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Photographer
AmberHerrera
Posts: 96
Eureka Springs, Arkansas, US


What are the best tips for coaching a model. I've read and watched videos, but I would like to know from your first hand experience. (Coaching for Fashion)   

Things I've learned....

Suggest an action as opposed to a "pose" Most of the time you'll achieve more natural movement especially from a new model.

Eye lines:  At camera, at/toward light source, closed, or down the body.

Neck: the obvious, make it as long as possible.


Are these correct? Or am I getting the wrong information?  Being in Arkansas, there are no legitimate agencies for these girls to go to, to learn. So I decided to try my best and give them the most CORRECT information I can.   

Please if you have any other pointers, let me know. I'd hate to steer anyone wrong.
Feb 24 13 05:45 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Mark Salo
Posts: 8,351
Olney, Maryland, US


AmberHerrera wrote:
Suggest an action as opposed to a "pose" Most of the time you'll achieve more natural movement especially from a new model.

I like this.  Some models like to dance.  I often give the model a prop and tell her to work with it.  If she can't figure out what to do, I give her advice.

On the other hand, sometimes I suggest a pose and then tell the model to gradually modify it.

Feb 24 13 06:08 am  Link  Quote 
Model
angel emily
Posts: 1,020
Boston, Massachusetts, US


When on a work shoot, the photographer/client is usually very specific about what they want me to do (i.e., "we want you to stand here and act like this")...

When shooting creatives, the complaint I hear the most when working with photographers is that they have trouble finding models who can "move" -- i.e., they'll get into a good/comfortable pose and then just stand there.  If you're shooting creatives/for fun, I'd suggest finding experienced models who know how to move and take it upon themselves to know how.  I wouldn't have the slightest idea about how to teach this kind of thing -- it's always come natural to me.  I suppose some music might help some girls relax a bit.
Feb 24 13 06:13 am  Link  Quote 
guide forum
Model
Anna Adrielle
Posts: 18,763
Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium


If a photographer wants to coach me, I prefer visuals over him telling me things. so preferable example pics, or showing me on-camera what I was doing wrong/right in a certain picture, or even showing me the pose himself. much clearer than "okay so your right hand higher and your foot more to the side and your arm -nono other arm- more to the lift -no my left- ..."
Feb 24 13 07:19 am  Link  Quote 
Model
Anna Kl
Posts: 188
Toronto, Ontario, Canada


As models get more experience they will learn to flow the poses much more effectively instead of standing/sitting in the same position moving their head around, every now and then however i always find it very helpful when the photog (like mentioned above) get very specific to the pose he sees in his/her head and guides you through it, these make for some killer shots

but overall, models shall never forget where the lighting is and how it affects the body, i find that some dont even realize that if there is no light, there is a shadow..and then in half the pictures their face turns out dark because they were looking in the opposite direction (unless this is what you want)
-let them know that the light is  there and does not move for them, they have to work around the light to make it work in a flattering way

Let them know to surf through magazines and fashion websites, pick out a # of poses they like, practise them in the mirror and cut it down to maybe 6/7 poses that flatter them, AND that they can do well (couple this with various emotion and your model is set)

Last that I will mention is elongating the body, its sad to see even 5'8, 5'9 models that come up looking much shorter in photos because of choppy lines . (pointing toes, stretching your body, can sometimes be the make it or break it factor for this)

*LAST LAST -MUUSIIIC!
Feb 24 13 07:51 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
LA StarShooter
Posts: 1,852
Los Angeles, California, US


Anna Kl wrote:
As models get more experience they will learn to flow the poses much more effectively instead of standing/sitting in the same position moving their head around, every now and then however i always find it very helpful when the photog (like mentioned above) get very specific to the pose he sees in his/her head and guides you through it, these make for some killer shots

but overall, models shall never forget where the lighting is and how it affects the body, i find that some dont even realize that if there is no light, there is a shadow..and then in half the pictures their face turns out dark because they were looking in the opposite direction (unless this is what you want)
-let them know that the light is  there and does not move for them, they have to work around the light to make it work in a flattering way

Let them know to surf through magazines and fashion websites, pick out a # of poses they like, practise them in the mirror and cut it down to maybe 6/7 poses that flatter them, AND that they can do well (couple this with various emotion and your model is set)

Last that I will mention is elongating the body, its sad to see even 5'8, 5'9 models that come up looking much shorter in photos because of choppy lines . (pointing toes, stretching your body, can sometimes be the make it or break it factor for this)

*LAST LAST -MUUSIIIC!

Good advice. I've worked with a number of inexperienced models and my method is simple. I wrote a model guide. I send it to them and tell them it's copyrighted and its for their eyes only. One day I'll use it in a book.

I also send about 12-15 images of models posing that relate to the planned shoot. I bring those photos with me.

I direct and also point to general rules in posing. Often the model will start flowing like an experience model in some parts of the shoot as she has an idea of what she is doing and as she has seen the images we have created together she is often excited and will give you some surprisingly good poses.

One day I may just .pdf and sell the guide.

Feb 24 13 08:01 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
The Signature Image
Posts: 12,055
Gorham, Maine, US


Anna Adrielle wrote:
If a photographer wants to coach me, I prefer visuals over him telling me things. so preferable example pics, or showing me on-camera what I was doing wrong/right in a certain picture, or even showing me the pose himself. much clearer than "okay so your right hand higher and your foot more to the side and your arm -nono other arm- more to the lift -no my left- ..."

Absolutely. The last thing I want is a model moving and dancing all over the place.

I use a pose book. I either give the image to the model or show it to her on the computer screen and say let's do this.

I've found that models enjoy a clear definition of what I'm looking for and one pose, in some cases, will lead to another pose created by the model herself.

Yes, I do the "Move your hand here, or turn a little to the left," etc., but providing the model the basic pose sure helps.

Feb 24 13 08:28 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Marvelous Michigan Legs
Posts: 6
Farmington Hills, Michigan, US


I spend some time at the beginning of a first shoot for me with an inexperienced model with her in front of a full length mirror, and we just work on posing, no pictures yet.  It has been most beneficial to the models, and that shoot produces better images than otherwise would have been the case..  If a model has potential, I am glad to work with her on posing.
Feb 24 13 11:07 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
AmberHerrera
Posts: 96
Eureka Springs, Arkansas, US


Anna Adrielle wrote:
If a photographer wants to coach me, I prefer visuals over him telling me things. so preferable example pics, or showing me on-camera what I was doing wrong/right in a certain picture, or even showing me the pose himself. much clearer than "okay so your right hand higher and your foot more to the side and your arm -nono other arm- more to the lift -no my left- ..."

I am short and chubby, I usually use this method, I can't imagine what I look like, and what the girls think.. They probably go out for drinks and laugh..

Feb 24 13 02:34 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
AmberHerrera
Posts: 96
Eureka Springs, Arkansas, US


Anna Kl wrote:
As models get more experience they will learn to flow the poses much more effectively instead of standing/sitting in the same position moving their head around, every now and then however i always find it very helpful when the photog (like mentioned above) get very specific to the pose he sees in his/her head and guides you through it, these make for some killer shots

but overall, models shall never forget where the lighting is and how it affects the body, i find that some dont even realize that if there is no light, there is a shadow..and then in half the pictures their face turns out dark because they were looking in the opposite direction (unless this is what you want)
-let them know that the light is  there and does not move for them, they have to work around the light to make it work in a flattering way

Let them know to surf through magazines and fashion websites, pick out a # of poses they like, practise them in the mirror and cut it down to maybe 6/7 poses that flatter them, AND that they can do well (couple this with various emotion and your model is set)

Last that I will mention is elongating the body, its sad to see even 5'8, 5'9 models that come up looking much shorter in photos because of choppy lines . (pointing toes, stretching your body, can sometimes be the make it or break it factor for this)

*LAST LAST -MUUSIIIC!

Gotta have tuneage!!!

Feb 24 13 02:37 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
AmberHerrera
Posts: 96
Eureka Springs, Arkansas, US


LA StarShooter wrote:

Good advice. I've worked with a number of inexperienced models and my method is simple. I wrote a model guide. I send it to them and tell them it's copyrighted and its for their eyes only. One day I'll use it in a book.

I also send about 12-15 images of models posing that relate to the planned shoot. I bring those photos with me.

I direct and also point to general rules in posing. Often the model will start flowing like an experience model in some parts of the shoot as she has an idea of what she is doing and as she has seen the images we have created together she is often excited and will give you some surprisingly good poses.

One day I may just .pdf and sell the guide.

That is a great idea. A lookbook type of thing.

Feb 24 13 02:38 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Misty R H
Posts: 471
Anaheim, California, US


Here is a link to a very helpful website.  It has information about posing, make-up, types of modeling and even a list of agents. 

http://www.bobpardue.com/articles/secre … posing.htm

It is a very good site especially for young models just starting out.
Feb 25 13 09:35 am  Link  Quote 
Model
Misty R H
Posts: 471
Anaheim, California, US


dp
Feb 25 13 09:36 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
A Morris Photography
Posts: 56
Derby, England, United Kingdom


Show them what you want! Hop into the set with your subject and demonstrate.

Also, use objects as verbal cues instead of 'up, right, left, down' for example 'Look over there at those stairs', or 'point your knees at that chair, and look at the coatstand behind me'
Feb 25 13 09:46 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Ren Murray
Posts: 542
Salem, Oregon, US


I rarely work with experienced models, so much of what you see in my portfolio is a result of me helping with the poses. I do this by embarrassing myself and actually demonstrating the poses. I'm a 6'5" man, so it looks ridiculous when I do it, but that's generally good for a laugh and helps to keep the mood light during the shoot.

The best models I have worked with are dancers/performers because they have a body awareness that not everyone has.

The comment above about understanding the lighting is critical in my opinion. I often work with snoots and grids which are very directional and experienced models should know what those light modifiers do. If I have a snoot on your face and you turn, or move your face you leave your face in shadow.

Practice in front of a mirror and work on creating angles that are interesting. I like to create curves and triangles in my photos, and mix that with interesting lighting.
Feb 25 13 09:57 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
ontherocks
Posts: 22,548
Salem, Oregon, US


have an experienced model on set as a pose coach. they know the tricks of the trade. things like elongation. plus they can manhandle the model in a way that a guy can't get away with.
Feb 25 13 10:02 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Faces2Die4 Photography
Posts: 426
Houston, Texas, US


AmberHerrera wrote:
What are the best tips for coaching a model. I've read and watched videos, but I would like to know from your first hand experience. (Coaching for Fashion)   

. . . . . . .

Please if you have any other pointers, let me know. I'd hate to steer anyone wrong.

As stated above, it's often helpful to show the model an image of the pose you want. Here are some good posing lists to draw from:

http://www.modelmayhem.com/list/540614

http://www.modelmayhem.com/list/574525


I also keep this in my profile to assist my models with the fine art of posing:

MODELS: Click on Stewie - If You Dare!  wink

http://photos.modelmayhem.com/photos/130209/04/511642b85e19c_m.jpg

Cheers
John
F2D4

Feb 25 13 09:29 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Cherrystone
Posts: 36,642
Columbus, Ohio, US


Anna Kl wrote:
but overall, models shall never forget where the lighting is and how it affects the body

+100

If you do nothing else with a model, impress this upon them.

Of course that's assuming the photographer knows about light.

Feb 26 13 05:03 am  Link  Quote 
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