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Photographer
Yingwah Productions
Posts: 1,341
New York, New York, US


I was shooting at the US Open and Panasonic has booths there where you can borrow a camera for the day and they give you the memory card to take home the pictures. I gave it a try to compare against my D800 +70-200mm 1.7x. The real panasonic rep saw my shots and came to talk to me (the people working the booth are 'spokesmodel' types and didn't know much). I told him what I liked and didn't like about the camera.
 
  I was asking him about sensor sizes and he told me the small mirrorless interchangeable lens cameras will be phased out eventually. Reasons being there's too much crossover. They have a integrated lens camera that can zoom 60X 20mm-1200mm, 5 fps with focus tracking, 9fps focus lock. They're going to make one with m4/3 sensor in future. (this was the camera I borrowed to see the ridiculous zoom)
  The compact interchangeable lens cameras cost the same or more than the low level DSLRs like canon rebel, and pros complain about the controls, so they're gonna concentrate on larger 'SLR' form factor even tho it will be mirrorless. Makes sense to me, tracking action is easier looking at viewfinder than holding camera in front of me looking at rear lcd.
 
  He also said companies are developing just the sensor to attach to the lens and image will be sent to smartphone by bluetooth or something. Companies like Sony that use larger sensors will phase out their NEX lenses because of this.

So in the future it will be point and shoots with large sensors, which sony is already making anyway, or larger SLR type bodies. Whether it will have mirror or not is debatable. Current mirrorless cameras will be a SLR lens and your smartphone.
Sep 02 13 02:39 am  Link  Quote 
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Photographer
Robb Mann
Posts: 10,170
Baltimore, Maryland, US


Its hard to predict the future. Smartphones are killing P&S sales across the board. Mirrorless sales are down in Europe & North America. Hard to say if the mirrorless drop is a trend or not. Mirrorless sales would likely pick up if Nikon or Canon took the segment serious and released uncompromised mirrorless cameras.
Sep 02 13 05:27 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Virtual Studio
Posts: 5,610
Toronto, Ontario, Canada


The big target market for mirrorless right now is SE Asiam young women. They want something small enough to put in a purse whcih gives DSLR quality.

You simply cant get that with a FF DSLR.

North America is only one market - and it only takes the one marketing breakthrough to have the same shift happen here.

Personally I think you will see the death of APS DSLRs and the market split into FF DSLR for some specialist users (the guys who used to use medium format) in the days on film and mirrorless for the enthusiast market.
Sep 02 13 06:55 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
GM Photography
Posts: 6,056
Olympia, Washington, US


I realize they're not a player on the scale of Nikon or Canon, but Olympus appears to have completely discontinued their DSLR lineup while constantly cranking out new compact mirror-less bodies.  The rumor mill among the few remaining Olympus "faithful" is that the successor to the OM-D will be a "Pro" mirror-less body that will be introduced this month.
Sep 02 13 08:03 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
ACPhotography
Posts: 8,620
Plainview, New York, US


Robb Mann wrote:
Its hard to predict the future. Smartphones are killing P&S sales across the board. Mirrorless sales are down in Europe & North America. Hard to say if the mirrorless drop is a trend or not. Mirrorless sales would likely pick up if Nikon or Canon took the segment serious and released uncompromised mirrorless cameras.

How many of us actually carry a P&S anymore? I still have an old G10, it stays in the center console of my truck to get the few shots I can't get with my iPhone...

From what I have heard from friends at N the camera they are producing didn't catch on as well as they had hoped.

Sep 02 13 08:12 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Yingwah Productions
Posts: 1,341
New York, New York, US


Robb Mann wrote:
Its hard to predict the future. Smartphones are killing P&S sales across the board. Mirrorless sales are down in Europe & North America. Hard to say if the mirrorless drop is a trend or not. Mirrorless sales would likely pick up if Nikon or Canon took the segment serious and released uncompromised mirrorless cameras.

I think canon and nikon most likely saw the market trend the same way the panasonic guy saw it. Like most people that buy a budget SLR, they never buy anything beyond the kit lens. I think mirrorless is the same, they might buy 1 zoom in addition to a pancake lens. Having a whole separate lens line will be a money pit. "Enthusiasts" low level SLR users that buy multiple lenses are a fraction of the budget SLR market. Enthusiast mirrorless users are a fraction of that fraction. Plus there's the chance the Enthusiast SLR will jump to the pro bodies and expensive lenses, mirrorless doesn't offer that upgrade path. Figuring ways to keep single lens line is smarter long term

Sep 02 13 08:25 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Smedley Whiplash
Posts: 17,282
Billings, Montana, US


I have 2 of them, the NEX-7 and the Samsung NX300.   They are both fantastic for different reasons.

I would never buy the built-in lens style unless it came in under $500, because it has too many limitations. 20mm as the widest focal length just isnt enough. 11-12mm is the right starting point, because it becomes roughly 16mm when you figure in the sensor crop.

Personally, I thjnk they know we get bored easily, and at the same time easily excited by new equipment. In some respects Sumsung may be leading the pack with their camera that has an android operating system, which might allow 3rd parties to write custom operational apps and in-camera processing apps that the mfg can't imagine. To me, thats really the future.
Sep 02 13 08:34 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Yingwah Productions
Posts: 1,341
New York, New York, US


Virtual Studio wrote:
The big target market for mirrorless right now is SE Asiam young women. They want something small enough to put in a purse whcih gives DSLR quality.

You simply cant get that with a FF DSLR.

North America is only one market - and it only takes the one marketing breakthrough to have the same shift happen here.

Personally I think you will see the death of APS DSLRs and the market split into FF DSLR for some specialist users (the guys who used to use medium format) in the days on film and mirrorless for the enthusiast market.

As I mentioned, sony is already making point and shoots with large sensors. Granted the FF is $2700 but they'll come down in price eventually. Their $600 one comes with a sensor same size as the Nikon 1 series.
  Walking around the US open I saw alot of those compact superzooms, which is more a SLR type form factor than compact mirrorless. If you're shooting alot its just easier to handle when using all day. Having a viewfinder makes it easier to track action, and you're actually able to see in bright sunlight. I don't see SLR form factor as going away

Sep 02 13 08:54 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Leighthenubian
Posts: 2,769
Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain


I don't see it disappearing so much as evolving. These are early days for those products and will need a couple years of trial and error to figure out what works, for whom and at what price point.

Professional (and wannabe) photographers look for different things than the average consumer. While we are at it, not very many image users (buyers) can tell the difference between a file from a pro camera and a point and shoot if all the key ingredients are accurate (exposure, focus and post processing).

The challenge is to fit new tech into smaller/lighter/tougher packages with enough expand-ability to suit a range of consumers at a price point that makes sense to grow the market.
Sep 02 13 09:01 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Tim Foster
Posts: 1,758
New York, New York, US


I have absolutely no use for the mirror in my D800E. I'd much prefer a more compact version with the same sensor.
Sep 02 13 09:15 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Yingwah Productions
Posts: 1,341
New York, New York, US


GM Photography wrote:
I realize they're not a player on the scale of Nikon or Canon, but Olympus appears to have completely discontinued their DSLR lineup while constantly cranking out new compact mirror-less bodies.  The rumor mill among the few remaining Olympus "faithful" is that the successor to the OM-D will be a "Pro" mirror-less body that will be introduced this month.

For a company that has filed for bankruptcy a few times i don't know how reliable they are as a future market predictor. Panasonic has taken over the 4/3 and m4/3 market, and Sony and Fuji dominate the the compact interchangeable lens market

Sep 02 13 09:43 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Yingwah Productions
Posts: 1,341
New York, New York, US


Smedley Whiplash wrote:
In some respects Sumsung may be leading the pack with their camera that has an android operating system, which might allow 3rd parties to write custom operational apps and in-camera processing apps that the mfg can't imagine. To me, thats really the future.

Thats why companies are developing just a sensor to attach to the back of the lens and transmit to phone. Building android OS into the camera means it will be obsolete in less than a year when android or apple updates it's OS

Sep 02 13 09:57 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
TimothyH
Posts: 1,606
Madison, Wisconsin, US


I only have use for two camera sizes: SLR and compact camera that fits in a back pocket (I currently use a Canon S95 that shoots RAW). I tried a very, very nice digital rangefinder, but the size was too similar to my SLR (which performed better).

That's my take on it.

-Timothy
www.timothyhughes.com
Sep 02 13 10:04 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
You Can Call Me Pierre
Posts: 741
Montreal, Quebec, Canada


I prefer to drink Panasonic's Kool-Aid from their recently released, July 2013, Annual Report to investors:
"Digital still camera (DSC) business: concentrate on mirror- less cameras and high value-added compact cameras
We intend to concentrate resources on mirror-less cameras and high value-added compact cameras, and at the same time work to reduce the number of entry-level compact camera models and total fixed costs"
Sep 02 13 10:12 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Art Silva
Posts: 9,094
Santa Barbara, California, US


Two different beasts, two different technologies. The beauty of the interchangeable mirror less systems is that you can use your existing lenses by way of the correct adapter but most likely would loose auto features. I have both Nikon DSLRs and the Fuji XF system and I find myself shooting more with my Fuji lately, mainly non photoshoot situations where the mobility factor is key... Street shooting, landscapes, etc.
However I did shoot my first location model shoot a couple weeks ago and got amazing results, all without the bulkiness of my Nikon gear.

I find it hard to believe the mirror less industry is folding before it even starts. Their are some awesome camera systems coming out and the quality is there. Marketing hasn't been huge yet and more new sensor and lens technology has yet to come public.
It just depends on what individual uses are and how these cameras are marketed. A good percentage of consumers are in the dark about the whole mirror less thing, where I talk to many photographers who sees my Fuji and have no idea that it even exists or heard little about.
Sep 02 13 10:29 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
GM Photography
Posts: 6,056
Olympia, Washington, US


Yingwah Productions wrote:

For a company that has filed for bankruptcy a few times i don't know how reliable they are as a future market predictor. Panasonic has taken over the 4/3 and m4/3 market, and Sony and Fuji dominate the the compact interchangeable lens market

The bankruptcy was a result of some insider financial hijinks, not their camera division, which is a small part of Olympus.  I wouldn't consider them to be predicting the market, but they are competing well with all of the other manufacturers in the mirrorless market, with 7 of the top 20 best selling models in Japan (I couldn't find a US or worldwide list or 2013 figures):  http://www.43rumors.com/cipa-report-on- … -produced/

All types of camera sales are declining, with the exception of high end DSLR's.  This is caused by cell phone cameras more than anything else.

Sep 02 13 10:30 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
SKITA Studios
Posts: 1,564
Boston, Massachusetts, US


Surprising given how well their GX7 and GH3 have been received...

But Sony and Fuji are pushing the interchangeable compacts towards APS-C sensor sizes which is where everyone will go eventually and DSLRs will probably end up w/ FF sensors since Canikon have pushed that market down cost-wise w/ the D600 and 6D.
Sep 02 13 12:12 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Legacys 7
Posts: 33,788
San Francisco, California, US


Mirrorless slr is what will eventually phase out ovf slr. As far as the compact mirrorless. The only thing that I see hurting that segment are the mobile devices. Most consumers don't shoot with high end cameras. They have always used p & s cameras. With smart phones having both still and video cameras with a damn good quality, that is all that they need.

Sony kind of started on the mirrorless slr. Slt isn't mirrorless, but it's not the mirror that is being used for focused and viewing. It's the evf. Now there is talk about Sony getting rid of the slt and making the slr an evf slr camera. Nex cameras are mirrorless.
Sep 02 13 12:47 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Yingwah Productions
Posts: 1,341
New York, New York, US


gl-amour wrote:
I prefer to drink Panasonic's Kool-Aid from their recently released, July 2013, Annual Report to investors:
"Digital still camera (DSC) business: concentrate on mirror- less cameras and high value-added compact cameras
We intend to concentrate resources on mirror-less cameras and high value-added compact cameras, and at the same time work to reduce the number of entry-level compact camera models and total fixed costs"

Thats actually pretty much in line with what i've already said. Their big SLR type camera's are mirrorless and they'll continue with them since they're popular with filmmakers. All their advertising material tout "creator of the world's first* digital single lens mirrorless (DSLM) camera." i.e. alternative to DSLR.
But they'll most likely get rid of the compact bodies similar to sony NEX and Nikon 1. Since for panasonic they use the same mount its not a big deal, but their lenses will start to get bigger and more rugged so it can withstand use by pros. But I think the NEX and V1 lenses will disappear over time.

"high value-added compact cameras" means they'll continue to improve upon the compact 60X zoom like i was using and put in better sensor and make compacts similar to canon G series type enthusiast type camera.

Sep 02 13 01:01 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Viator Defessus Photos
Posts: 1,011
College Station, Texas, US


I don't like the idea of a camera without an ovf. I want an ovf.
Sep 02 13 01:30 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Happy Guy Photos
Posts: 1,125
Upland, California, US


Yingwah Productions wrote:

As I mentioned, sony is already making point and shoots with large sensors. Granted the FF is $2700 but they'll come down in price eventually. Their $600 one comes with a sensor same size as the Nikon 1 series.
  Walking around the US open I saw alot of those compact superzooms, which is more a SLR type form factor than compact mirrorless. If you're shooting alot its just easier to handle when using all day. Having a viewfinder makes it easier to track action, and you're actually able to see in bright sunlight. I don't see SLR form factor as going away

Yes, I think the mirrorless cameras will be here to stay but will slowly move towards full frame rather than APS since full frame sensors are becoming more affordable.

This will be a great time for Olympus to switch to full frame interchangeable lens cameras since they already have the "know how" with mirrorless technology. Sony, with their RX-1, is also in a good position to go in that direction.

Sep 02 13 05:10 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Virtual Studio
Posts: 5,610
Toronto, Ontario, Canada


Happy Guy Photos wrote:

Yes, I think the mirrorless cameras will be here to stay but will slowly move towards full frame rather than APS since full frame sensors are becoming more affordable.

This will be a great time for Olympus to switch to full frame interchangeable lens cameras since they already have the "know how" with mirrorless technology. Sony, with their RX-1, is also in a good position to go in that direction.

It's about size. The RX1 has a fixed 35mm lens and it completely dominates the body. If you put any sort of zoom there - or a decent portrait lens it would be so humungeously huge that the it would ne more like using a telescope than a camera.

Sep 02 13 06:07 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Happy Guy Photos
Posts: 1,125
Upland, California, US


To Virtual Studio --

Virtual Studio wrote:
It's about size. The RX1 has a fixed 35mm lens and it completely dominates the body. If you put any sort of zoom there - or a decent portrait lens it would be so humungeously huge that the it would ne more like using a telescope than a camera.

I own a Canon EOS M with a Tamron 28-75mm f2.8 and adapted to it within a short time. The Sony RX-1 is definitely larger than the EOS M.

Sep 02 13 07:57 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Charlie-CNP
Posts: 2,619
New York, New York, US


bah.... personally I would never purchase any camera with a zoom function and fixed lens like that. I love my primes and that would be a deal breaker right there.
Sep 02 13 08:11 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Zack Zoll
Posts: 2,339
Glens Falls, New York, US


Yingwah Productions wrote:

Thats why companies are developing just a sensor to attach to the back of the lens and transmit to phone. Building android OS into the camera means it will be obsolete in less than a year when android or apple updates it's OS

Ricoh has been doing this for some time.  It hasn't caught on.  The problem with mating sensors to lenses is that it's a good idea with no real market.  It's great that it makes the lens stick out less and pick up little or no dust, but that's it.

You need to pay for the sensor every time, which alienates hobbyists.  You don't always get to use the the best sensor with your favourite lens, which alienates pros.  The compact thing is nice, but ... if you were the sort of person to do the research, and you were okay with the idea of using a potentially inferior sensor for the sake of convenience, you'd be buying a point and shoot instead of an interchangeable lens camera anyway.

I just don't know who they think their market is.

If I had to ballpark it, I would agree that eventually, there will be very few options for interchangeable lens cameras under $1000 or so.  I would guess that within a couple generations the semi-professional cameras like the D7100 and 70D will lose some features, and will become $1000 cameras ... and no one will make a DSLR for less, unless it's a cost-cutting model designed for students.

I suspect that the student market makes it impossible to ignore inexpensive mirrorless/DSLR cameras.  It's not a large portion of the market, and is hardly worth designing or marketing for; but if everyone discontinues their $500 ILCs, the one company that brings them back would make an absolute killing.

And if that doesn't happen, then you can expect the market for used DSLRs to shoot right up.  For a few years after most manufacturers canned their 35mm SLRs, but before school programs started to go digital, there were several models that absolutely rocketed up in price.  Depending on the version, the K1000 could have been worth four times its current price during those years.

I wouldn't be surprised if every company had a single cheap, plasticky model at $500 that they don't even want to advertise, just so that nobody else gets a monopoly on them.  They'd rather sell you a point and shoot so that they can sell you another camera sooner, but they don't want anyone else getting all their business that they'd give up.

Sep 02 13 08:51 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Yingwah Productions
Posts: 1,341
New York, New York, US


Zack Zoll wrote:

Ricoh has been doing this for some time.  It hasn't caught on.  The problem with mating sensors to lenses is that it's a good idea with no real market.  It's great that it makes the lens stick out less and pick up little or no dust, but that's it.

You need to pay for the sensor every time, which alienates hobbyists.  You don't always get to use the the best sensor with your favourite lens, which alienates pros.  The compact thing is nice, but ... if you were the sort of person to do the research, and you were okay with the idea of using a potentially inferior sensor for the sake of convenience, you'd be buying a point and shoot instead of an interchangeable lens camera anyway.

If you're talking about the Ricoh GXR http://www.ricoh.com/r_dc/gxr/features.html
its a totally different concept from what I'm talking about.

WVIL-WIRELESS VIEWFINDER INTERCHANGEABLE LENS explains it best
http://www.artefactgroup.com/wvil/

Even though it says concept, other companies are developing same idea.

Samsung already has "Smart Camera" that you can fully control remotely from a smartphone.
http://mirrorlesscentral.com/ces-2013-s … d-sharing/

the next obvious step is just to strip everything off the camera other than the sensor and shutter

Sep 02 13 10:15 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
RacerXPhoto
Posts: 2,462
Brooklyn, New York, US


Are these the same people that said BetaMax would rule the video world ?
Sep 02 13 10:18 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Photos by Lorrin
Posts: 6,946
Eugene, Oregon, US


And I can remember when 35 mm film would replace 2 1/4.

Were they ever wrong.  (some one forgot to tell these experts about digital)

Maybe Google glass will replace everything - then again maybe not
Sep 03 13 03:28 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Mcary
Posts: 1,803
Fredericksburg, Virginia, US


Personally I'll stick with a SLR/DSLR with an optical viewfinder for when I want to shoot with lens that wider then 15mm or longer then 75mm or when I want to shoot macro.  As far as mirror less goes I'll stick the the original and still the best mirror less system a rangefinder with an optical view finder as I rather have a good size body that fits nicely in my hands that uses small/compact lens then a huge lens on a small body.
Sep 03 13 06:28 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Smedley Whiplash
Posts: 17,282
Billings, Montana, US


Yingwah Productions wrote:

If you're talking about the Ricoh GXR http://www.ricoh.com/r_dc/gxr/features.html
its a totally different concept from what I'm talking about.

WVIL-WIRELESS VIEWFINDER INTERCHANGEABLE LENS explains it best
http://www.artefactgroup.com/wvil/

Even though it says concept, other companies are developing same idea.

Samsung already has "Smart Camera" that you can fully control remotely from a smartphone.
http://mirrorlesscentral.com/ces-2013-s … d-sharing/

the next obvious step is just to strip everything off the camera other than the sensor and shutter

Unfortunately, the NX300 which is a much better camera, only allows you to snap the shutter with the App, and doesn't even allow you set the camera parameters first...  it's wifi setting is it's own automatic program which doesn't seem to match any of the other settings on the camera.  It's pretty damn good in daylight though. smile

Sep 03 13 08:40 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Smedley Whiplash
Posts: 17,282
Billings, Montana, US


Photos by Lorrin wrote:
And I can remember when 35 mm film would replace 2 1/4.

Were they ever wrong.  (some one forgot to tell these experts about digital)

Maybe Google glass will replace everything - then again maybe not

35mm never did replace 2 1/2...     Not by even the slightest stretch of the imagination.

Sep 03 13 08:43 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
ChanStudio - OtherSide
Posts: 5,317
Alpharetta, Georgia, US


Eventually we will see more of  APS and 35mm sensor on smaller/mirrorless body. These P&S with 1/X sensor will be phased out.
Sep 03 13 09:31 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
David Parsons
Posts: 972
Quincy, Massachusetts, US


ACPhotography wrote:

How many of us actually carry a P&S anymore? I still have an old G10, it stays in the center console of my truck to get the few shots I can't get with my iPhone...

From what I have heard from friends at N the camera they are producing didn't catch on as well as they had hoped.

My wife has one but hasn't touched it since we got iPhones.  Quality is just as good, and the phone has wifi/cell service, so no need to ever plug it in to a computer to upload (and with syncing through Dropbox, no need to plug in to download pictures).

Sep 03 13 10:35 am  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Leighthenubian
Posts: 2,769
Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain


ChanStudio - OtherSide wrote:
Eventually we will see more of  APS and 35mm sensor on smaller/mirrorless body. These P&S with 1/X sensor will be phased out.

Doubtful... 4-3rds manufacturers are ramping up very good alternatives in smaller packages. The P GX7 is gonna rock and I'm very sure the GH line is going to be streamlined for size along the path of the OLY.

Sep 03 13 12:00 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Kevin Connery
Posts: 16,737
El Segundo, California, US


Legacys 7 wrote:
Mirrorless slr is what will eventually phase out ovf slr.

A mirrorless Single Lens camera isn't a Single Lens Reflex camera.

Sep 03 13 02:25 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Jason Haven
Posts: 38,287
Washington, District of Columbia, US


Tell that to Sony and Fuji. Both seem to be doubling down with new releases lately.

I'm happy with my XF system. Hopefully the next body can get some good PDAF going, but other than that, what's not to like about compact and high quality?
Sep 03 13 05:31 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Happy Guy Photos
Posts: 1,125
Upland, California, US


ChanStudio - OtherSide wrote:
Eventually we will see more of  APS and 35mm sensor on smaller/mirrorless body. These P&S with 1/X sensor will be phased out.

Yes, I agree.

I see full size sensors being mated to mirrorless cameras. Sony is in a good position to lead the way by making the RX-1 into an interchangeable lens camera.

Sep 03 13 05:38 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Dan OMell
Posts: 1,335
Charlotte, North Carolina, US


personally, all I need are two attachments to my DSLR --

* a long flexible optical cable connecting my eye to the camera sensor output (transforming a camera into somewhat more "wearable" device)

* a laser pointer totally set and calibrated, as an integral part of the camera
  (the same ergonomic feedback when you look at your monitor while using Wacom tablet)

in the future, it's probably easier to transform us, stupid customers, into powerful robots than to update the smart gadgets attached to people. slogan: enable people, disable the limitations! (jk)
Sep 03 13 06:49 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
GER Photography
Posts: 7,698
Imperial, California, US


Always kind of felt it was all just a flash in the pan fad to begin with!:-)
Sep 03 13 06:53 pm  Link  Quote 
Photographer
Art Silva
Posts: 9,094
Santa Barbara, California, US


That's what you said about Smartphone photography  tongue

This "flash in the pan" has been a stovetop fire for a few years now and on the verge of becoming a Kitchen Fire. A few companies are about to release new gear very soon, so the ball is definitely rolling.
The fact that we are talking about it has shown the growth of the last couple years in this industry.
I doubt companies like Fuji, Sony, Panasonic and Leica would continue to develop if it wasn't profitable and in demand.

Leica even started building their own stores very similar to the Apple Stores... Now That is saying something going ahead with their new, expensive mirrorless M systems.
Sep 03 13 07:42 pm  Link  Quote 
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