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Model
stephanie weller
Posts: 6
Fleet, England, United Kingdom


Hi everyone,

Wanted to see what you thought before I make any decisions. I'm thinking of quitting modelling completely as 2 years after coming off my agency I've realised I'm not getting enough work to match survival income.

Pros of modelling:
- Can promote new business through it indirectly (beauty brand)
- More money for college/uni
- Means I can afford little student luxuries
- Get to meet new people
- Get to travel
- Learn a lot of new skills and helps me boost self confidence and esteem.

Cons of modelling:
- Can't go full time due to college
- Under 18
- Will only do fashion, fitness, alternative
- Getting less and less work everytime I take old portfolio pictures down (Some were agency pictures at 12)
- I have to charge as can't do TF - it's impossible as need the money
- Flash can't be used on shoots (I have seizures)

Please look at my portfolio and website www.swellerofficial.wix.com/stephanie-weller and see what you think!

Many thanks,

Steph smile
Oct 13 13 09:11 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Jay Farrell
Posts: 13,030
Nashville, Tennessee, US


No idea what to tell you......except you have to be more flexible and industrious maybe.
Oct 13 13 10:32 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
udor
Posts: 22,026
New York, New York, US


stephanie weller wrote:
Please look at my portfolio and website www.swellerofficial.wix.com/stephanie-weller and see what you think!

Many thanks,

Steph smile

First... you have too many limiting situations (flash/seizures) etc. in your life, that I would consider.

Also, now, at 16 and 5'5", you might not grow much taller... which might be the ultimate breaking point for fashion.

My personal suggestion would be to put your modeling behind you as childhood experience and concentrate on a great academic education.

Good luck to you! smile

Oct 13 13 10:37 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
B R U N E S C I
Posts: 25,319
Bath, England, United Kingdom


stephanie weller wrote:
- Can't go full time due to college
- Under 18
- Will only do fashion, fitness, alternative

- Getting less and less work every time I take old portfolio pictures down (Some were agency pictures at 12)
- I have to charge as can't do TF - it's impossible as need the money
- Flash can't be used on shoots (I have seizures)

These all seem pretty insurmountable (at least until you're 18 for the first two).

A model who can't tolerate flash photography due to seizures is not likely to make much headway professionally, ever.

I would suggest that at 5'5" and given your other limitations you should concentrate on your education and continue to enjoy modelling on a TF basis from time to time as a fun hobby.

ETA: Damn! Udor beat me to it! big_smile


Just my $0.02

Ciao
Stefano
www.stefanobrunesci.com

Oct 13 13 10:41 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Hi_Spade Photography
Posts: 897
Darlington, South Carolina, US


The only thing I can think of is;

1). Quit modeling for a few years and go to school full time.

2). When you turn 18, you can start modeling again and shoot nudes (if you want) and maybe make more $$.

Just a few thoughts though. In the end, it's your choice smile.
Oct 13 13 10:41 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Yan Tan Tethera
Posts: 4,168
Biggleswade, England, United Kingdom


udor wrote:

First... you have too many limiting situations (flash/seizures) etc. in your life, that I would consider.

Also, now, at 16 and 5'5", you might not grow much taller... which might be the ultimate breaking point for fashion.

My personal suggestion would be to put your modeling behind you as childhood experience and concentrate on a great academic education.

Good luck to you! smile

Hi Stephanie, I'm afraid you don't have any other options.

Time to set your sites on something else. You have loads of potential. But it's not in modelling. Go girl.

Oct 13 13 10:50 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
M Pandolfo Photography
Posts: 12,116
Tampa, Florida, US


I think quitting would be the most reasonable option. I don't mean that to be harsh...but considering the extent of your limitations, given your height and body type, I can't imagine that you'd be getting a lot of TF*, let alone paid assignments.

If only the style of shoot you're willing to do were your only requirement, it would be virtually impossible to expect pay (for fashion or fitness at 5'5" and a body type that doesn't lend to those genres). But combine that with you are only interested in accepting paid work, can't tolerate flash...and your age? What is left that would compel a client/photographer to hire you?

You basically are a Minor only willing to perform paid fashion and fitness shoots done with natural light? What percentage of projects meet those requirements? Less than 1% I would suspect.

Concentrate and enjoy school. Find a more satisfying hobby.
Oct 13 13 10:53 am  Link  Quote 
guide forum
Model
Anna Adrielle
Posts: 18,762
Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium


then quit smile

And I mean this in a very encouraging way! I was in a position where I really wanted to quit half a year ago... so I did. And after a while, the motivation came back on its own, and now I'm more passionate than ever! It also gave me perspective on things. And funnily enough; now that I've let it go, I'm booking work again.

Sometimes taking a step back is the best thing you can do.

With your look, you're not going to go into agencymodeling or the "regular" fashion industry anyway (not a critique, I'm sure you already know this), so your age really isn't a huge asset anyway (as in: you won't waste valuable time if you quit for a while). Just take some time off, to do whatever you like, reflect on things, and I'm sure you'll find your way back after a while, and figure out a way to be succesful in it. You're young, you have the luxury of time, so use it.

good luck!
Oct 13 13 11:50 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Smitty s Photography
Posts: 80
Sacramento, California, US


udor wrote:

First... you have too many limiting situations (flash/seizures) etc. in your life, that I would consider.

Also, now, at 16 and 5'5", you might not grow much taller... which might be the ultimate breaking point for fashion.

My personal suggestion would be to put your modeling behind you as childhood experience and concentrate on a great academic education.

Good luck to you! smile

+1

Oct 13 13 12:08 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Patrick Walberg
Posts: 42,549
Salinas, California, US


Stephanie, I'm going to first assume that you are not talking about high fashion as you don't have the height or body shape for it.  When it comes to commercial print, and many other areas of modeling, I think you are quite lovely in personality and looks.  I would love to shoot with you, and since you've repeatedly worked with the same photographers.  Gymnastics and dance make for polished modeling ability in my book!  If you enjoy modeling, I see no reason why you should not pursue it since you have already been doing so as a fun hobby or side.

However, you mention making a full time income from modeling?  Well many are going to say it's not at all possible for you.  I would have to say that it's highly unlikely at this time for you to be able to do so.  Many of those who model or shoot pictures of models do so for fun and side income, but fewer are doing this as a living income.  Don't be fooled by the "Where professional models meet ..." about this website because it is very misleading! 

So it might suit you best to concentrate on school and take a break from modeling if needed.  You have a youthful face, and you are athletic, so if you want to give it a go for fun or a side income, you can certainly try it again later.  Do not stop your healthy exercise and diet routines though!  Best wishes!
Oct 13 13 01:12 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Patrick Walberg
Posts: 42,549
Salinas, California, US


Anna Adrielle wrote:
then quit smile

And I mean this in a very encouraging way! I was in a position where I really wanted to quit half a year ago... so I did. And after a while, the motivation came back on its own, and now I'm more passionate than ever! It also gave me perspective on things. And funnily enough; now that I've let it go, I'm booking work again.

Sometimes taking a step back is the best thing you can do.

With your look, you're not going to go into agencymodeling or the "regular" fashion industry anyway (not a critique, I'm sure you already know this), so your age really isn't a huge asset anyway (as in: you won't waste valuable time if you quit for a while). Just take some time off, to do whatever you like, reflect on things, and I'm sure you'll find your way back after a while, and figure out a way to be succesful in it. You're young, you have the luxury of time, so use it.

good luck!

Anna, I like what you say!  You rock!  smile

Oct 13 13 01:14 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Darik Datta
Posts: 118
Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada


This is a joke, right?

Of course you can't model if flashes give you seizures.
Oct 13 13 01:19 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
J O H N A L L A N
Posts: 9,861
Santa Ana, California, US


Yes - I'd let it go and remember it as a fun childhood experience.
The inability to tolerate flash just kills it really.

If you know photographers who do continuous light, there's no reason why you couldn't have fun with them for trade every so often.
But realistically - as any type of profession, it's not going to happen.
Oct 13 13 01:28 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Michael Bots
Posts: 5,619
Kingston, Ontario, Canada


TED Talk ---

Cameron Russell: Looks aren't everything. Believe me, I'm a model.
http://www.ted.com/talks/cameron_russel … model.html


http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/artic … think.html
"In it, she urges girls not to become models, describing it as 'not a career path' and criticises the effect that the relentless bombardment of images featuring young, skinny, white girls has on other women's self-esteem."

"Russell, who has modelled for more than a decade and has worked for Calvin Klein, Prada and Armani as well as Victoria's Secret, has made more than $3million from her work according to Forbes magazine."
Oct 13 13 01:30 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Patrick Walberg
Posts: 42,549
Salinas, California, US


Darik Datta wrote:
This is a joke, right?

Of course you can't model if flashes give you seizures.

Not true!  I know many musicians (most well known in Steely Dan), dancers, and models who have epilepsy that might be triggered by strobes, but continue to on with what they love doing regardless.

You don't have to use strobes for photography.  Anyone besides me use available or natural light, reflectors or lighting other than strobe?

Oct 13 13 01:42 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
AJScalzitti
Posts: 12,527
Atlanta, Georgia, US


Only do fashion and your not fashion stats?  That is like a blind person saying they will only join the air force if they can fly..
Oct 13 13 01:43 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Patrick Walberg
Posts: 42,549
Salinas, California, US


I just LOVE how negative people are around here as if we all make such a great living as fulltime models and photographers!  ROFLMAO!  What a joke!  How many of you here are making a good income from photography or modeling?  Or are you parroting what you hear all the time that is meant to discourage others?

Here is a young lady of 16 who has already been in pageants since 5 years old, signed with an agency as a child model, and been a member of a National Gymnastics team.  She is asking about making a "survivable income" in the near future or perhaps quitting?  One beautifully mature woman (Anna) who actually has the age and experience working as a model has given the OP a most realistic, yet positive comment.  I like what she said to the younger lady.

Stephanie, we don't know what a "survivalable income" is to you.  If it is necessary for you to put modeling on hold while concentrating on school and/or work , then that is what you need to do.  This website is NOT exclusive to professionals only as there are far more people who get into modeling and photography for fun, hobby or other motivation other than making money.  You can always come back and "give it a go" later on when you are ready.
Oct 13 13 02:05 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
DMesser Photography
Posts: 1,288
Oceanside, California, US


I wouldn't quit, but put modeling aside for a couple of years while you concentrate on schooling and on your diet.  After you turn 18, you can make extra money as a model working on your own doing nudes if you wish.  A lot of models make extra and sometimes good money doing this.  With your body, height, AGE and your not only doing paid work, it will be difficult for you now and fashion is out of the question.  I didn't mention the seizures since i've been epileptic for 60yrs.  Strobes bother me so I don't watch them and take my medicine religiously, don't drink or smoke.  In a couple of years you don't know the advances that will be made in that area, and you can work with photographers who use lighting instead of flashes of any kind and you can model indoors as well as outdoors.   Hope this helps you.  Don
Oct 13 13 02:12 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
AJScalzitti
Posts: 12,527
Atlanta, Georgia, US


Patrick Walberg wrote:
I just LOVE how negative people are around here as if we all make such a great living as fulltime models and photographers!  ROFLMAO!  What a joke!  How many of you here are making a good income from photography or modeling?  Or are you parroting what you hear all the time that is meant to discourage others?

I am doing just fine, but I don't know what your issues have to do with the OPs question or concerns.

Oct 13 13 02:15 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Patrick Walberg
Posts: 42,549
Salinas, California, US


Michael Bots wrote:
TED Talk ---

Cameron Russell: Looks aren't everything. Believe me, I'm a model.
http://www.ted.com/talks/cameron_russel … model.html


http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/artic … think.html
"In it, she urges girls not to become models, describing it as 'not a career path' and criticises the effect that the relentless bombardment of images featuring young, skinny, white girls has on other women's self-esteem."

"Russell, who has modeled for more than a decade and has worked for Calvin Klein, Prada and Armani as well as Victoria's Secret, has made more than $3million from her work according to Forbes magazine."

I've watched this video before, and it is very powerful and thought provoking!  I like Cameron Russell and her blunt honesty.   Really, modeling and photography are nothing more than activities that we do to varying degrees of success.  Much of it has to do with how good we are at accenting the positive, and hiding what we don't want others to see.

Never give too much weight on what the naysayers say!  I'm not saying that public opinion and hearing the negative isn't important, but one should balance their own life with keeping in mind what makes them happy with what provides what they need to survive.

Oct 13 13 02:18 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Photo Bill
Posts: 275
Baltimore, Maryland, US


udor wrote:

First... you have too many limiting situations (flash/seizures) etc. in your life, that I would consider.

Also, now, at 16 and 5'5", you might not grow much taller... which might be the ultimate breaking point for fashion.

My personal suggestion would be to put your modeling behind you as childhood experience and concentrate on a great academic education.

Good luck to you! smile

This is the best advice you will get!

Oct 13 13 02:18 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Patrick Walberg
Posts: 42,549
Salinas, California, US


AJScalzitti wrote:
Only do fashion and your not fashion stats?  That is like a blind person saying they will only join the air force if they can fly..

It's "you're" not fashion stats, and she wrote "... do fashion, fitness and alternative."   And it's not like she is just starting out either.

Oct 13 13 02:25 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
udor
Posts: 22,026
New York, New York, US


Patrick Walberg wrote:
It's "you're" not fashion stats, and she wrote "... do fashion, fitness and alternative."   And it's not like she is just starting out either.

Yeah... but... Patrick... will she make a living as a fitness or alternative model???

The only fitness models that I know, are making money by shooting commercials for fitness products and nutritional supplements... and their physicality is a bodyfat percentage in the single digits, with six pack abs and are winning a huge amount of fitness competitions.

The full time earnings potential of alt models, unless you do more adult oriented stuff (including nudes) is also rather non-existent...

Nobody said she shouldn't do it as a hobby... but her question was not if she should model as a hobby... it was to make a full time living, with income fully derived from modeling and to quit if she can't do it.

If you tell her that she can do it... will you cover her expenses when she follows your advise and falls behind in her rent and food?

I know a few guys, who were GAP babies... they tried to continue modeling as adults... but... GAP won't look at them anymore now...

Some things from the childhood, will have to stay in the childhood... I used to be really good looking with bright blond hair as a kid... now... I am me... with graying hair... wink

Oct 13 13 02:40 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
ME_
Posts: 3,133
Atlanta, Georgia, US


Patrick Walberg wrote:
Never give too much weight on what the naysayers say!

Why do you consider those who answered the OP's question with their opinions - which is exactly what she asked them to do - to be "naysayers"?

My opinion is: OP, if you want to model as a hobby, then continue. You don't have the height, look, or stats to be a fashion or fitness or alternative model. You are too young to do nudes and you have medical issues that will GREATLY limit your ability to shoot with anyone on a professional campaign of any kind. Yes there are some photographers who use natural light. Try making a survival income off them alone. You'll make more money working part-time in a shop over the course of a couple of years.

You've got some kind of business you're working on? Focus on that. That too probably has more possibility of making money for a longer period of time than modeling does.

Have fun with modeling when you can and figure out what you want to do and realistically can do for the rest of your life.

Oct 13 13 02:53 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
Magda Kulpinska
Posts: 527
Paris, Île-de-France, France


Look, you don't have to quit - if you get paid offers why not accept them?

If you feel taking down old pictures and replacing them by new ones brings you less jobs then the reasons might be one (or both) of two:

1) Your old pictures were of better quality, taken by better photographers than your current work

2) You changed and are less marketable in your niche at this point (which, if it's the case, doesn't have to be a bad thing at all and doesn't mean there won't be further changes that will turn this around).

The seizures are a lot more of a serious issue though - you shouldn't mess around with your health and if a photographer can't shoot with flash it limits their possibilities.
Oct 13 13 03:07 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Patrick Walberg
Posts: 42,549
Salinas, California, US


udor wrote:
Yeah... but... Patrick... will she make a living as a fitness or alternative model???

The only fitness models that I know, are making money by shooting commercials for fitness products and nutritional supplements... and their physicality is a bodyfat percentage in the single digits, with six pack abs and are winning a huge amount of fitness competitions.

The full time earnings potential of alt models, unless you do more adult oriented stuff (including nudes) is also rather non-existent...

Nobody said she shouldn't do it as a hobby... but her question was not if she should model as a hobby... it was to make a full time living, with income fully derived from modeling and to quit if she can't do it.

If you tell her that she can do it... will you cover her expenses when she follows your advise and falls behind in her rent and food?

I know a few guys, who were GAP babies... they tried to continue modeling as adults... but... GAP won't look at them anymore now...

Some things from the childhood, will have to stay in the childhood... I used to be really good looking with bright blond hair as a kid... now... I am me... with graying hair... wink

I totally respect what you are saying, Udor, and I'm not filling her head with pipe dreams either. 

The fact is that she is only 16 and a lot can happen in the next couple years.  Of course she is not even close to what I think of as "Alternative models" because I think of mature women with tattoos and piercings .. which I have photographed before in doing Alternative work.  She has a decent start at fitness modeling, as she is flexible and athletic, but does not have the build of an "Athletic" model ... yet!  And at 16 years of age, she does not have the height or proper measurements to do high fashion ... but could do commercial print and other sides of fashion including parts modeling perhaps.  I make no bones about it, for her to do any of this and make a decent income will take lots of work on her part!  You and I don't know what the future holds, so any or all of us could be dead wrong either direction as to what happens in a couple years. 

I never said that I would support her financially.  I've even discouraged her from thinking if modeling in the terms of making her primary income.  What I read is her putting some pro's and con's towards her modeling ... and asking opinions.  I've given my opinions for better or worse.

Oct 13 13 03:26 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
MB JenB
Posts: 2,910
Clarksville, Tennessee, US


stephanie weller wrote:
Hi everyone,

Wanted to see what you thought before I make any decisions. I'm thinking of quitting modelling completely as 2 years after coming off my agency I've realised I'm not getting enough work to match survival income.

Pros of modelling:
- Can promote new business through it indirectly (beauty brand)
- More money for college/uni
- Means I can afford little student luxuries
- Get to meet new people
- Get to travel
- Learn a lot of new skills and helps me boost self confidence and esteem.

Cons of modelling:
- Can't go full time due to college
- Under 18
- Will only do fashion, fitness, alternative
- Getting less and less work everytime I take old portfolio pictures down (Some were agency pictures at 12)
- I have to charge as can't do TF - it's impossible as need the money
- Flash can't be used on shoots (I have seizures)

Please look at my portfolio and website www.swellerofficial.wix.com/stephanie-weller and see what you think!

Many thanks,

Steph smile

Hi Steph,

When you "come back" to modeling and photography, (after uni/college,) you'll likely have a renewed vigor and enjoyment for it and, one way to avoid the flash is to experiement in self-portraiture where you do not have flash? This may be a way of self expression, art and... a hobby.

Granted I may be just talking of my own wishes as this is an area I want to shoot in too.

Besides, knowing that it is going to be there for you when you finish school may help to alleviate the void in your life from not modeling and creating. smile

Jen

Oct 13 13 03:27 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Patrick Walberg
Posts: 42,549
Salinas, California, US


ME_ wrote:
Why do you consider those who answered the OP's question with their opinions - which is exactly what she asked them to do - to be "naysayers"?

My opinion is: OP, if you want to model as a hobby, then continue. You don't have the height, look, or stats to be a fashion or fitness or alternative model. You are too young to do nudes and you have medical issues that will GREATLY limit your ability to shoot with anyone on a professional campaign of any kind. Yes there are some photographers who use natural light. Try making a survival income off them alone. You'll make more money working part-time in a shop over the course of a couple of years.

You've got some kind of business you're working on? Focus on that. That too probably has more possibility of making money for a longer period of time than modeling does.

Have fun with modeling when you can and figure out what you want to do and realistically can do for the rest of your life.

I meant in general, not anyone specifically.   Those of us who post on the forum here have a reputation of being rather negative on those Facebook pages that are related to this site.  Like the OP here, I try to consider the "pros and cons" of situations.  I try not to candy coat anything, but then I also "never say never" either!  lol

By the way, I have medical issues that should GREATLY limit my ability to be alive and posting on here.  However I overcame near death, so that might have something to do with my attitude.   I'm still alive, and have my eyesite, so I'll continue to shoot pictures when I can.  My main income has come from disability/workers comp as of late, but I have made my living as a photographer in past years.   wink

Oct 13 13 03:32 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
AJScalzitti
Posts: 12,527
Atlanta, Georgia, US


Patrick Walberg wrote:

It's "you're" not fashion stats, and she wrote "... do fashion, fitness and alternative."   And it's not like she is just starting out either.

On my phone it's whatever autocorrect decided and the point is the same.  Not everyone is cut out to be a model, psychically or emotionally, it's not the end of the world.

Oct 13 13 03:45 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Brhum
Posts: 82
Burlington, Ontario, Canada


When I was about 10, I sat a test at school which determined I was colour-blind at multiple points in the spectrum. They were blunt and honest - you cannot go into the following areas of work - electrician (colour coded wires, resistors are colour coded etc.), pharmacy (again something to do with colour coding used), the Royal Air Force, etc. I remember being disappointed but not angry or particularly upset - the truth was the truth. A letter went to my parents saying "hey, you need to steer you son away from these professions otherwise he'll be wasting his time because he simply can't do it."

Photography has its challenges for me. I know there's stuff I read about in Photoshop that I'll never be able to do because I'm just not seeing it. I have printed canvases which had to be thrown away because I messed up skin tones. Nowadays someone checks my stuff for me before it goes out and I would say 1 in 5 images needs to be corrected.

I cannot offer you any specific advice except do not begrudge those that are offering you a realistic interpretation of the modelling world. Let this thread run its course, read the responses carefully and then make the call. You may choose to avoid those options that are simply a step beyond, you may find a niche that works for you and that you can derive whatever happiness or fulfillment you desire.

I see no negativity here, perhaps a lot of tough-love, realism and insight. Whatever you choose, you did the right thing by asking but the next step is yours.
Oct 13 13 03:56 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Mark Salo
Posts: 8,152
Olney, Maryland, US


Can't stand flash?  Westcott Spiderlites are becoming quite popular around here.
Oct 13 13 04:05 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Patrick Walberg
Posts: 42,549
Salinas, California, US


AJScalzitti wrote:

On my phone it's whatever autocorrect decided and the point is the same.  Not everyone is cut out to be a model, psychically or emotionally, it's not the end of the world.

I can't help myself sometimes!  Forgive me, as my dad was an English teacher and a sports coach at the high school and college level! 

You are correct that we all have our limitations.  She seems to have an analytical mind as she listed some pro and cons along with asking for our thoughts.  I would like to know what her thoughts are further as she has not commented after her original post.  She has had some good experiences in the past, and that is why I would hold on to hope for her future success.  However "success" and "survivable income" are defined by each of us differently. 

I think that there is always room for improvement of her portfolio, but then she did not ask for a critique ... so I must not go there.  Can she make an income modeling?  Well that depends on more factors than what we've had to discuss here including how much she actually needs to make.   How much enjoyment does she get from modeling is also a factor that she should take in consideration.

Oct 13 13 04:19 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
JTP QC
Posts: 10
Moline, Illinois, US


I have to say what a few others have said. And I truly mean this as nicely as possible, you are pretty, but you just don't have the look to give modeling a go as a career. Not many people do. Hell, there's a reason I am behind the camera and not in front of it!
Oct 13 13 04:20 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Marin Photography NYC
Posts: 7,037
New York, New York, US


Best of luck whatever you do.
Oct 13 13 04:29 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Patrick Walberg
Posts: 42,549
Salinas, California, US


Brhum wrote:
When I was about 10, I sat a test at school which determined I was colour-blind at multiple points in the spectrum. They were blunt and honest - you cannot go into the following areas of work - electrician (colour coded wires, resistors are colour coded etc.), pharmacy (again something to do with colour coding used), the Royal Air Force, etc. I remember being disappointed but not angry or particularly upset - the truth was the truth. A letter went to my parents saying "hey, you need to steer you son away from these professions otherwise he'll be wasting his time because he simply can't do it."

Photography has its challenges for me. I know there's stuff I read about in Photoshop that I'll never be able to do because I'm just not seeing it. I have printed canvases which had to be thrown away because I messed up skin tones. Nowadays someone checks my stuff for me before it goes out and I would say 1 in 5 images needs to be corrected.

I cannot offer you any specific advice except do not begrudge those that are offering you a realistic interpretation of the modelling world. Let this thread run its course, read the responses carefully and then make the call. You may choose to avoid those options that are simply a step beyond, you may find a niche that works for you and that you can derive whatever happiness or fulfillment you desire.

I see no negativity here, perhaps a lot of tough-love, realism and insight. Whatever you choose, you did the right thing by asking but the next step is yours.

You are certainly not the only color blind photographer around!  My buddy who does photography is also color blind, and he is an EMT also!  I know that there are things that you can do when it comes to a lot of EMT and/or photography related stuff to overcome it!  Good for you!

We ALL have limitations!  My dad had coached some high school basketball teams to the State Championships back in the day.  My dad has since passed away, but his lessons remain in my mind.  He would say that you've got to have "balance" in life as in sports.  You've got to be aware of what others are doing, especially with team sports, but not so much as to effect your own personal best.  The key being "personal best!"   Knowing what you are capable of will only help you to overcome those limitations!  Rock on brother!  borat

Oct 13 13 04:30 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
MB JenB
Posts: 2,910
Clarksville, Tennessee, US


Patrick Walberg wrote:
...
The fact is that she is only 16 and a lot can happen in the next couple years. ...

And at 16 years of age, she does not have the height or proper measurements to do high fashion ... but could do commercial print and other sides of fashion including parts modeling perhaps.  I make no bones about it, for her to do any of this and make a decent income will take lots of work on her part!  You and I don't know what the future holds, so any or all of us could be dead wrong either direction as to what happens in a couple years. 

...

As a side note, generally women stop increasing in height once menstruation starts, whereas men potentially can continue to increase for years beyond puberty.

At 16 years old I was 5'11" and at 18 I did peak at 5'11.75", (I know this because I was hoping to make 6'!) However now I am only 5'10.5".

It isn't necessarily likely that she will gain inches in height but, wow on her athleticism.
Jen

Oct 13 13 04:37 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
AJScalzitti
Posts: 12,527
Atlanta, Georgia, US


Patrick Walberg wrote:

I can't help myself sometimes!  Forgive me, as my dad was an English teacher and a sports coach at the high school and college level!

Try marrying one big_smile

Our OP will be fine, she obviously has plans for attending a university

Oct 13 13 04:43 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Patrick Walberg
Posts: 42,549
Salinas, California, US


MyrnaByrna Jen B wrote:

As a side note, generally women stop increasing in height once menstruation starts, whereas men potentially can continue to increase for years beyond puberty.

At 16 years old I was 5'11" and at 18 I did peak at 5'11.75", (I know this because I was hoping to make 6'!) However now I am only 5'10.5".

It isn't necessarily likely that she will gain inches in height but, wow on her athleticism.
Jen

The vast majority of models that I photograph are well below 5' 10" ... probably an average height of 5' 4" over all.  I've shot many models who are 5'2 ... but it all depends on what we are shooting for.  The woman in my avatar happens to be 5' 5" and close to all Marilyn Monroe's other measurements too.  Becca was spot on as a Marilyn Monroe impersonator in fact!  She was perhaps the best model/actress I've ever worked with! 

So my point being that of course being tall can be quite an advantage when it comes to high fashion, but it is not the one and absolute requirement to do modeling, even on the catwalk. 

That we don't know what she considers to be an acceptable income level is one thing, but another is that her body shape can also change for the better or worse from being a 16 year young lady to a full grown 20 something years young woman! She is not where she is going to have to be if she has goals of doing either alternative or athletic modeling on a serious basis.   It's going to take a lot of hard work, and I don't know if she has what it takes if she is doubting herself now?  That is why I suggest a break, but to keep active. 

The other thing is don't focus on the income, but on setting your own personal goals, and doing what you enjoy doing ... I'd say that to anyone who models or does photography.

Oct 13 13 05:00 pm  Link  Quote 
Model
stephanie weller
Posts: 6
Fleet, England, United Kingdom


Hi everyone,

Thanks for the advice and I thought I'd just clear up on a few things:

- I've decided not to quit as such, but take tfp work alongside paid work to build a stronger portfolio
- I got told to take down older photos as I quite clearly looked under 16 in them and was banned for a while
- In terms of survival income - If I did 10 hours shooting a month at current rates I'd be just reaching it (it works out at £250 a month on top of bursaries and family help).
- As for the flash problem, as it only started a few months back and well after I started having seizures, I'm hoping it's a temporary thing. I've asked gran to take part in an experiment with me which means taking everyday family photos with flash in different lighting levels to see how much I can tolerate and when.

Steph smile
Oct 13 13 05:16 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Patrick Walberg
Posts: 42,549
Salinas, California, US


stephanie weller wrote:
Hi everyone,

Thanks for the advice and I thought I'd just clear up on a few things:

- I've decided not to quit as such, but take tfp work alongside paid work to build a stronger portfolio
- I got told to take down older photos as I quite clearly looked under 16 in them and was banned for a while
- In terms of survival income - If I did 10 hours shooting a month at current rates I'd be just reaching it (it works out at £250 a month on top of bursaries and family help).
- As for the flash problem, as it only started a few months back and well after I started having seizures, I'm hoping it's a temporary thing. I've asked gran to take part in an experiment with me which means taking everyday family photos with flash in different lighting levels to see how much I can tolerate and when.

Steph smile

You have a good head on your shoulders! Doing selective TFP with some photographers is a good idea.  It seems that your education and your health take priority, as it should.  Best wishes!

Oct 13 13 08:27 pm  Link  Quote 
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