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first12
Photographer
CameraSight
Posts: 1,077
Roselle Park, New Jersey, US


try  http://www.aiconversions.com/

Marty McBride wrote:
I have the chance to pick up 3 older Nikkor non ais lenses for a great deal. As is, they won't do me any good. Anyone have any idea what the cost is to have a lens converted to ais, and where a good place is to have it done? Also, does anyone own any of these lenses and are these older versions sharp. I own the newer versions of all of them and they are indeed very sharp.

Nikkor 105 2.5 - Nikkor 35 2.8 - Nikkor 50 1.4 

http://i1196.photobucket.com/albums/aa406/marty644/cff5df65.jpg

try
http://www.aiconversions.com/

Sep 17 12 02:21 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Christopher Hartman
Posts: 53,910
Buena Park, California, US


I wish I had some old gear to play with.
Sep 17 12 02:27 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Tim Foster
Posts: 1,758
New York, New York, US


Christopher Hartman wrote:
I wish I had some old gear to play with.

Start with a Nikon Series E 50mm pancake. About $50 and a fantastic lens.

Sep 18 12 03:57 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Marty McBride
Posts: 3,132
Owensboro, Kentucky, US


Tim Foster wrote:

Start with a Nikon Series E 50mm pancake. About $50 and a fantastic lens.

OH....my first lens ever that came with my Nikon FM. Very sharp, but haven't used it in years.

Sep 18 12 07:33 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Karl Blessing
Posts: 30,853
Grand Rapids, Michigan, US


Creative Digital Imagez wrote:
My understanding is that as long as you shoot with NIKON that you may stay use the old glass, You just have to use without AIS.

If I recall correctly, pre-AI lens will damage your camera if you attempt to mount it. This was true of pre-AI lens fitted onto AI Nikon bodies. You had to get an AI conversion done (didn't need to be AIS, just simply had to be AI'd) in order for it to fit without damaging the camera.

cyberean wrote:
depends on the camera.  if the camera has an aperture index ring (all single and triple digit models do)...  the *fixed* aperture indexing tab/coupling lever on that ring is what you'll be breaking/damaging with an unmodified lens

Some of the Nikon film bodies had this switch option for that purpose (around the time that you'd still have some non-AI'd lens around). But a Digital SLR will not have this benefit, as they are only designed for AI lens or later.

Sep 18 12 07:39 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Karl Blessing
Posts: 30,853
Grand Rapids, Michigan, US


Christopher Hartman wrote:
I wish I had some old gear to play with.

I play with old gear all the time on my Olympus E-P3 lol. (nothing in nikon mount though, but I use an SMC Pentax-M 50/1.4, Jupiter-11 135/4, Tamron SP 90/2.8 1:1, etc on the olympus).

Sep 18 12 07:42 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Scott Murphy Photo
Posts: 72
Pensacola, Florida, US


All of those are excellent lenses, though the lack of multicoating means you need to be mindful of off axis bright light sources to prevent flare or ghosts. Older Nikkors work quite well on digital cameras and 99% of them are built a WHOLE LOT BETTER than the ones Nikon is spitting out now. Some of them are junk mechanically, including some with PLASTIC bayonet mounts.......WTF??

It is possible to find some AI conversion kits on Fleabay and other places and DIY. I did this with an older 105mm non-AI Nikkor. But keep in mind that some lenses are a lot easier to do than others unless you are a repairman who knows how the things come apart. Some are easy and some are difficult.

I have an older non-AI 50mm f/1.4 Nikkor I could not find a conversion kit for so I converted it myself using a Dremel and cut off wheel. What you will have to do is cut out a segment of the aperture ring (remove it from the lens first, you don't want brass or aluminum pieces getting inside the lens!) that will cover the entire range of the aperture movement. To look where the notch has to start with that particular lens, find a photo of an AI or AIS Nikkor variant of that lens and look where the notch starts. Use an aperture number as a reference point. Take enough of the aperture ring off so that the edge clears the tip of the aperture prong by a mm or so to ensure you will not get any binding
Feb 02 13 06:14 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Al Lock Photography
Posts: 15,832
Bangkok, Bangkok, Thailand


I owned all three of those for years. Great lenses. Solid workhorses. Just watch for flare.
Feb 02 13 07:25 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Raoul Isidro Images
Posts: 6,048
Sydney, New South Wales, Australia


.
Feb 02 13 07:41 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Vector One Photography
Posts: 2,652
Fort Lauderdale, Florida, US


Got old and just repeated myself. Sorry.
Feb 02 13 08:43 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Zack Zoll
Posts: 2,324
Glens Falls, New York, US


The 50mm is great.  The 35mm is pretty awful.  The 105mm is somewhere in between.

All of them will have lower contrast, and colours will be less accurate than newer versions.  They will also be much more prone to lens flare, haze, CA, etc.  They were designed for black and white film, which has greater contrast and (depending on developing) resistance to haze than colour does.

If you shoot black and white, and bump up your clarity or contrast a little, you'll love these lenses.  Shooting colour, the only one you'll probably like is the 50mm.
Feb 03 13 08:02 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Patrickth
Posts: 10,321
Bellingham, Washington, US


Marty McBride wrote:

My understanding from what I've read online since I started the post, is that attempting to mount them on my new cameras could result in damage. I think I will buy them and pay the $25-$35 each to have them converted, and if nothing else they will make beautiful desk ornaments! smile

Have each of them. Convert is one option, but another is just go get an older nikkormat, break out some film and rock and roll!

Feb 03 13 09:38 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Jerry Nemeth
Posts: 27,138
Dearborn, Michigan, US


gl-amour wrote:
Are these the ones that Canon 5DMII users mount for their video productions?

I use my old Nikkor lenses on my Canon.

Feb 03 13 03:20 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
R Michael Walker
Posts: 11,974
Costa Mesa, California, US


Marty McBride wrote:
I have the chance to pick up 3 older Nikkor non ais lenses for a great deal. As is, they won't do me any good. Anyone have any idea what the cost is to have a lens converted to ais, and where a good place is to have it done? Also, does anyone own any of these lenses and are these older versions sharp. I own the newer versions of all of them and they are indeed very sharp.

Nikkor 105 2.5 - Nikkor 35 2.8 - Nikkor 50 1.4 

http://i1196.photobucket.com/albums/aa406/marty644/cff5df65.jpg

I had all those back around 1972. BTW...Can't you use them on your digital bodies manually? I've never tried since I sold mine LONG ago.

Feb 03 13 03:31 pm  Link  Quote 
guide forum
Photographer
Robb Mann
Posts: 10,108
Baltimore, Maryland, US


If you shoot mf lenses on a modern Nikon, consider one of these:http://www.nikonusa.com/en/Nikon-Products/Product/Viewfinders/4752/DR-5-Screw-in-Right-Angle-Viewfinder.html

It has revolutionized my use of MF glass, particularly my 50 f1.2 and Samyang 85 f1.4. Great accessory.
Feb 23 13 05:43 pm  Link  Quote 
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