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Photographer
PhotoEclat
Posts: 195
Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland


i would like to add cigarette smoke to a photo of mine but don't know how to go best about it......any suggestions?
Nov 08 12 12:03 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
NothingIsRealButTheGirl
Posts: 32,436
Los Angeles, California, US


find a 'brush' of cigarette smoke. Use that. But be careful with brushes, they lead to monochromatic work. Your smoke may end up as just shades of gray with no color variation.

If it's a color image you are making, notice the smoke color. It often tends to be blueish. Not just white.

http://ecology.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/Tobacco-Smoke-Havard-edu.JPG

Might want to use curves so that the darker parts of the smoke have a little more saturation.
Nov 08 12 12:07 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
NothingIsRealButTheGirl
Posts: 32,436
Los Angeles, California, US


Shoot your own smoke in a dark room. Backlight it.

You might try using the white smoke on black as a layer mask, and painting your color into the top layer itself.
Nov 08 12 12:08 pm  Link  Quote 
Digital Artist
Koray
Posts: 6,685
Ankara, Ankara, Turkey


I dont really like it but:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=crkrCDzD4Zg

or you can get some smoke stocks from like sxc:
http://www.sxc.hu/browse.phtml?f=search&w=1&txt=smoke

and use screen blend mode if they are against balck bg.
for some weird reason if the bg is white invert and then use screen. desaturate if needed too smile
Nov 08 12 12:21 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Jacob Davis
Posts: 857
Boulder, Colorado, US


cgtextures.com has a lot of very nice, free to download smoke stock images. Grab one, paste it in as a layer, set to screen blending, transform, and tweak contrast/color as you like.
Nov 08 12 12:28 pm  Link  Quote 
Retoucher
Peano
Posts: 4,106
Lynchburg, Virginia, US


http://qbrushes.net/photoshop-abstract- … brush-set/

No need to complicate this. One click with a smoke brush:
http://i1005.photobucket.com/albums/af171/retouch46/cigarette.gif
Nov 08 12 02:00 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Hugh O Malley
Posts: 68
Shenzhen, Guangdong, China


PhotoEclat wrote:
i would like to add cigarette smoke to a photo of mine but don't know how to go best about it......any suggestions?

I shot a load recently for a personal project.  They're all against a black background.  If you want a few i can provide.

alternatively if you use a low opacity white brush on a new layer and liquify (maybe swirl it)  and smudge the smoke around you can get some nice effects.

This is a really good tutorial on shooting smoke:

http://sensitivelight.com/photographingsmoke/

maybe he goes into a little bit too much detail but better too much info than too little in this case.  contact me if you want to see some of my shots.

otherwise i have some smoke textures or try deviantart.com for textures.

Nov 08 12 03:08 pm  Link  Quote 
Retoucher
Rpixretouching
Posts: 355
Perris, California, US


don't hesitate shooting smoke, if you don't know how to mask it out  It will be another Difficut task . best bet is to use a brush as Peano suggested you. good luck.
Nov 08 12 06:08 pm  Link  Quote 
Retoucher
Alena Hovorkova
Posts: 123
Brno, Jihomoravsky, Czech Republic


.. not sure wheather you are asking about shooting smoke - or about post-production technique (I only have answer for post-work).

For ´smoke images´ (white/light smoke on black background) the Screen Blend mode can be used (pretty effectivelly, and quickly, one-click basically) to get rid of black background - as others have already said/showed.

The reason /the answer why is that possible/ is that the Screen Blend mode is ´capable of ignoring´ blacks. In other words - it makes all black pixels ´invisible/transparent´ (very ´simplified´ definition of how this particular blend mode works, just to keep explanation simple here). So - the darker/blacker the background on the initial smoke image, the better/cleaner the effect will work.

(Just as a side note - the ´same´ applies/works for Multiply blend mode, too - just in the opposite way. Meaning: while with Screen you can easily get rid of black background, with Multiply - analogically - you can just as well get rid of white background. Multiply and Screen are the opposite/complementary blend modes, technically - which is practical to know especially when working with positive/negative versions of the same image, for example. Getting rid of uniform backgrounds - either white or black - is just one random example of how this ´duality´/complementarity´can be used/useful.)
   
But - this is usually just the first step in a workflow, actually - in case you want to achieve ´convincing/real-looking´ illusion of a smoke incporporated into new image, since - with Screen mode - you might/will also loose/sacrifice some other important information from the Smoke layer (blueish color cast, for example) - that - actualy - needs to be ´recovered´ back.

There are a few different possible ways how to do it (depending on the image, level of transparency, type of background image etc.). In general - probably the easiest one - is just copying the Smoke layer one more time (above the Screen layer) -  set the copy in in ´Normal´ or ´Color´ mode this time (depending on the image and/or the effect to be achieved) - completely mask/hide with a layer mask - and than just softly reveal back (unmask) those parts that need to be ´recovered´.
(But - you still might need some more ´recovering/tweaking´ steps to apply, so as also the contrast is enhanced, etc. .. )

Here´s an example - just to show that/how it works even for different backgrounds.
Original image: white smoke on black background. Green background added here, beneath/below the Smoke layer (set in Screen). Some more further ´enhancing´ (contrast, edges) applied here, too.

http://www.ahdesign.cz/images2010/postproduction/PS_masking_demo/kour.jpg
Nov 08 12 11:27 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Downtown Pro Photo
Posts: 1,547
Crystal Lake, Illinois, US


Shoot some smoke from incense stick against a black back ground.  Side light them with a gridded softbox.  Gentle air motions to get the shape. Spin your hand slowly above it to get spirals, small circles on the side for more billowy. 
Place the final image with the black background onto the image you want to add smoke into, set the blend mode to screen and the black disappears leaving only the smoke.

Vary your exposure to  get different looks on the smoke.  Stop down to get thinner strands, open up for more volume in the smoke.
Focus before you shoot, it's hard for cameras to focus on smoke.  Then shoot some out of focus to blend in with in focus smoke, that gives it a sense of depth when done subtly.
Nov 09 12 10:42 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
NothingIsRealButTheGirl
Posts: 32,436
Los Angeles, California, US


Nov 12 12 05:13 pm  Link  Quote 
Digital Artist
Andreea Cernestean
Posts: 495
Baia Mare, Maramureş, Romania


Find a smoke stock image isolated on a black background. Open in Photoshop, copy it over your image, set layer mode to "Screen" and size & place where you need it to be.
Nov 13 12 02:56 am  Link  Quote 
Retoucher
Kristiana-Retouch
Posts: 289
London, England, United Kingdom


If your smoke is on black background then, as said above, try to change blending modes, probably screen will work the best.
Nov 13 12 08:03 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
NothingIsRealButTheGirl
Posts: 32,436
Los Angeles, California, US


http://www.digitalartform.com/assets/ScreenVsLayerMask_2.gif

If the smoke in a comp is meant to obscure, sometimes the screen blend mode creates too transparent an effect. In that case, try using the smoke on black as a layer mask for a pale gray layer.
Nov 13 12 09:28 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
D0127H
Posts: 1,135
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada


PhotoEclat wrote:
i would like to add cigarette smoke to a photo of mine but don't know how to go best about it......any suggestions?

Shoot smoke on black.  Screen it in.
Good luck D

Nov 13 12 09:29 am  Link  Quote 
Digital Artist
Koray
Posts: 6,685
Ankara, Ankara, Turkey


OP still couldnt figure it out from what I see checking his portfolio big_smile
Nov 13 12 10:17 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
annie lomowitz
Posts: 257
WOODY CREEK, Colorado, US


cocein scarlet on the base of the film ... fine wet.//. oops you mean digital
Nov 13 12 02:50 pm  Link  Quote 
Retoucher
Noodleputer
Posts: 13
San Diego, California, US


I try not to use stock photos if I don't have too. The best way I believe is to make your own smoke via photoshop.


Use a paint brush, color white. Set the opacity to however you want and pain the general shape. Now to actually make it flow like smoke, I use 2 tools. Smudge (change the pressure to how you like) and liquify. If you're not use to creating/drawing things by hand, this might be slightly difficult, but its the best way to have control over everything. Just give it a try.
Nov 13 12 03:30 pm  Link  Quote 
Retoucher
Peano
Posts: 4,106
Lynchburg, Virginia, US


Noodleputer wrote:
Use a paint brush, color white. Set the opacity to however you want and pain the general shape. Now to actually make it flow like smoke, I use 2 tools. Smudge (change the pressure to how you like) and liquify. If you're not use to creating/drawing things by hand, this might be slightly difficult, but its the best way to have control over everything. Just give it a try.

Give this a try.

There seem to be an inordinate number of Rube Goldgerg's descendants posting suggestions on this topic.

Nov 13 12 04:31 pm  Link  Quote 
Retoucher
Noodleputer
Posts: 13
San Diego, California, US


Peano wrote:

Give this a try.

There seem to be an inordinate number of Rube Goldgerg's descendants posting suggestions on this topic.

Not all pre-made brushes look good or even match with photos. My suggestion doesn't actually take that long, if anything maybe equivalent to the same amount of time you'd spend looking for "just the right brush" and installing it.

Nov 13 12 04:43 pm  Link  Quote 
Retoucher
Peano
Posts: 4,106
Lynchburg, Virginia, US


Noodleputer wrote:
My suggestion doesn't actually take that long

Yes it does. It takes that long and a good deal longer.

if anything maybe equivalent to the same amount of time you'd spend looking for "just the right brush" and installing it.

No, it isn't anywhere close to equivalent.

Let's walk through your description of the process you recommend:

Use a paint brush, color white. Set the opacity to however you want

However I want? Do you mean that I can get a realistic result no matter what opacity I set?

and pain[t] the general shape.

The general shape? I have no training in painting. Do you think it's a simple matter to "paint the general shape" of smoke for someone who has never painted anything?

Now to actually make it flow like smoke, I use 2 tools. Smudge (change the pressure to how you like)

Change the pressure how I like? I have no like. I asked how to add smoke to an existing image. I've never used the smudge tool. How do you expect me not only to choose the correct pressure but also to use a proper technique to create smoke?

and liquify. If you're not use to creating/drawing things by hand, this might be slightly difficult ...

No kidding. (If you're not used to repairing an internal combustion engine, this might be slightly difficult.) The liquify filter has a bunch of different tools, and each one has several settings (brush size, brush density, brush pressure, etc.). Which tool am I supposed to use? Which settings? What technique to create realistic smoke?

---

Here's the point. When someone asks "How do you do X?" it isn't much help to tell them to paint the "general shape" and smudge with "any pressure you please," etc. What you're really telling them to do is learn a bunch of new skills, which will require a lot of time to practice, and then they can (maybe) create realistic smoke from scratch.

No. If the immediate need is to add realistic smoke to a cigarette, just download a set of free smoke brushes (I provided a link). That takes maybe 30 seconds. Install them. That's another 15 seconds, assuming you've installed brushes before, and five minutes if you have to learn it from scratch. Try a few, or try all of them in the set, and pick one that works best for your needs.

Nov 13 12 05:32 pm  Link  Quote 
Retoucher
Noodleputer
Posts: 13
San Diego, California, US


Peano wrote:

Noodleputer wrote:
My suggestion doesn't actually take that long

Yes it does. It takes that long and a good deal longer.

if anything maybe equivalent to the same amount of time you'd spend looking for "just the right brush" and installing it.

No, it isn't anywhere close to equivalent.

Let's walk through your description of the process you recommend:

Use a paint brush, color white. Set the opacity to however you want

However I want? Do you mean that I can get a realistic result no matter what opacity I set?

and pain[t] the general shape.

The general shape? I have no training in painting. Do you think it's a simple matter to "paint the general shape" of smoke for someone who has never painted anything?

Now to actually make it flow like smoke, I use 2 tools. Smudge (change the pressure to how you like)

Change the pressure how I like? I have no like. I asked how to add smoke to an existing image. I've never used the smudge tool. How do you expect me not only to choose the correct pressure but also to use a proper technique to create smoke?


No kidding. (If you're not used to repairing an internal combustion engine, this might be slightly difficult.) The liquify filter has a bunch of different tools, and each one has several settings (brush size, brush density, brush pressure, etc.). Which tool am I supposed to use? Which settings? What technique to create realistic smoke?

---

Here's the point. When someone asks "How do you do X?" it isn't much help to tell them to paint the "general shape" and smudge with "any pressure you please," etc. What you're really telling them to do is learn a bunch of new skills, which will require a lot of time to practice, and then they can (maybe) create realistic smoke from scratch.

No. If the immediate need is to add realistic smoke to a cigarette, just download a set of free smoke brushes (I provided a link). That takes maybe 30 seconds. Install them. That's another 15 seconds, assuming you've installed brushes before, and five minutes if you have to learn it from scratch. Try a few, or try all of them in the set, and pick one that works best for your needs.

All suggestions were under the assumption that the request was made from somebody who was not a complete beginner in Photoshop and it's tools. The "best ways" to go at something differ, which is why there are various suggestions. If your goal here is to try to convince me or whoever- that you're correct, I applaud you for taking the time in dissecting a suggestion and having a rebuttal for each sentence. I will not discuss this further with you.

Nov 13 12 05:46 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
NothingIsRealButTheGirl
Posts: 32,436
Los Angeles, California, US


Peano wrote:
Give this a try.

There seem to be an inordinate number of Rube Goldgerg's descendants posting suggestions on this topic.

True. As soon as I suggested using a brush the thread pretty much could have ended there.

And if the OP is adding smoke to a b&w image he doesn't even have to worry about subtle color variation within the smoke. Extra easy. smile

http://ecology.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/Tobacco-Smoke-Havard-edu.JPGhttp://jfrancis.smugmug.com/photos/i-NJ5cx53/0/O/i-NJ5cx53.jpg

Nov 14 12 10:54 am  Link  Quote 
guide forum
Photographer
Giacomo Cirrincioni
Posts: 21,041
New York, New York, US


NothingIsRealButTheGirl wrote:

True. As soon as I suggested using a brush the thread pretty much could have ended there.

And if the OP is adding smoke to a b&w image he doesn't even have to worry about subtle color variation within the smoke. Extra easy. smile

http://ecology.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/Tobacco-Smoke-Havard-edu.JPGhttp://jfrancis.smugmug.com/photos/i-NJ5cx53/0/O/i-NJ5cx53.jpg

Yep.

75% real 25% added.  Hard to tell apart:

http://photos.modelmayhem.com/photos/120223/21/4f4724398db02.jpg

Nov 14 12 11:32 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
M Pandolfo Photography
Posts: 12,116
Tampa, Florida, US


Peano wrote:
No, it isn't anywhere close to equivalent.

Let's walk through your description of the process you recommend:

Use a paint brush, color white. Set the opacity to however you want

However I want? Do you mean that I can get a realistic result no matter what opacity I set?

and pain[t] the general shape.

The general shape? I have no training in painting. Do you think it's a simple matter to "paint the general shape" of smoke for someone who has never painted anything?

Now to actually make it flow like smoke, I use 2 tools. Smudge (change the pressure to how you like)

Change the pressure how I like? I have no like. I asked how to add smoke to an existing image. I've never used the smudge tool. How do you expect me not only to choose the correct pressure but also to use a proper technique to create smoke?


No kidding. (If you're not used to repairing an internal combustion engine, this might be slightly difficult.) The liquify filter has a bunch of different tools, and each one has several settings (brush size, brush density, brush pressure, etc.). Which tool am I supposed to use? Which settings? What technique to create realistic smoke?

---

Here's the point. When someone asks "How do you do X?" it isn't much help to tell them to paint the "general shape" and smudge with "any pressure you please," etc. What you're really telling them to do is learn a bunch of new skills, which will require a lot of time to practice, and then they can (maybe) create realistic smoke from scratch.

No. If the immediate need is to add realistic smoke to a cigarette, just download a set of free smoke brushes (I provided a link). That takes maybe 30 seconds. Install them. That's another 15 seconds, assuming you've installed brushes before, and five minutes if you have to learn it from scratch. Try a few, or try all of them in the set, and pick one that works best for your needs.

This is the best post...ever.

Nov 14 12 11:42 am  Link  Quote 
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