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Photographer
Delilah Monroe
Posts: 238
Manassas, Virginia, US


I love this effect.  Can someone help me figure out what techniques were used here?

http://500px.com/photo/5218708
Sep 02 13 08:41 pm  Link  Quote 
Retoucher
Krunoslav Stifter
Posts: 3,850
Santa Cruz, California, US


Can you be more specific as to what technique you are referring to exactly? The location, the bride, the angle, the lighting the post production?
Sep 02 13 09:19 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Leonard Gee Photography
Posts: 16,142
Sacramento, California, US


A great eye
Detailed location scouting
Exceptional styling
Terrific lighting/camera technique
Very knowledgeable post work
Sep 02 13 10:04 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Expression Unlimited
Posts: 1,125
San Diego, California, US


opening a window?


seriously ....what are you asking about?
Sep 02 13 10:47 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
1472
Posts: 1,058
Pembroke Pines, Florida, US


Delilah Monroe wrote:
I love this effect.  Can someone help me figure out what techniques were used here?

http://500px.com/photo/5218708

I can tell you but how much time and money do you have

Sep 02 13 10:52 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Dan OMell
Posts: 1,335
Charlotte, North Carolina, US


1) tripod
2) Brenizer method (4-6 frames with and with no woman, desirably manual exposure and manual focus for the light and DOF consistency of the future panorama)
3) shooting the fabric multiple times at different angles
4) removing any busy details
5) **compositing**
6) cleaning up
7) color grading

the same author's:
http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-cLChaQ6JQhk/UNtANaR08iI/AAAAAAAAD7M/PEl4uumfKlI/s400/189987_10200164287896154_1832096457_n.jpg

http://www.cuded.com/2012/09/wedding-ph … -stelmakh/
Sep 02 13 11:16 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
MC Seoul Photography
Posts: 411
Seoul, Seoul, Korea (South)


brenizer on things that are moving seems like a giant pain in the backside..
Sep 03 13 12:26 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Delilah Monroe
Posts: 238
Manassas, Virginia, US


Expression Unlimited wrote:
opening a window?


seriously ....what are you asking about?

Um, the awesome curtain-in-breeze effect?  Seriously, I thought that was obvious.

I think there was a little more to it than opening a window.  Just a guess.

Sep 03 13 05:37 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Delilah Monroe
Posts: 238
Manassas, Virginia, US


Dan OMell wrote:
1) tripod
2) Brenizer method (4-6 frames with and with no woman, desirably manual exposure and manual focus for the light and DOF consistency of the future panorama)
3) shooting the fabric multiple times at different angles
4) removing any busy details
5) **compositing**
6) cleaning up
7) color grading

the same author's:
http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-cLChaQ6JQhk/UNtANaR08iI/AAAAAAAAD7M/PEl4uumfKlI/s400/189987_10200164287896154_1832096457_n.jpg

http://www.cuded.com/2012/09/wedding-ph … -stelmakh/

An actual answer.  Thank-you.

Sep 03 13 05:38 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Delilah Monroe
Posts: 238
Manassas, Virginia, US


MC Seoul Photography wrote:
brenizer on things that are moving seems like a giant pain in the backside..

I agree that would be challenging.  Did you have another suggestion?

Sep 03 13 06:31 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Delilah Monroe
Posts: 238
Manassas, Virginia, US


Krunoslav-Stifter wrote:
Can you be more specific as to what technique you are referring to exactly? The location, the bride, the angle, the lighting the post production?

Uh, this is a digital retouching/art forum, correct? 

So yeah, post-production technique is what I'm looking for.

Sep 03 13 06:40 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Delilah Monroe
Posts: 238
Manassas, Virginia, US


Leonard Gee Photography wrote:
A great eye
Detailed location scouting
Exceptional styling
Terrific lighting/camera technique
Very knowledgeable post work

Could you be more specific about any one of those things, or were you just going to list the basic components of any great shot and avoid saying anything (I mean *anything*) that might be helpful to someone interested trying something like this?

Sep 03 13 09:49 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Dan OMell
Posts: 1,335
Charlotte, North Carolina, US


MC Seoul Photography wrote:
brenizer on things that are moving seems like a giant pain in the backside..

in this particular case, it's not at all. even if you skip a tripod. because the stitching process is totally automatic - a software gonna position all layers (after you picked up the most good-looking ones) properly for you. then you proceed with the most trivial masks possible to reveal / hide the selected pixels -- mostly making sure the curtains pieces are continuous. it's not like matte-painting, and you can use a hard brush and avoid being precise and meticulous (at least in this particular step).

actually, you can skip Brenizer method, and just mirror the left or right part of the scene, and then modify the copied part in liquify and/or free transform tools to make it looking different. but it's more hard to do. you can see some 'liquify' applied to curtains -- zoom in and look at the most compressed parts of the fabric.

there is a chance that the original color tones of the curtains were (dramatically) different, and color matching has been done in photoshop too. it's just easier.

there is a chance also that furniture elements or other accessories have been removed in post-processing too (by clone-stamping, for example, etc.)

basically, it's all about an initial idea and art and/or skills (depending on attitude) of compositing. you can find a lot of info (books, videos, articles, etc) about compositing and matte-painting online, one off the top of my head is here, for example.

personally, I don't see that this image was real (it does not even look particularly realistic perspective-wise, but it's great, no doubt about that), and it's not like the author just made some retouching of a real scene. it's definitely a composite.

Sep 03 13 10:30 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Smedley Whiplash
Posts: 17,297
Billings, Montana, US


The artist's body of work reminds me of Dave Hill's compositing style minus the grunge.

I'm envious that he gets wedding couples to put in that much effort.

In any case, the curtains might be as easy as an electric leaf blower, one or two frames  for each side to try to get the billow right. Even if the bride stood fairly still for 5-6 shots, only one layer might be needed for her, then a few for the curtains in a well lit room, and a shot for the sky, or a sky shot could be taken outdoors and then composited in.   (really, the whole thing could be done with as few as 3 total shots)

Once composited, then on to colorization and D&B, and maybe some masked adjustment layers to paint in saturation and local contrast.


If you go here you can see how most of the shooting was done (click on the links below the post)

http://stelmakh.com/backstage/?cat=3
Sep 03 13 11:06 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Delilah Monroe
Posts: 238
Manassas, Virginia, US


Dan OMell wrote:

in this particular case, it's not at all. even if you skip a tripod. because the stitching process is totally automatic - a software gonna position all layers (after you picked up the most good-looking ones) properly for you. then you proceed with the most trivial masks possible to reveal / hide the selected pixels -- mostly making sure the curtains pieces are continuous. it's not like matte-painting, and you can use a hard brush and avoid being precise and meticulous (at least in this particular step).

actually, you can skip Brenizer method, and just mirror the left or right part of the scene, and then modify the copied part in liquify and/or free transform tools to make it looking different. but it's more hard to do. you can see some 'liquify' applied to curtains -- zoom in and look at the most compressed parts of the fabric.

there is a chance that the original color tones of the curtains were (dramatically) different, and color matching has been done in photoshop too. it's just easier.

there is a chance also that furniture elements or other accessories have been removed in post-processing too (by clone-stamping, for example, etc.)

basically, it's all about an initial idea and art and/or skills (depending on attitude) of compositing. you can find a lot of info (books, videos, articles, etc) about compositing and matte-painting online, one off the top of my head is here, for example.

personally, I don't see that this image was real (it does not even look particularly realistic perspective-wise, but it's great, no doubt about that), and it's not like the author just made some retouching of a real scene. it's definitely a composite.

This was very helpful, thank-you for your input.

Sep 03 13 11:53 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Robert Randall
Posts: 13,842
Chicago, Illinois, US


You'll notice that the ends of all the flowing curtains have been cropped off. This could be as simple as two assistants pulling on string attached by clamp to the ends of the curtains. To my eye, the curtains look more pulled than blowing... I could be wrong, but we've done the same effect in studio in the past.

Just because there might be a simple explanation for how it was done, doesn't diminish the image in my eyes. I like it a lot.
Sep 03 13 12:02 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Delilah Monroe
Posts: 238
Manassas, Virginia, US


Robert Randall wrote:
You'll notice that the ends of all the flowing curtains have been cropped off. This could be as simple as two assistants pulling on string attached by clamp to the ends of the curtains. To my eye, the curtains look more pulled than blowing... I could be wrong, but we've done the same effect in studio in the past.

Just because there might be a simple explanation for how it was done, doesn't diminish the image in my eyes. I like it a lot.

I thought about that and I agree.  It makes the most sense. 

To me, it actually makes it more interesting.  The concept of making still things look as though they are in motion is sort of a neat trick I think.

Sep 03 13 12:43 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Robert Randall
Posts: 13,842
Chicago, Illinois, US


Delilah Monroe wrote:

I thought about that and I agree.  It makes the most sense. 

To me, it actually makes it more interesting.  The concept of making still things look as though they are in motion is sort of a neat trick I think.

You'll notice the inside sheer portion of the drapery is actually what gives a sense of flow to the image. Imagine the other drapes pull/clamped to a C-stand or an assistant, while someone else lifts and fluffs the shears. Pretty simple, and I bet it would be easy to get help from the brides maids.

Sep 03 13 12:49 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Delilah Monroe
Posts: 238
Manassas, Virginia, US


Robert Randall wrote:
You'll notice the inside sheer portion of the drapery is actually what gives a sense of flow to the image. Imagine the other drapes pull/clamped to a C-stand or an assistant, while someone else lifts and fluffs the shears. Pretty simple, and I bet it would be easy to get help from the brides maids.

It may even be the same curtain repeated several times at different levels to give it that layered effect.  Notice the other curtains in the background.  They almost look to sheer to have that many layers.

Sep 03 13 12:54 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
NickiSki
Posts: 88
Mattoon, Illinois, US


I think there have been some really good answers and conversation on this piece. I believe it would be a combination of the simple and several shots (Plus several higher tech things that I'm not versed in). As a model, I noticed that her veil is not blowing the same direction as the drapes, I'm not sure the window is open at all. To me, it looks as if it's a closed door around the frame. There is a slight blur on the floor around her, but no shadow from her. The sheers are too symmetrical to be blown where they are(which I noticed because of the veil), her dress isn't moving backwards at all. The chandelier isn't giving off the right kind of light from the angle of the shot of the bride. I think it's a beautiful piece. I have worked with several photographers on pieces like this. They are very time consuming...and SO worth it when you're done. Not always just multiple shots...sometimes multiple sessions. Love it.
Sep 04 13 12:01 pm  Link  Quote 
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