingdom


Rachel Reilly wrote:
I disagree with mark, I think you have a beautiful look.( although you are too short for any serious high fashion or runway work)
But that is not what makes the model , practice practice practice posing and facial expression so that your modeling looks believable.
Your pictures as well as modeling skills look very amateur so I would highly suggest hiring a really experienced photographer to coach you and bring out the best in you
Best of luck!

Thank you very much. Yeah unfortunately a little on the short side, and I don't think I have the right look for high fashion.
Great, I can't wait to do that and update my portfolio. I was thinking of paying for a shoot with Spot Studio in London (a studio for aspiring models where they 'train' you for the day), or just continue doing tfp's and hope to get a better few shots out of it.

Jan 10 13 07:58 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Charlie-CNP
Posts: 2,619
New York, New York, US


my 2 cents, if you are interested in trying modeling, you would be better off starting with a simple head shot, 3/4, full length, and profile to pitch to commercial agencies. MM is not the place to do serious modeling. Your look is also more commercial than not, and generally if agencies hire you, they don't care if you know what you are doing or not and will train you or place you with experienced photographers that know how to pose a model properly. check out http://www.newmodels.com to get started (lots of helpful info here). good luck
Jan 10 13 08:11 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Charlie-CNP
Posts: 2,619
New York, New York, US


Mark wrote:
Hi Sarah,  sorry to say but no I don't think you have much potential to work as a model. The good news is I don't know all that much about working on MM but more about agency modeling (including London where I worked for over 4 months).

You are right to say commercial is more appropriate for you, but even still I wouldn't suggest putting much hope/energy into it.  If you do keep pursuing it- then do more commercial style shots which these are not.  More life style- having fun smiles, more personality.  Try shooting outdoors or on location- cafes, house, gym etc.  I think your wardrobe is not right either- so study the catologs/web sites or Jcrew, Banana Republic, Anthropology, Theory, Urban Outfitters and the advertising aimed at teens.

Your make up should be pretty natural natural.  In some of these pics your hair is not flattering- not well groomed or styled.

As for poses- a lot of that reflects the level of experience of the photographer that you are working with.  I would coach you through the shoot, I wouldnt put you on that chair as in your first shot- it serves no one well- the dress is not being highlighted, you look a little thick in the waist, etc. AND never ever put a hand across your abdomen as it looks like you are trying to conceal a belly bulge.

You can tear out magazine photos of poses and photography that you like and keep in a folder and then bring that with you when you interview to shoot with some one as possibilities and then keep them on the set to refer to/ remind you.

Mark

p.s. What Mark wrote may sound harsh to you, but it is the truth of the way the industry works. There are many that "want to be models", but actually making it is a very different story which is why I suggest going directly to apply to agencies instead of wasting time to be up front.

Jan 10 13 08:16 pm  Link  Quote 
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