Forums > Photography Talk > What would you do? Canon customer service.

Photographer

Moon Pix Photography

Posts: 3892

Syracuse, New York, US

In 2010 I bought the Canon 70-200 2.8 L IS. Within a year it started exhibiting problems with focusing and every so often, while looking through the viewfinder, the whole image would "jump" (like something was loose internally).  Eventually, it just stopped focusing at all.  It was still under warranty so I sent it in. 

Needless to say, I was a bit upset.. it was after all close to $2,0000 at the time.  I sent it in and it came back fixed.. no charge.  O.k. .. cool, perhaps it was just one of those rare occurrences. 

Then a couple years later (just about 2 years), it starts having the same issues.. jumping, focusing, etc.. So I send it in again.  Canon is saying it is out of warranty and it is going to cost $300 to fix.

My issue is; it is the same problem with the same lens.  I own 5 Canon L lenses and this is the only one that has ever needed repair.. It is also the same issue that it had when it was less than a year old.  I could understand if it was a different issue or different lens, but it is not. From my perspective there is something either faulty with the lens itself or the repair.  Why else would the same issue be presenting itself on the same piece of equipment.

I think that Canon should either fix it for no or little charge or simply replace the lens because it is faulty.

I have to say, I have noticed Canon's customer service dwindling.  I recently had issues where they wanted to charge me a couple hundred dollars to clean a sensor on a 5DI.  They also sent me someone else's equipment and in this case they seem to be passing the buck.

What are your thoughts? What would you do?

Feb 25 13 08:12 am Link

Photographer

L A U B E N H E I M E R

Posts: 8791

Seattle, Washington, US

Moon Pix Photography wrote:
In 2010 I bought the Canon 70-200 2.8 L IS. Within a year it started exhibiting problems with focusing and every so often, while looking through the viewfinder, the whole image would "jump" (like something was loose internally).  Eventually, it just stopped focusing at all.  It was still under warranty so I sent it in. 

Needless to say, I was a bit upset.. it was after all close to $2,0000 at the time.  I sent it in and it came back fixed.. no charge.  O.k. .. cool, perhaps it was just one of those rare occurrences. 

Then a couple years later (just about 2 years), it starts having the same issues.. jumping, focusing, etc.. So I send it in again.  Canon is saying it is out of warranty and it is going to cost $300 to fix.

My issue is; it is the same problem with the same lens.  I own 5 Canon L lenses and this is the only one that has ever needed repair.. It is also the same issue that it had when it was less than a year old.  I could understand if it was a different issue or different lens, but it is not. From my perspective there is something either faulty with the lens itself or the repair.  Why else would the same issue be presenting itself on the same piece of equipment.

I think that Canon should either fix it for no or little charge or simply replace the lens because it is faulty.

I have to say, I have noticed Canon's customer service dwindling.  I recently had issues where they wanted to charge me a couple hundred dollars to clean a sensor on a 5DI.  They also sent me someone else's equipment and in this case they seem to be passing the buck.

What are your thoughts? What would you do?

that's expensive.

Feb 25 13 08:38 am Link

Photographer

pullins photography

Posts: 5878

Troy, Michigan, US

Moon Pix Photography wrote:
In 2010 I bought the Canon 70-200 2.8 L IS. Within a year it started exhibiting problems with focusing and every so often, while looking through the viewfinder, the whole image would "jump" (like something was loose internally).  Eventually, it just stopped focusing at all.  It was still under warranty so I sent it in. 

Needless to say, I was a bit upset.. it was after all close to $2,0000 at the time.  I sent it in and it came back fixed.. no charge.  O.k. .. cool, perhaps it was just one of those rare occurrences. 

Then a couple years later (just about 2 years), it starts having the same issues.. jumping, focusing, etc.. So I send it in again.  Canon is saying it is out of warranty and it is going to cost $300 to fix.

My issue is; it is the same problem with the same lens.  I own 5 Canon L lenses and this is the only one that has ever needed repair.. It is also the same issue that it had when it was less than a year old.  I could understand if it was a different issue or different lens, but it is not. From my perspective there is something either faulty with the lens itself or the repair.  Why else would the same issue be presenting itself on the same piece of equipment.

I think that Canon should either fix it for no or little charge or simply replace the lens because it is faulty.

I have to say, I have noticed Canon's customer service dwindling.  I recently had issues where they wanted to charge me a couple hundred dollars to clean a sensor on a 5DI.  They also sent me someone else's equipment and in this case they seem to be passing the buck.

What are your thoughts? What would you do?

Write the company about your concerns.

Feb 25 13 08:47 am Link

Photographer

GeorgeMann

Posts: 1148

Orange, California, US

pullins photography wrote:

Write the company about your concerns.

This seems the appropriate thing to do.
Often times when we go a bit above the persons in the repair shop better results are eventually obtained.
I do not shoot Canon, but your problem seems to be universal with all brands of late.

Feb 25 13 08:51 am Link

guide forum

Photographer

GPS Studio Services

Posts: 36297

San Francisco, California, US

I would write them a letter, but ... two years is a long time.  The lens could be causing problems because it was bumped, exposure to temperature or moisture, rough treatment or just bad luck.  If you had the same problem two months after it was fixed, that would be one thing.  Two years is just too long to presume it is the same problem.

So I would write them a letter, but ... if they won't do anything, I would just write it off as the cost of photography.

Feb 25 13 09:01 am Link

guide forum

Photographer

GPS Studio Services

Posts: 36297

San Francisco, California, US

.

Feb 25 13 09:01 am Link

Photographer

Light and Lens Studio

Posts: 1447

Sisters, Oregon, US

I had an issue with them over a lens that was stuck on a camera.  Apparently this is common because it's one of their "Multiple Choices" on the repair form.  At any rate they wanted to charge me $300 to take the lens off the camera and another $300 to "repair the lens"  The camera and th lens were both functioning - taking pics while "hung up" 

I ended up calling their repair number and giving them a piece of my mind.  Normally, I would not take that approach, but their approach seemed to make it appropriate. 

They ended up taking the lens off the cam and tuning up the camera for $250 including postage and not charging me anything for the lens.  It wasn't an "L" lens that was stuck and the repair was about what the stuck lens was worth.

Personslly, I think customer service with all large companies is on a greased downhill skid. 

Here is a sign of the times:
A new Canon or Nikon comes with a 1 year warranty.  (They are only randomly tested at the factory)

A "new" refurbished Canon or Nikon comes with only a 90 day warranty.  Every one of these is supposedly inspected and tested after repair.  Why should a "new" refurbished camera have only a 90 day warranty?  Do the companies have no faith in their repair facilities?

Feb 25 13 09:07 am Link

Photographer

M Pandolfo Photography

Posts: 12116

Tampa, Florida, US

I would imagine that fee was without knowing the mitigating circumstances and just a flat-out price quote for services.

I'm sure if you informed them that the lens has already been repaired once while it was still in warranty they would take a different approach and replace the lens for free or at minimal cost.

Yes, 2 years would be a long time if it hadn't already exhibited that problem earlier.

Feb 25 13 09:20 am Link

Photographer

John Horwitz

Posts: 2730

Raleigh, North Carolina, US

it worked for 3 years without problems and you want them to fix it for free...

What should you do?

Seriously - grow up, nothing lasts forever!

Feb 25 13 09:27 am Link

Photographer

kl-photographics

Posts: 296

Lemgo, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany

Light and Lens Studio wrote:
Here is a sign of the times:
A new Canon or Nikon comes with a 1 year warranty.  (They are only randomly tested at the factory)

A "new" refurbished Canon or Nikon comes with only a 90 day warranty.  Every one of these is supposedly inspected and tested after repair.  Why should a "new" refurbished camera have only a 90 day warranty?  Do the companies have no faith in their repair facilities?

why should they give u the refurbished one cheaper if u get the same warranty time? but there must be something to make it reasonable to lower the price. or do u sell pictures, that r aloud to use for just 1 advert or 1 month, for the same price as pictures u give all rights to the client? just my 2 ct.

Feb 25 13 09:42 am Link

Photographer

curiosa des yeux

Posts: 1458

Seattle, Washington, US

Moon Pix Photography wrote:
In 2010 I bought the Canon 70-200 2.8 L IS. Within a year it started exhibiting problems with focusing and every so often, while looking through the viewfinder, the whole image would "jump" (like something was loose internally).  Eventually, it just stopped focusing at all.  It was still under warranty so I sent it in. 

Needless to say, I was a bit upset.. it was after all close to $2,0000 at the time.  I sent it in and it came back fixed.. no charge.  O.k. .. cool, perhaps it was just one of those rare occurrences. 

Then a couple years later (just about 2 years), it starts having the same issues.. jumping, focusing, etc.. So I send it in again.  Canon is saying it is out of warranty and it is going to cost $300 to fix.

My issue is; it is the same problem with the same lens.  I own 5 Canon L lenses and this is the only one that has ever needed repair.. It is also the same issue that it had when it was less than a year old.  I could understand if it was a different issue or different lens, but it is not. From my perspective there is something either faulty with the lens itself or the repair.  Why else would the same issue be presenting itself on the same piece of equipment.

I think that Canon should either fix it for no or little charge or simply replace the lens because it is faulty.

I have to say, I have noticed Canon's customer service dwindling.  I recently had issues where they wanted to charge me a couple hundred dollars to clean a sensor on a 5DI.  They also sent me someone else's equipment and in this case they seem to be passing the buck.

What are your thoughts? What would you do?

3 years (total) is quite a while if you use it professionally. I have also been less than impressed with Canon's repair work and fees, so I no longer even bother to have them do repairs that are under warranty. In the past, it's taken 3 months or more to get a repair back under warranty, and I've had them make mistakes in the repair causing it to take even longer. I would much rather pay someone local to do it in a couple days and be done with it.

For a lens out of warranty, I suspect that you can find an independent repair shop that will fix it for quite a bit less. Last lens I had fixed cost $175 and it had been dropped knocking the lens out of alignment. It was actually better than it was new when I got it back (they managed to get the zoom ring to be much tighter and more responsive than it was new).

Feb 25 13 10:37 am Link

Photographer

Moon Pix Photography

Posts: 3892

Syracuse, New York, US

Michael Pandolfo wrote:
I would imagine that fee was without knowing the mitigating circumstances and just a flat-out price quote for services.

I'm sure if you informed them that the lens has already been repaired once while it was still in warranty they would take a different approach and replace the lens for free or at minimal cost.

Yes, 2 years would be a long time if it hadn't already exhibited that problem earlier.

This is my thinking.  It is one thing if you have had it for a long time with no problems.. another if it exhibited the same problems just months after purchasing and then the same problems again. I did inform them about it being repaired under warranty and while still virtually new.

Feb 25 13 12:14 pm Link

Photographer

Moon Pix Photography

Posts: 3892

Syracuse, New York, US

John Horwitz wrote:
it worked for 3 years without problems and you want them to fix it for free...

What should you do?

Seriously - grow up, nothing lasts forever!

Thanks for the advice.. if you don't mind I would like to offer you a bit as well.  Before you make "smart" comments about a topic be sure to READ so that you don't come across like a fool.

wink

Feb 25 13 12:16 pm Link

Photographer

Moon Pix Photography

Posts: 3892

Syracuse, New York, US

pullins photography wrote:

Write the company about your concerns.

I did speak with the supervisor at Canon Customer Service Center as well as communicating on the phone with someone in corporate who said they would look into it. Will probably write a letter as well.

I should have probably exchanged the lens initially but thought that these things can happen and that it would be resolved..I am almost inclined to pursue exchanging the lens or upgrading if possible (via Canon).  I have had ZERO problems with all of my other lenses and treat my equipment for gently.  It is just to coincidental that the same issue is presenting itself.

Feb 25 13 12:20 pm Link

Photographer

Raoul Isidro Images

Posts: 6287

Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

Moon Pix Photography wrote:
In 2010 I bought the Canon 70-200 2.8 L IS. Within a year it started exhibiting problems with focusing and every so often, while looking through the viewfinder, the whole image would "jump" (like something was loose internally).  Eventually, it just stopped focusing at all.  It was still under warranty so I sent it in. 

Needless to say, I was a bit upset.. it was after all close to $2,0000 at the time.  I sent it in and it came back fixed.. no charge.  O.k. .. cool, perhaps it was just one of those rare occurrences. 

Then a couple years later (just about 2 years), it starts having the same issues.. jumping, focusing, etc.. So I send it in again.  Canon is saying it is out of warranty and it is going to cost $300 to fix.

My issue is; it is the same problem with the same lens.  I own 5 Canon L lenses and this is the only one that has ever needed repair.. It is also the same issue that it had when it was less than a year old.  I could understand if it was a different issue or different lens, but it is not. From my perspective there is something either faulty with the lens itself or the repair.  Why else would the same issue be presenting itself on the same piece of equipment.

I think that Canon should either fix it for no or little charge or simply replace the lens because it is faulty.

I have to say, I have noticed Canon's customer service dwindling.  I recently had issues where they wanted to charge me a couple hundred dollars to clean a sensor on a 5DI.  They also sent me someone else's equipment and in this case they seem to be passing the buck.

What are your thoughts? What would you do?

Looks like the IS module needs replacing.

The Mark II was an improvement.

Like all parts and modules, they conk out, depending on the throw of the dice...

The IS (and VR) modules are a few of the most vulnerable parts of a lens.

.

Feb 25 13 12:30 pm Link

Photographer

Bob Helm Photography

Posts: 18213

Cherry Hill, New Jersey, US

Light and Lens Studio wrote:
Personslly, I think customer service with all large companies is on a greased downhill skid. 

Here is a sign of the times:
A new Canon or Nikon comes with a 1 year warranty.  (They are only randomly tested at the factory)

A "new" refurbished Canon or Nikon comes with only a 90 day warranty.  Every one of these is supposedly inspected and tested after repair.  Why should a "new" refurbished camera have only a 90 day warranty?  Do the companies have no faith in their repair facilities?

New cameras, other than Leica, have always come with a one year limited warranty. Refurbs always a 90 day which is the same as their repair warranty, so nothing has changed in 40 years or so. I cannot think of any company where the warranty on a repair is the same as a new product.

Does not hurt to write or talk to someone as sometimes they will do things for good relations.

Feb 25 13 12:46 pm Link

Photographer

MC Photo

Posts: 4144

New York, New York, US

Moon Pix Photography wrote:
In 2010 I bought the Canon 70-200 2.8 L IS. Within a year it started exhibiting problems with focusing and every so often, while looking through the viewfinder, the whole image would "jump" (like something was loose internally).  Eventually, it just stopped focusing at all.  It was still under warranty so I sent it in. 

Needless to say, I was a bit upset.. it was after all close to $2,0000 at the time.  I sent it in and it came back fixed.. no charge.  O.k. .. cool, perhaps it was just one of those rare occurrences. 

Then a couple years later (just about 2 years), it starts having the same issues.. jumping, focusing, etc.. So I send it in again.  Canon is saying it is out of warranty and it is going to cost $300 to fix.

My issue is; it is the same problem with the same lens.  I own 5 Canon L lenses and this is the only one that has ever needed repair.. It is also the same issue that it had when it was less than a year old.  I could understand if it was a different issue or different lens, but it is not. From my perspective there is something either faulty with the lens itself or the repair.  Why else would the same issue be presenting itself on the same piece of equipment.

I think that Canon should either fix it for no or little charge or simply replace the lens because it is faulty.

I have to say, I have noticed Canon's customer service dwindling.  I recently had issues where they wanted to charge me a couple hundred dollars to clean a sensor on a 5DI.  They also sent me someone else's equipment and in this case they seem to be passing the buck.

What are your thoughts? What would you do?

Are you a CPS member? If not, you can join for free. That might help a little.

Have you sent it in yet? Is the $300 estimate based on a phone conversation or they've looked at it. That may not be the case in the end.

It's also possible that this second occurrence is not the exact same problem can came from something on your end. Unless there's a problem with a whole batch of lenses, there's no way to truly know.

That jump you're describing sounds like the IS working.

I think the only thing you can do is ask for the most senior person possible, explain to them that you have a lot of L lenses, and that you think this problem is very out of character with Canon lens quality (not I've spent a lot so you should take care of me). Suggest that they may have missed the problem the first time, or not fixed it properly because it doesn't make sense that the same problem would keep happening. Tell them that your biggest concern is not the money and you're happy to spend it if it will truly fix it, but that you feel frustrated that it wasn't fixed the first time and maybe they didn't properly listen the first time and missed the underlying problem and fixed a symptom instead.

If you can get them looking at it as something that's not an ordinary problem, they may provide a deal that's not an ordinary deal. The thing is you're still going to have to send it in, because they can't diagnose it over the phone.

At that point you're at their mercy. If they say you have to pay, just pay. There's no competitor you can go to for the repair and you won't be able to sell it as-is unless you take more than a $300 hit.

If you're really paranoid that you got a lemon, have it repaired and then sell it and buy a new one.

Feb 25 13 12:56 pm Link

Photographer

John Horwitz

Posts: 2730

Raleigh, North Carolina, US

Moon Pix Photography wrote:
Thanks for the advice.. if you don't mind I would like to offer you a bit as well.  Before you make "smart" comments about a topic be sure to READ so that you don't come across like a fool.

wink

well, Moon, I'm not the one with a broken lens smile

Feb 25 13 12:59 pm Link

guide forum

Photographer

GPS Studio Services

Posts: 36297

San Francisco, California, US

Light and Lens Studio wrote:
Personslly, I think customer service with all large companies is on a greased downhill skid. 

Here is a sign of the times:
A new Canon or Nikon comes with a 1 year warranty.  (They are only randomly tested at the factory)

A "new" refurbished Canon or Nikon comes with only a 90 day warranty.  Every one of these is supposedly inspected and tested after repair.  Why should a "new" refurbished camera have only a 90 day warranty?  Do the companies have no faith in their repair facilities?

Robert Helm wrote:
New cameras, other than Leica, have always come with a one year limited warranty. Refurbs always a 90 day which is the same as their repair warranty, so nothing has changed in 40 years or so. I cannot think of any company where the warranty on a repair is the same as a new product.

Does not hurt to write or talk to someone as sometimes they will do things for good relations.

You are right about camera bodies, but Nikon actually warrants its professional lenses for five years. So, if he had had the equivalent Nikon lens to what he just broke, it would still be under warranty.

Having said that, I am not criticizing Canon.  A one year warranty is quite normal, plus professional use can be hard on a lens.  I am always amazed that mine last as long as they do.

Feb 25 13 12:59 pm Link

Photographer

Lone Pine Photography

Posts: 38

Savannah, Georgia, US

Unless its under warranty, I don't send anything to Canon for repairs. I use Toshio in NJ.  His turnaround is extremely fast, and he's also a master at adjustments and repairs. Plus he's cheaper than canon.

Feb 25 13 01:00 pm Link

Photographer

John Fisher

Posts: 1948

Miami Beach, Florida, US

Are you a member of Canon Professional Services? With 5 L lenses, I"m sure you qualify for a Gold membership. Not only do you get 30% off on repairs (this one repair would practically pay for a Gold membership), but your repairs are put to the front of the line, and you'd get the lens back in a couple of days.

I first joined CPS in 2000 prior to going to Sydney for the Olympics, and I have found CPS to be a great help when you need to borrow equipment or need a quick repair.

John
--
John Fisher
900 West Avenue, Suite 633
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
305 534-9322
http://www.johnfisher.com

Feb 25 13 01:04 pm Link

Photographer

Moon Pix Photography

Posts: 3892

Syracuse, New York, US

MC Photo wrote:
Are you a CPS member? If not, you can join for free. That might help a little.

Have you sent it in yet? Is the $300 estimate based on a phone conversation or they've looked at it. That may not be the case in the end.

It's also possible that this second occurrence is not the exact same problem can came from something on your end. Unless there's a problem with a whole batch of lenses, there's no way to truly know.

That jump you're describing sounds like the IS working.

I think the only thing you can do is ask for the most senior person possible, explain to them that you have a lot of L lenses, and that you think this problem is very out of character with Canon lens quality (not I've spent a lot so you should take care of me). Suggest that they may have missed the problem the first time, or not fixed it properly because it doesn't make sense that the same problem would keep happening. Tell them that your biggest concern is not the money and you're happy to spend it if it will truly fix it, but that you feel frustrated that it wasn't fixed the first time and maybe they didn't properly listen the first time and missed the underlying problem and fixed a symptom instead.

If you can get them looking at it as something that's not an ordinary problem, they may provide a deal that's not an ordinary deal. The thing is you're still going to have to send it in, because they can't diagnose it over the phone.

At that point you're at their mercy. If they say you have to pay, just pay. There's no competitor you can go to for the repair and you won't be able to sell it as-is unless you take more than a $300 hit.

If you're really paranoid that you got a lemon, have it repaired and then sell it and buy a new one.

Thank you kindly for your very thoughtful response.

Yes, I am a CPS Gold member.

I did already send it in (had a coupon for free check and clean).  I did contact the supervisor of Canon Customer Care and explained that I own a wide selection of L lenses, bodies and flashes and that NONE have ever needed ANY kind of repair (other than routine cleaning and mirror replacement on 5D which was a production issue).  I also explained that it is the same issue with the same lens and that perhaps it is a "lemon" or was not repaired properly the first time when it was only months old.

I tend to agree with everything you have said, though I don't like the idea of being at the mercy of Canon (lol).  I do think it is strange that it is the same lens, same issue.

As far as it being a lemon.. have others experienced this problem with their IS lenses (or non IS for that matter)?

Feb 25 13 01:05 pm Link

Photographer

Tony Lawrence

Posts: 19225

Chicago, Illinois, US

Moon Pix Photography wrote:

This is my thinking.  It is one thing if you have had it for a long time with no problems.. another if it exhibited the same problems just months after purchasing and then the same problems again. I did inform them about it being repaired under warranty and while still virtually new.

All of my cameras and lens don't cost $2,000.00.   That's a chunk of money.   Take a few images of your lens and cameras.   Send that along with a email that you have been a great customer and the issue you are having is occurring again.   Solid customer service is part of why Apple is a industry leader.   Its important and Cannon should also know it.   I can take my Apple Macbook into any Apple store and be helped.   I've had help when my Macbook was three years old.   You spend more for peace of mind and quality.   

Your lens was repaired when it was under warranty and they can see that its the same problem.   So in my view you get a refurbished working lens.   My story.   When I owned Nikon DLSR's one went bad.   It was odd and I called Nikon.   $300.00 was the bid and that might increase... So I waited and sure enough a few weeks later a recall for my problem was announced.   Free shipping to Nikon.   They cleaned my sensor and repaired my crap.   To be candid they should have given you a new lens the first time.   Personally if I had spend 2k on a lens that mofo better work till I die.

Feb 25 13 01:10 pm Link

Photographer

John David Studio

Posts: 1724

Fort Myers, Florida, US

My experience with Canon Service has been exceptional using both warranty and non warranty work.

It appears they covered the first I/s issue with the lens.  Then you went two more years before the problem occurred again.  Do you always leave the IS on all the time?  You should only utilize it when you absolutely need it for shooting.

If left on constantly the mechanism is in constant motion and will eventually wear out like any other mechanism.  You stated having other lenses with no issues.  Do all if these have IS as well?  I have this lens but not in the IS version.  For me a tripod was much cheaper for the types of shoots I do.

I do own the 17-55 EFS IS zoom and have had no issues with the IS.  I did read somewhere about leaving the IS on all the time would cause the mechanism to wear out prematurely.  Now I only use it when I need it and it is off during all other times. My lens is 4 years old and is still going strong. 

Ideally depending on usage you need to get your equipment checked and cleaned every 12-18 months.  These are precision instruments and do require some periodic maintenance.

Feb 25 13 01:30 pm Link

Photographer

still-photography

Posts: 1363

Bothell, Washington, US

GPS Studio Services wrote:
I would write them a letter, but ... two years is a long time.  The lens could be causing problems because it was bumped, exposure to temperature or moisture, rough treatment or just bad luck.  If you had the same problem two months after it was fixed, that would be one thing.  Two years is just too long to presume it is the same problem.

So I would write them a letter, but ... if they won't do anything, I would just write it off as the cost of photography.

^^That is your answer.^^

I've had a number of lenses & bodies go to Canon & Nikon service centers over the years.  They are both less likely to just "fix & return" at little or no cost than they might have been several decades ago.  If you talk with a tech from any repair place they can fill several hours of your day with stories of "minor adjustments" requested by "self described pros with a ton of gear" that show signs of abuse and/or severe trauma.

Feb 25 13 01:37 pm Link

Photographer

William Kious

Posts: 8841

Delphos, Ohio, US

Light and Lens Studio wrote:
Personslly, I think customer service with all large companies is on a greased downhill skid.

You want the goods cheap, right? Any company could give us lengthy, amazing warranties and lifetime service... but most of us wouldn't want to pay the premium.

Light and Lens Studio wrote:
A "new" refurbished Canon or Nikon comes with only a 90 day warranty.  Every one of these is supposedly inspected and tested after repair.  Why should a "new" refurbished camera have only a 90 day warranty?  Do the companies have no faith in their repair facilities?

What do you really expect?

Some of this is our own damn fault. We don't approach cameras as investments anymore. Why SHOULD they offer multi-year warranties when most consumers are upgrading so frequently?

Feb 25 13 01:41 pm Link

Photographer

MC Photo

Posts: 4144

New York, New York, US

Moon Pix Photography wrote:

Thank you kindly for your very thoughtful response.

Yes, I am a CPS Gold member.

I did already send it in (had a coupon for free check and clean).  I did contact the supervisor of Canon Customer Care and explained that I own a wide selection of L lenses, bodies and flashes and that NONE have ever needed ANY kind of repair (other than routine cleaning and mirror replacement on 5D which was a production issue).  I also explained that it is the same issue with the same lens and that perhaps it is a "lemon" or was not repaired properly the first time when it was only months old.

I tend to agree with everything you have said, though I don't like the idea of being at the mercy of Canon (lol).  I do think it is strange that it is the same lens, same issue.

As far as it being a lemon.. have others experienced this problem with their IS lenses (or non IS for that matter)?

I think the important thing is communicating in a way that makes them curios and doesn't make it look like you're arguing simply to get out of paying. Once they believe that's the case, they'll just stonewall.

The thing is if they do, they you pay or lose the entire value of the lens.

Feb 25 13 01:46 pm Link

Photographer

John Fisher

Posts: 1948

Miami Beach, Florida, US

http://www.johnfisher.com/images/10Dproductionline.jpg
Into the Wayback Machine with the amazing original EF 70-200 2.8L zoom!

Moon Pix Photography wrote:
As far as it being a lemon.. have others experienced this problem with their IS lenses (or non IS for that matter)?

I have owned the original 70-200 2.8L, the 70-200 2.8L IS, and now the 70-200 2.8L IS II. I have never had the problem you are reporting. I also think it's odd that you had this unusual problem shortly after purchasing the lens, and then an identical problem with the same lens two years after the original repair. It does sound like there is some problem unique to your lens.

That said, looking at it from Canon's perspective, the problem only re-occurred after two years and may have resulted from some abuse or mishap with the lens. You must send it in of course, but as a member of CPS I think you can also have someone at repair take a close look at the lens and see if there is something unusual about your lens (at which point I'd be surprised if Canon didn't do something extraordinary for you, this shouldn't have happened).

Best of luck, the Canon EF 70-200 f2.8 (regardless of series) is one of the legendary lenses ever made by any company.

John
--
John Fisher
900 West Avenue, Suite 633
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
305 534-9322
http://www.johnfisher.com

Feb 25 13 02:12 pm Link

Photographer

Chris David Photography

Posts: 477

Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

My 24-70 2.8L had a problem where they needed to replace the barrel and motor which set me back $650. The lens has never really been the same since I got it and took me a year before I realised the lens is back/front focusing on different cameras and took it back to have checked and calibrated. They told me the barrel needs replacing and going to cost me $850.  I decided to just take the $850 and replace that lens with the 24-105mm f4 which cost the same amount. Its a great all round lens but for event work it does struggle in low light places where I never had problems before. Now that lens (24-105mm) only lasted 4 months before its coming apart/wobbling from just below the zoom ring and with Canon. Takes 2-3 weeks average to get anything fixed and even with over $30k of Canon products in my kit (7 Bodies/10 lens/3speedlites) I'm ineligible for their CPS program since I bought most of it overseas (grey market).

Feb 25 13 02:30 pm Link

Photographer

John Horwitz

Posts: 2730

Raleigh, North Carolina, US

@John Fisher - OTOH, if no one else is reporting the problem it COULD be the way Moon is using it...user error causes the problem?

Feb 25 13 02:40 pm Link

Photographer

Sal W Hanna

Posts: 6629

Huntington Beach, California, US

Moon Pix Photography wrote:
Then a couple years later (just about 2 years)

Keywords: "couple years later..."
I'd charge you. Obviously you have used it for a few years without issue since the repair, so it's not a warranty or workmanship issue and simply because it's exhibiting similar or the same problems, doesn't mean it's the same fix.

Feb 25 13 02:42 pm Link

Photographer

Christopher Hartman

Posts: 54149

Buena Park, California, US

Moon Pix Photography wrote:
In 2010 I bought the Canon 70-200 2.8 L IS. Within a year it started exhibiting problems with focusing and every so often, while looking through the viewfinder, the whole image would "jump" (like something was loose internally).  Eventually, it just stopped focusing at all.  It was still under warranty so I sent it in. 

Needless to say, I was a bit upset.. it was after all close to $2,0000 at the time.  I sent it in and it came back fixed.. no charge.  O.k. .. cool, perhaps it was just one of those rare occurrences. 

Then a couple years later (just about 2 years), it starts having the same issues.. jumping, focusing, etc.. So I send it in again.  Canon is saying it is out of warranty and it is going to cost $300 to fix.

My issue is; it is the same problem with the same lens.  I own 5 Canon L lenses and this is the only one that has ever needed repair.. It is also the same issue that it had when it was less than a year old.  I could understand if it was a different issue or different lens, but it is not. From my perspective there is something either faulty with the lens itself or the repair.  Why else would the same issue be presenting itself on the same piece of equipment.

I think that Canon should either fix it for no or little charge or simply replace the lens because it is faulty.

I have to say, I have noticed Canon's customer service dwindling.  I recently had issues where they wanted to charge me a couple hundred dollars to clean a sensor on a 5DI.  They also sent me someone else's equipment and in this case they seem to be passing the buck.

What are your thoughts? What would you do?

I would pay to get it serviced and then sell it. Use that money to buy a new one.

If you want to get Canon to do something...suggest they buy the lens from you so you can buy a new one.

I understand your concern...but warranties are what they are.  Just because you have something fixed once does not mean you get a lifetime warranty for that issue or a new or extended warranty for that issue.

it's frustrating...I completely get that.  It is what it is.

Feb 25 13 03:15 pm Link

Photographer

Zack Zoll

Posts: 2627

Glens Falls, New York, US

Without actually being there, it sounds like the lens originally shipping with a faulty IS unit, it was replaced with a good one, and then that unit wore out, was jarred out of alignment, got dust in it, etc.  No matter how you slice it, if you were using the lens fairly regularly for two years, then it's not the same problem.

That said, you probably won't get a new one yet.  Most manufacturers have a policy not to replace the item until the third time it is serviced for the same thing - cleanings don't count, of course.  I'm not sure if being a CPS member affects that, or even if the two year gap is long enough that they will reset your repair clock, so to speak.  But you're far more likely to get what you want if you ask them to fix that one than if you ask them to replace it.

Feb 25 13 05:09 pm Link

Photographer

Michael Bots

Posts: 5970

Kingston, Ontario, Canada

Parts are online


CANON EF 70-200/2.8L USM LENS PARTS
http://www.ekmpowershop21.com/ekmps/sho … 1215-c.asp


various flex cables are popular for different models

http://www.ebay.com/itm/CANON-EF-70-200 … 4aaa5d608f
(this one looks like it's used as a slider switch contact)


http://www.amazon.com/dp/B008607BEY/ref … BEY2405704


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p6jpj9-G10Q

Feb 25 13 05:53 pm Link

Photographer

Light and Lens Studio

Posts: 1447

Sisters, Oregon, US

Michael Pandolfo wrote:
I would imagine that fee was without knowing the mitigating circumstances and just a flat-out price quote for services.

I'm sure if you informed them that the lens has already been repaired once while it was still in warranty they would take a different approach and replace the lens for free or at minimal cost.

Yes, 2 years would be a long time if it hadn't already exhibited that problem earlier.

Canon does not give "estimates" over the phone.  They do not give estimates without having the camera or lens in their hands and inspecting it.  They they give you the estimate and you can decide if you want to accept it or have the item shipped back to you.

Feb 25 13 07:13 pm Link

Photographer

Srefis Limited

Posts: 960

Asheville, North Carolina, US

I take it you use this lens the most of any lens you have?

At least you aren't limited to 22 select repair facilities... (you know who I'm talking about)

Feb 25 13 07:16 pm Link

Photographer

Rich Davis

Posts: 3136

Gulf Breeze, Florida, US

I shoot Sony via Minolta.  I thought I'd buy a Canon G12.  The first one I got had a broken part in the viewfinder.  I exchanged it the same day for a different one.  This time I turned it on in the parking lot, only to discover the same broken part.  I went back immediately and the quality of these cameras fixed my desire I had to own any Canon.

Feb 25 13 07:35 pm Link

Photographer

Michael Fryd

Posts: 3885

Miami Beach, Florida, US

Moon Pix Photography wrote:
...
I did already send it in (had a coupon for free check and clean).  I did contact the supervisor of Canon Customer Care and explained that I own a wide selection of L lenses, bodies and flashes and that NONE have ever needed ANY kind of repair (other than routine cleaning and mirror replacement on 5D which was a production issue).  I also explained that it is the same issue with the same lens and that perhaps it is a "lemon" or was not repaired properly the first time when it was only months old.
...

I find it interesting that your complaint is that most of your Canon gear works better than expected and never needs a repair.  I suspect that if your other lenses failed every so often, you wouldn't be as upset about this lens failing.

In the real world, things are not always perfect.  When you had an issue under warranty, Canon fixed it.   If a 5 year old lens failed, would you expect Canon to fix it under warranty.  After all it had gone 5 years without a problem, why should it suddenly fail now? 


Perhaps, your particular 70-200 IS lens has an issue?   Perhaps this lens is normal, and you just have had bad luck with it?It still seems that on average you have gotten very good quality from Canon. 

Is this your only IS lens?  Perhaps there is something in your workflow that is hard on IS lenses?  Do you dismount the lens with the IS still running, or do you turn off IS before removing the lens?

Feb 26 13 04:23 am Link